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Trenton Times: Tuesday, May 15, 1883 - Page 1

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - May 15, 1883, Trenton, New Jersey                               VOL. I. NO. lidilion. OF-ADVKNTURK GEN. KARGE'S THRILLING" NARRATIVE. KntertaiiiiiiK a Largo Audience In the Hall of the Strtte NOI-IHH! anil Moilol ScliooU A Storv of Suffering In SilH-rmn and MR. IIONNELI.YX DKItl'T. SEVMOl'R ON rOLMH'S. TKKNTON; MAY Third Bditioii. LATKST NEWS BY WIRE. in a I'luv Thsit is by No MCHHH considerable cmirage fbT a young man to appear on the stage for the first time in. connection with professional actors. jjeciallv is this true where the play pel formed is one fit tnigtilies, _ Mr. Donnelly's tlilml at the Opera House hist4 any importance tn CaiiQidatrH Clionen from of ___ the Tililcii mid Kelly, N-u YORK, May H. Seymour, in a four-column in- terview, published in the .Vnil_mid Saturday afternoon, discussing and reviewing the political tttttmtion, not attach evening was watched therefore with consider- Legislatures a.s affecting national polities or Hi ATTEMPT TO DESTROY A STEAMER- A Man an Mxi'Miie uu Board, MOllMNC Hrlef Ulanenn Ht the Kventa of World for Twt'iity-Fonr Hours. thti interest by the general public. Mr. Donnelly necd not be in. the least of his ]icr- not think if fair to disniMf Clevehuid as.a pos- sible Presidential caiulidate, because he is yet (leneral Joseph of Conti- deied jiental and Lite rat Princeton good. in fhr In hits repeatedly ren- j trial, and hits liardly emerged yet from the w.rrvcr style .and then -deemed j dust of the political eoinuiotion iu vvhich he College, lectured bcforu u large audience of ladies and gentleqien 4n the Model Schoof Chapel, on Clinton avenue, last evening. His; subject was Whatever Thou Doest, -do it Wisely and be Hopeful." Instead or discus- sing the ijiiestiou, 'however, he adopted the plan of illustration, drawing for the purpose on his family history, which affords a charm- ing narrative of thrilling personal adventures. TUpoujrhoiif. reinarjviijde bLs brothers and always ftried to act wisely, ana nevpr IOST Tlope eveVi.ln tlie most desperate i.itnations. T'liey were L'oles under the Prussi.in j-nle. -The General _buru in At the age of six he was temporarily during an insurrection of his aiMin..regained..his_ but his father Was sent to prison, where he pined away in a subterranean dungeon -for ipapison with thv most last night'.-, ctiihpauy Mi1. liunnclly was the profes- sional i'li'l the oihi-is-were the amateurs. This does lefer in Mr. Matlack. of course, nor should it reli r to Mr. Pharo, whose 1'iilniiiniix a very elf. ctive piece of work. Mr. Mat- lack gave a conscientious rendering of Ilnuilfl, but bis tendency to rant was in pain- ful contrast to Mr. Booth's ijiiiet but terribly effective personation of the same part, us it is Mr. Donnelly's make-up, in the first place, was good. Possibly the eye-glasses could have been di.speu.si.-d w it'll to advantage, but entered otlice. Mr. Seymour refuses to discuss- future, because men are not so much selected now for the tradition about or for t.lieir general standing; but candidates in these times are more likely to he choseli because they chance to be the men of the hour. Wclister, Clay aud Calhoun were head and shoulders' above the other men of heir time, but they always failed at times 6f iminations. while men of the hour, by trivial i-i-oioit-invi.v ppi-hiipv were chosen 1 icing asked whom, he regarded as the itfob- years. The (ieneral.'s two elder brothers were among the number of the insurgents, and for their, alleged crime that tin -.father suffered. One of .the brothers died, in- battle, and the other was'imprisoned and sen- tenced to the silver mines of Siberia. DOXXIXli On the way to Siberia he taken with a malignant type of typhoid fever, and was placed in for treatment. The 'chief