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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: May 12, 1883 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - May 12, 1883, Trenton, New Jersey                                i; K-0. -TRKNTON, N. JMr TiAlTRDAV, MAY TWO GKNTS. First Hdilion. ACTIVITY IN BUILDING. GOING UP IN EVERY QUARTER. intensive Building Operations lu Trenton and of Dwelling Homes Spring lip as If by Magic An Karournglng Outlook For the City. When building operations were just begin- ning for the season, something like a month ago, THE TIMF> had an extended article on the general outlook in Trenton. The pros- pects for Chainbersburg were also touched upon, but only in a cursory way. Aft CAAIMI- t6-day of the contracts filed in the County Clerk's oflice since April 1st a durpilsiiig briskueas iii the building trade of the borough. As, however, only a fraction of tbooc who erect houses ever file contracts, still more wonderful revelations await the gentle- man of leisure who has the time to make a tour of the outlying streets beyond Clinton avenue and below the Borough Hall. To one who has been away from the city for Cham- bersburg.is practically, part parcel of Trenton the growth of the borough is some thing that can scarcely be believed until it is witnessed. ,0nly a few years ago and broad gieen acres stretched away to the east of the caiml almost within a stone's thiuw of Tren- ton proper. Greenwood avenue, beyond Chestnut, was mainly a farming district Ham- ilton avenue did not extend so far. '1 here w as hardly a house beyond Clinton avenue, and the thorouglftre wsw called Sandtow n road, lu thoss too, the crab apple orchard at thejjoruer of Hamilton aud Chesst- nue avenues bore its choicest .fruit arid liibutwl colic broadcast among the small of thVcTiyT ball grounds used to be-where the Franciscan College" now stands, and to reach it by a direct line oue had toniake his way through a great field of e_-uiu that stretched westward nearly to Clinton av- enne So the rural aspect lontinued southward Kast ol Clinton avenue ntiph prospered or cat- tle giazed where now Hudson, Klmer, Butler and numerous other streets down to I'ond Kuu road, are laid out and extensively built upon. It seems only a few years ago since a small frame building on the lots to the southeast of the Borough Hall used to attract attention by reason of its Jonely, isolated situation. It be- longed tu Llie uetfcltr, among groups of other houses that have been erected on all sides of it. Building has been .general and in all directions for several sea sons past. Towards Greenwood avenue, which is the most aristocratic thorough now houses have appeared, but the tew are of a Very hamlKomr description. The site of the cornfield referred to above is now covered with pretty dwellings, and even beyond the old hall grounds there is quite a little colony, avenue has become a thoroughfare linii on both tidoo with ..jtorca well ns it is the longest IMd-ont thoronghfare4n about Trenton, ex- tcndiqg ns it docs from the extreme end of Millham near the old Still-house down past the potteries, the State Schools, the Pennsyl- vania station, and'then through the borougtrto the southerly terminus al Pulid' Run. There are numbers of new hauses being built this spring towards both extremes of the av eryie. Those being put up along the section lying in Chambersbtirg are chiefly sub- stantial brick structures with and there a neat fiame elwelliug. llamiltcm slieet ats another thoroughfare on which there-are many houses building. As stated, only a fmet ion of the- actual amount of building is revealed by the con- tracts Hie, in County otlice Among them are mentioned IVame dwellings on Hamilton street for IVter Petey. Fred Pied Golele-nnaum, William H-JJuiton, and Midi.u'l Duiuieily