monk, who was- a native of the aaiui- young soldier, and reported that he had died, in order to save him from it was only a choice of imprisonments. Jle diurd not IHJW leave the monastery or he would recaptured and the monks punished. A happy thoTight-struct him. He became' a monk and was still hopeful., Possessed .....of -great eloquence, he jireoclred all around the province under an assumed name and achieved (considerable popularity. Uut a jealous rival in the field of oratory became with the secret of Kargc's history and communi- cated with the Cioveminent'. In the dead ot night he carried away, hi" torn from him, and he w-.is ordered to Siberia. A sjK'ciai guard rendered escape'impossible this time. Down into the dreary depths of the mine he was sent with an old friend whohad also been sentenced, fifteen hundred feet below-thr surface, they saw thr light of, day but -once a with the philosophic character. should lw a thoughtful, sober individual, ,yuil this Mr. Mr. Don- lelly should held his head up more con- stantly. Only now and thin war. im- proper to lower it. a-s though lost in nvsdita- When talking with Hnmlit.lw should, gtixed in his tiice or at the of his those wjio pcr- ;ioh. liave of sonate will Mr.- Donnelly of that fact. The young actor's voice is deiup and well rounded, but he evemjig flic of thr house, and wa-i of the time fairly inaudible. This is a minor point, however, lor he. has the voice and will give it the pi'ch in the future. His cestiijvs. werj1. although rather too and, like all arnateu'rs, he now and then found himself at a loss a.s._to whffl he should do uith his hands. Had he noted Mr. Matlack carefully he would kept his hands at hiS side, instead of near the belt 01 behind him. Mr. Donnelly was letter perfect. He nevei failed in his lines and never needed to In prompted. It was perfectly natural that ht should rather too declamatory in his man- ner but that will wear off with very litth practice. The most searching critic must 11 acknowledge That Mr. Donnelly at quitted himself not only creditahl-y-hut0fa Letter than was expected of him. by the that utnt probably, but ean away only to compliment. I'.ut caudor alsi compels the, bclitf'rhat Mr. Doimelly. ..with ;U his good traits, is not fitted for a profi-ssiona 6 -umi chained to the barrows which it was their duty to fill and wheel to the foot of theshute. This was slow death, and the two companions resolved to make a break for liberty. The unjointing of their was comparatively, easy, btit there was an armed soldier at the _ foot olJhc two.rtt-the top-----, The first one was feTTed with a hummer. They then lifted themselves in the elevator, and with the gun. taken'from" JL'e fallen guard, shot one of those fit the top of the shute. The second one lied. The fugi- tives went three days without food, wandering over the deserts till they were again captured by a roving band. Their prevent adopted the torturing plan of cutting the soles of their feet in a score of But Karge, who had studied medicine, soon grew in favor with the he cured .them cholera, and the Khan, or king, offered him three daughters in marriage. Although a priest, he had to accept them. He was made iucantor, or medicine -man, and lived except .for the Irojibje in- flicted on him. by his marital r sions. This vas siifliclent to make him seek escape. The first favorable was. embraced by. himself and companion to Hoe to a French port, from which they sailed to Alexandria and then to Algiers, they took part in the war iH'twcen the A 110MI-: IN' A3IKK1CA. ring all the.se long yews of absence had not written home through fear of impli- xiatiug his family in trouble. His brother, lht lecturer, had himself IK-CII arrested as an in- surgent and forced to join the Prussian army he ndvauced to the rank of Genetal. It was about this time that Karge, the physi- cian, soldier, priest and iucantor, returned once