A' corner ot Bavard and Piosped streets Lewis Liwfon i-> building two-stoiv brick and at Broad and _ Dye fetrceth John (.1 has_givin the contract for putting up a foot addition to his grocery store. Sebastian liusbler lias two brick dwellings under way on Adeline street, aud (Jompper Kleman three frames near by Walliam Morgan is raising two frame on Hewitt street, and two buck ones on Koehlmg ave- nue Kdwaid H Karris erecting a brick on Kusling street, and John Krennan a two-story Iraine on KoeMmg aveuue. Mathilda Wiley has given the contract for a fiaine dwelling on Elmer street. irther are in progress, but no record of them hm been tiled While glancing over the contracts the re- porter noticed a number for houses in Trenton proper them were the follow ing M Stephens, a two-story fiame, Asbury street I ,M Kverett, three-story lirick, "UeM Front street: Jninri W four fi inn s, corner ol Landing and Center John II iitr-ruin. I homas J iKinahoe, Surah Moore. I imniHM (hacTwuk iineT Charles Haggertv, all frames in various localities. (icorge H toii. a three-story brick on Mercer street. Jos. D'ttiUs, two houses at arul Ingleton John three hrirt dwellings on Calhoun street; Klein, a double brick on I Am bei ton street; Alex. Yard, three bricks in the Seventh Ward Benjamin Meyer, two two story on Bmnsrfick ftvejiue; John J.Str" duell- ing on T THE STAFFORD KKL1O. A Patriotic to Kxhiblt Them Once More liefure an Admiring I'ubUc. Samuel H Slaffbid, the patriotic old gentle- man residence on South Warren Street is noted as the repository of many interesting Revolutionary relics, received an invitation a few dayfesiaoe to attend the -meeting and din- ner of of the War of at the Stnrtevant .House on Broadwaj, New York Crty, on July 4th next. Mr, Stafford has accepted, in a letter which reads, m follows: I accept said invitation with many myself highly honored to meet with the patriotic aud public-spirited citizens of New York. I will attend, if no accident prevents, and bring with me Paul Jones' starry Hag of the U. S. frigate Bon Horume the first American flag a roidgu purn-f tht of Paul Jones; the musket captured from the British frigate Seraphis-; -with- a ceitified copy, from the records, of their identity." Mr. Stafford signs himself with the utoat pro- found respect, Samuel Bayard Stafford." A 'lienUm Company's Contract. A contract hM been awarded by the Govern- ment to the T. V. Allis Manufacturing Com- pany of this city for the supply of one bun-, dred and fifty tons of barbed fencing, .known as the Buckthorn fencing, for the use of the Interior Department during the present year. A large number Of companies through _ out the country put in bids for the contract, which was only awarded after a thorough test of the different kimta of fencipg which-the various companies produced. The Allis Com- pany have been running their establishment to its utmost rapacity, the demand for the Buckthorn fencing constantly increasing. Opening of a Hose Fair The much talked about fair bazaar of the America Hose Company will open in the Assembly Rooms of Taylot Hall this evening, i The affair 1i.i% been the subject of deal j of careful pieparation. The arrauge'ment [Of t the booths and ot the goods that will be oiler- j ed for pt rhaps exceeds anything of the kind ever known in Trenton. The interior of the hall presented this afternoon an ex- ceedingly pretty xivne A gieat of inter- est has been arouacd over the ocioMoii, not any less for the reason that it bus Utn well advertised than on account of the popularity of the Hose Company under whose auspicei it will be conducted. The chief that will be chanced off is a span of fine coal black horses. The animals" are young and spirited and were recently bouglit ill cuunlj., Pennsylvania, raised. A gold watch will be contested for by License Col- lector Louis Coutier and John Connell, and a will be contested for by Mrs. Mationey and Miss Louisa Schneider, both articles having been bought at Morris May's, No. 25 South Urceae street. Winkler's band will fuiuish the music. Irish Meeting To-Mono w, Ans. impoitant meeting of Irishmen and frtbudA.of Ireianu generally win oe neui in tte old T-And League hall, corner of Greene and Front streets, half-past four o'clock to- morrow afternoon. The puipose is to the Trenton Land League Branerr into ihe "New Irish National League of and to elect officers of the organization in accord- ance with the programme adopted at the Phil- adelphia Convention. It is expected that there will be a large gathering in honor of the occasion and a heavy enrollment of members. The Jury Cannot Agree. The .-jury in the case of Abraham D. West- brook, a traveling agent late m the-employ of Whitehead Bto.s., the rubber manufacturers of this city, w bo sued the tirnv to recovei alleged to He due lum-a.s part of his yame inter tin? 'CVraiitv Omit alter being out two days v Illjrht.H mill rejifjrtpil fruit CO'lM Thev Third-Hdition. LATKST NKWS BY .WIRE. (Hb UYNAIVin B. Mf-NU Kt-AKKtSltU, O'Connor, Whose Allan ig DuHnn, Chnrged with Compllchy In the Dynamite Plot at Liverpool-A Fatal Coal in General. By A -ociated Press to THE LIVERPOOL, May 12. O'Connor, alias Daltou, the dynamite conspir- acy prisoner, who was released from custody .T CSt'Cl'dftj nud nan ouSinjuciitlj ic-oi i remanded to-day Ou the charge of complicity with Okerlehy and Kennedy in Cenei nl W eat her Indication'. By A mociated Press to THE TIM w. WASHINGTON, May 12. For the New Eng- land and Middle Atlantic States, fair weather variable winds, mostly from south to west, stationary or higher temperature, falling- fol- lowed by rising barometer. A Fatal By Associated Press to THK TIMES. BINGHAMION, N. Y., May r2. A'coattrain on the Delaware, Laeka wanna Western EaiT- road ran into the urar end of a passenger train near New Milford last night. Oiie nian was probably. fatally injured. NEW JERSEY CENTRA1'S TUK MORNING NKWS. Brief O'anceg at the Leading of TOT i Hohrg. The preliminary trial of Charles E. Monroe, of jioisoiiHiK Ins inothei and hrotln r, took place at Hicxik Nc-iil a vesti rduy, aurh rwulttd IB tlw of tho Second I id ill on, THK'NINE MUST IMPROVE The wife of Lncien of No. '271 South 'I weiity-tirst strett, -t-'hliaclt hihia, committed vyjU'iday bj' tnkiujr l.iinlanum. is an ex-member of the Bbard of (iuardiuii8 of thi Poor Yitilorday atlemnnn tlie Mr7 Wil- knison, liviiij; hoven nnlen from St. Kouis, were burned. Three of hig children perished. Cardinal McCalre, Archbishop of Dublin, has gone to the Isle of Wight. After sujourmng there a while he will goto (.'mines. The Dean of Westminster has granted a rc- fur I'vriu'viuu to pUro a buM ol" tlui ji .ut in Abbey.. A-n American of Coleridge's works is to bear the cost of the work. me fact that M. Waddington will Ber- lin before he goes to Moscow to attend the coro- nation of the Czar has given rise to a report that his mission is to assure Oevnauy of the peaceful policy of France. Mrs. John Knnis, a widow, whose husband died in 1878, attempted to shoot Dr. II. W. Pur- nollj tt well-kuowtt physician, at nuon in the Court House at Memphis. She claims that Dr. Purnell premised to marry her, but re- fucod to keep his pledge. THE STORY OF A SAD-FYED CRIPPLE HOT of Receiver Little Says there is no Question the Company's Solvency. NEW May K. Tho stockholders of the Central Railroad of -New Jersey, a_t their annual mtating held in Jersey City yesterday, elected the following Board of Directors: Hairy s. Little, Franklin B. (Jowen, Edward C. Knight, Robert Garrett, Sidney fsheparei. Theodore' P. Randolph, Samuel Sloan, and J. Ke mieely All of these di- rectpts served 4a-.t ye. i; Mr. Tod, w.io lliv jil.i'v cf tht Lite. (.kirk, ot thu Singer ManutaituritiK urn pan v. Mr. Tod will also be. tlie lepre'siMiUtive1 ol the income bond- holders m the l.oaicl. There 151.3JJ of the1 shares of the block voted tor the.' tiikit elected, and no oppo- sition was developed. President and Receiver Little's operations of the Company for the year endmg DoTWiiber .'51, I'-SJ, shows the Camillas to have an increase of those.