more to his home to the great delight of liis sorrowing mother. P.ut in HH__th_e people ble Democratic sauTht- lad no idea. He thought Tilden a very able nan. who looked .upon all with large lews, but didn't know Tilden would accept the nfflninatioh, if tendered. He loubted whether Tilden's nomination would Wlileli the Han iipeucd and ContentM Were IMncuvervil in 1 Iu Gen- eral. k By Associated Press to THK TIMKS. I.oNitox, May Thp sa'V5 the particulars of an attempt to destroy a steanmr plyinit biawecn Liverpool and New York have just leaked out at the for- mer place. It appears that j list U'fore the ves- sel rtMerred to left Liverpool for New York, on her last voyage, having on board a number of emigrants, a man gave the Steward a hox and requested him, as a favor, to convey it to New York. The Steward's suspicions were aroused and" he consulted the Captain, tlie him lix Thin month there were thirty-eight deaths from yellow fever in Havana. The remains of (ien. lootjier Were buried Cincinnati. There n a heavy tM-ft MI Mittitgoitiepy, Nv "Y., on Sunday night, and in thr-b.w ice forljlt'rl." ._ _ of is about to visit the I nileil Sfatus! "Tie ha.s liei-n granttd for expenses. Almost the entire village of Leamington, (int., WHM hunnil ytstcrday. The lienniiK- House, NVinb-V and Pulford's stores and H few other biiildi.Mgs'aiv all that ii> IH't. IMRI. The treaty (ierniany and car is based on the niutlitil rccognjtion of the favored nation principle: Germany done or ojlensive- to the sensihili- "ties of Franco, There has been a general rising in llasirt-o- land. Ad'vice-. from there of the loth instant reported that there was on all of the lilih, however, stated that has been fairly restored. The Merchant's Hotel, at Napoleon, Ohio. found t.Tcaii't'ain" tlu' jiV' WIM -vt's- terday Flu- minutes, Seventeen tn number, had a narrow escape. All Ijnt threi Jumped from the w ih-1-.w.i. The bod v. of Katie Peek was found yester- dav in'CasemKia Lake. On Tuesday last. TWO CKNTB. Second "Hdition. A Wia MADE DRUNK. SHAMEFUL AFFAIR IN CMAMDEnSBUflG. ,V Voonu (iirl Kound Wandering on the iiiuiin Intoxii rttt'ti ami I.oi-kcd I'p in the 1'olke Station for the Night done in the presence of the captain and machine. The contents of the box were thrown overboard, but the box itself ww a note made of the address upon it. The of this discovery was not made known publicly in New York on the vessel's arri'vaj there, but the the as his habllis in wsiness "ri'ijdered him misunderstood by jonntry Democrats, especially his Wall street He 'thought John Kelly a man if "impulse and content, to whom restraint. night be ul'sci icr. It i> hauler t-u keep parties united in cities than in the country, where there was more natural cohesion. The_ pros- pects, of Democratic unity in New York State were so slim 'That the State, svs a Democratic- faction could not he reckoned on" for but would have to be taken as then found. "ItALL PI.AYKKS IN THK BAIN. No (iame ut rottMville a COH- To-Day at Reading. .V dispatch from Pottsville yesterdayeven- ing announced that rain had prevented, the game between the Autluatite and Trenton. Jt uot welcome nvws, for the Anthracite are, probably the weakest of the Inter-State clubs, and-the chances of victory with them were promising. To-day the Trenton go on to Heading, and" to-morrow will visit HarnsTnirg. The Merritt were in Reading yesterday, but their game the Active was interrupted by-rain-at the beginning of the second inning, when the to 15. Ruin at Detroit prevented the game between the Detroit and New Yor-kTTluvKrooklyn t Inter-SUtei tackled the Mers at Brooklyn yesterday, in the pres- ence of spectators. At the end of the sixth inning rain began to fall, and t was discontinued. The score stood British Consul j" t.lmf eiiy wsia notitiei) of.it. The steamer lists just teturned to the M-4-rsey from New York." Letter to tliv Irish By Xxsociattn! tu THB _.. lioMK, May l.rv The circular addressed hy the Pope to the Irish Bishops was dispatched oil the Itthinst. It says the clergy must keep alooEl from subscriptions when it is plain that hatred and dissension are aroused thereby, and when it is evident that crimes and murders are never censured by those for whom the collec- tion's HTC, made. It assures .the, rlert'.v that they are certainly 'not forbidden to assist iu raisins collections to Regulta of the Cyclone. By Associated Press to THK TIMES. MACON, Mo., May The cyclone of Sunday night left the. of the town com- paratively uninjured. The, loss, however, will reach Three persons are known tu have been killed, namely, Mrs. Klijah Banta, Mrs. John Clarksou alid Mr. Charles Ross. The being cared for, and ample relief is while escaped I'IVHII her home by her htnlruom window- vvitii insane, s a rope niiide oT sheets. The bodies of a man And two women, which tfere stolen from the 'St. 1'olycsirpe graveyard, iu Montreal, last Winter, were found in the rivt-i Kt._ It is iuppuAL-d tbttt they were hidden tftcwhj ivho found -if -tntpossi- hle fo take them" from Montreal over "the "had Court Cases. The May term of the Court of Clianceix was coinim need at the State House this morn- ing. After a call of the calendar, containing, lilt rOseR.'Ch.iin cllol RunyOii began the read to 1 in P. nbived at Philadelphia peJwEE .....U.-.. timore, the latter leading, 2 to 0, _ There was no rain in Chicago, and the Phila- delphia downed the home champions, to 1. The Cleveland defeated the Allegheny, H to 4. and Harvard College yielded to Amherst, H to 1. Before the'sun -morning, the Doimtlh Sluggers hud Imiiten the Red Btnrk- ting, to PlFTfur match was" played at Smith tSc Kehoe Were the Slug- gers'battery and Scullion and Richardson tilled the same positions tor The Red Stocking. The Innocents yesterday defeated the Hubbs, to the Pressers'Apprentices at the Cree'nwood Pottery were live ahead of the C.lost-ware Kilnmen when the rain to The game between THE TIMKS and Co. B nines, to-morrow, will be called IMSl'KCTING A KKCJIMKNT. T'1 Governor. I'arty in Caimlen Yester- tragedian. FKW M The Health lloarrt Again Tackles tJm IV.tty Run MittU-r--TfiK Markets Clean. A brief meeting of the City Board of Health was held in the Inspector's office yesterday afternoon. iri'tTie absence, of Pres- Went occiijiied .the-'Chair. Dr. ,1.1.-. 11. made his first appouranee-iH the Board. The Jnspector reported that all the nuisances re- ferred to him at the last meeting had been abated except the one in the of Ferry street, below Lamberton. and that uiisitig from James pig .pens, jn the< rear of tin pFunijuu ut Nu.'-J IVnnuigton As to the latter, he added that the pens were now clean, but there was ho guarantee 4-luU they would remain so. The mailer, on motion, was left in liis'ltunds to be dealt snm-4- marily in case the nuisawe reappyaml, A complaint that McCaffrey's pigs ..wallowed in dirt to the djsgust of the neighbor.- was re- ceived from Abram D'A. Nawi. 'Secretary Cloke reported that the. t'oimiut- 188 on PeU.v Kun bud nun Mr. Anderson, of the Pennsylvania Railroad the Sanitary Committee of Council, and together they had inspected the stream. It (mmd iu a much' better condition' than a year ago, Cooper street, where they were inspected by Imt was not yet clean. The Committee j Ttispi-Hor Lieutenant, B. lieved the best thing to do was to dig out .the- Mmplivvassisted by the brigade staff. run again. The Pennsylvania Company Would displav was in every way creditable to the doUs share. Mr. Cloke then and it command. _ The condition of the- arms and ar- was cafrViVlhaf the Tnsjicctorjiotify proper- i contreim-nts was excellent. After a short .ty-owners on the line of the run from Clinton soldiers marched past the residence, of avenue to the Pennsylvania Railroad property Wm. J. commander of the bri- to clean out each hi< share of