- of the picvious crease pf and the net earnings 071, an increase of The interest, charges, rentals, etc., for the year were 794, or more 18M, leaving a surplus for the year of or less than the previous A a there la no question now as to the solvency of the Company and its ability to hereafter meet all its fixed charges, including the interest upon its income bonds, a petition for the termination of the Receivership has horn made to. the rhanceljor. and the report of the Master, to whom jt was referred, ex-Gov. Joseph D. Bedle, is' expected at an early day, wjien the matter will come up before" the Chan- cellor for a final decision. The report concludes as follows: A proposition has been made by the Philadel- phia and Reading Railroad Company to lease aud the property of the company under a lease and contract for 999 years, which will guarantee six per cent, dividends to the stock- hordeiB, run from (September 1 next, the first quarterly dividend being payable on Decerubcf 1 ne-xt; anil the Board of Directors are of opinion, .subject to the proper rutitieAtmn by the stockholder, after the tcniiiiiation of tKe Receivership and consequent kgal of the company to act in the premibesrstich le-asej ami contrae t should be1 made The1 report was adopted, and a icsolutum ap- t a One-Am.etl IteKgar Made of tlie Money He Collected. For some days past a mournful-eyed cripple has been seated on the sidewalk on South Greene street, near the Washington" Market. He is an ear by ihe' aaine partii'S General Joseph Karge, of Pniuvton. sor of Continental languages in Princeton Col- lege, who will lecture before the Normal and Model H  Hie Re v Mr '1 he meeting will hi at a ijiiaite r ol loin n k. '1 111 Lveciltlve Ceilllllllltle1 UstSCS ufllir Sc-w .ti i si i [jishlnir-leii Hie 1 >e Illlinli In lit ,i HHC'lllij; vesleiihv ,tl the 1KW buildlntf nn Itfttnllje n 'nc'unc1, iilovt- tJe iliinie r si i il 'i he nl "exit in tlie e himne s John llulev-> hiiU-i on lowle.i e .IMM ei ,tii lil.irni nf fire- wii mil ire ill paitnn nt, onlv to ne'e asiopi loi the 111 lo K" i The fourth sermon of the series on VlfW-l "t IMlJiloll, Will be eliliv'erecl liev Dr Morris to-niui row" eventnj; in the (ireene Street M K. (Lurch The spec itie nub- jee't is, 'An hriHtians the Best Re-prc-sc'iitativcs ol M in hood Tliree, Norwegians, Magnus Trfrt. (uroNki niel arl n, whci were1 auestcd in ,f> rs. ilv a fc w on a c of MiniKKlitiK were HrraiKiic-cl in the I S Uistnct Court, lie fore Judge Niton, ycstordav They W( n' to [iay flncs an ffrHowi Hiuwn, Orrofski and se-ii, each. A team of belongmg to Df. W. McCullough of No. 21 a Perry street, with a car- riage attached, took fright jeaterdHy mid clashed Clinton stn-i-t When near Coxon's Pot- tery one of the fell and the vehicle was upset and slightly damaged. Several pedes- trians raptimd the horses In-fore further mis- chief   Uslwljsih, ('u, of thiscltv rmx u 'lull w 1th mi me luiietioii tnwiinl n lower range of ili" in n vc ry marked-for Sorfolk tnnl Wewte'rii preferred and lower, and the balance of genera] lint tinrcly rteady s fmrtional conuoneion. The result of the New Jersey moeting yejterdny han had yet no effect upon the i took. It Is very quiet and rules between V and Reading IK unchanged, but Leblgh Navi- ItHon h" Improved H to to on a hun- dolUr stock. Money to cr j about4 por vei)   

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