the liltl) They were reviewed by (rovernor that chokes up the sfreani. j L-wllow, General Mott and staff, Adjutant Mr. MHiuire, from the Committee on Mar- General Stryker. General kets, reported that Frcese's Matket was in ivriine, (ieneral Spencer, General E. Burd the stables at tached would Grubb. and General (Jrover and staff. Iu being provided by the citizens. Winning a Wtirth An enjoyable the outcome ofj.be recent fair for the benefit'of Our Lourdes' Parish, came oil in thr Horoiigh Hall last night, There was singing by the German Liederkrauz, dancing ;ind other agreeable fea- tures. Then came the drawing for the build ing lot on Mott street, which had been open for at a chance. One thousand Tlcfce.ti were sold. No. held by a llamil ton township farmer named Clemejis, v.oii the prize. most of tlie day. Among the cases to be tried this-term is that of Kd ward F. Dignan W. Malhcs; WJlliam Holt, for the Mavor Vroom lor'the latter. In the I'nited States District Court, the trial of Matthew Kooney for .attempting to pass three- hundred counterfeit trade dollais recently at Perth Amboy. is 'n progress. Th-1 circumstances have a I read v in these columns. District Attorney prosecutes, and Mr. I'nnly, of New" York, di lends.-- L. Stanlt-y, who win iiujujcr with Rooney. wilt be trieil separately Theetfoit.s of tlw Law Order Society of ChainlM.'rsburg to put a check to the sale of intoxicating drink in the borough receive a strong indorsement from a ease .that came to light iu the Police Court this morning. On the docket stood the name of Anna Vansant, fourteen years of age, charged with drunken- ness, the 1fttie girl, sobbing and hiding her face in her hands, was.led into the room from the prisoners' cells in the basement of the Bor- ough Hall, where she had spent the night. Police Officer Chambers said he found her__ wandering on flic refused..." to be taken to her parents' house, near the southern terminus of Woodland street. She ,itid l.niglKid and shouted-, and said she had been ing a good time at StemhagenV In the distance were seeu the retreating forms of two youtlis and a girl. They had been her The otfucr-tried ia way to induce Tier to go home or else to some friend's house, but she insisted onjwing to the Borough Hall, and even the mention of -the iron-barred doors did mrt intimidate 'her. She was finally lodgrd in a cell for the night. When the officer had.- tiniahejl ..his story Anna had nothing to add except that she ob- tained the drink three glasses of beer at Stemhagcn's, on William street. Tli'is made her dn'ink. She had never been so before, and she was afraid of her mother, who strid towardn her. The- -beer had been unbiased for her by a boy named Kleiber, aud iwotiier boy and girl were Police Justice handed the girl over tfc her weeping mnther, had been informed of_ the girl's arrestr The mother. WHS much dis- pleased that she bad not been told of the arrest last night. She- regarded it as an out- rage The tot is worth STOCK MAR'KKT. Tin- id' tin- Potl'i-i-t. WASH i MI TON, May I'olger has: uddn.-s.std u dclt'J .R.obesou in reply to bis argument on behalf of the pot- tery manuliw-turcrs, in regard, to thf prope: conslnu-tion of-section the new tarilf law rtpculing the and The Secretary iwlbered 4u that a 1 1-year-old child should be lodged all night in a prisoner's cell. Many coincided ill her f sWmhagen, charged with selling the beer, ust-d to keep a saloon, but after being the 'county courts and released under suspended sentence, she; started a -little gro- cerv. There been complaints thai she still sells without a lieetmiMiiul great indigna lion p'i ex ail- in'thc 'liOroujjh-oyer this (barge. Mrs. Vansant has entered complaint her will be heltl for trial. She The stock-market y-, HceoMfiiK to the report Messrs. .v m.n' .i ThP transactinn who the kiln.- I'V '.IV NEWSPAPER   

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