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Nashua Telegraph: Tuesday, November 18, 1969 - Page 1

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - November 18, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today'i Chuckle Do you know what the of kings is? Queens. Ntw KomptUrt's Lorttst Evwtfng Ntwipopw Weather Cloudy, Cold Tonight Showers Likely Tomorrow VOL. 101 NO. 221 CooUnulni UM New Htmphirt EttabUibed October N, 1BJ NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1969 Second CUM Postage Ptid At Nashua. N.H. 24 PA6ES Prie. TEN CENTS ,000 Library Donation Vetoed Park Street or Nothing, Says Library Trustee The city can expect to lose if it decides to move the library con- struction project at this time, Frank B. Clancy, li- brary trustees chairman, declared today. No Library "What I am saying is that if the library project is moved or postponed, there will be no new library for he added. Clancy's warning came on the heels of Mayor Dennis J. Sulli- van's veto of a resolution to accept the supplementary 000 offer made by Eliot A. Car- ter for construction of the li- brary. The library chairman said he felt it is his duty as chairman of the joint trustees-aldermanic library building committee to respond to remarks made by Sullivan regarding his veto and a new library site other than the Park Street location al- ready selected. At the aldermanle meeting last week, Sullivan read a pro- posal drawn up by Thomas Eudzma, a Planning Board member, which called for the library to be built on the so- called Mill Pond site as part of a new high school complex. The Mill pond site is situated north of West Hollis Street and the Nashua River immediately west of the F. E. Everett Turn- pike. In his statement, Clancy said fie must warn Nashuans that to reject the Park Street site for the library now might cost the city million. He responded to the mayor's remarks by reviewing the ac- complishments of-the joint com- mittee, the progress to date, and finally, what will happen if the mayor's wishes prevail. Clancy's statement follows: "As chairman of the Joint Aldermanic and Library Trus- tees Study and Building Com- mittee, I feel it is my duty to respond to the remarks of May- or Sullivan regarding a -new li- brary site other than the Park Street location already selected. "I must warn the citizens of Nashua that to reject this loca- tion now might cost the city million. Santa Fund Now The Telegraph Santa Fund to- day in its third day stands at aided by a ?100 check from the Slawsby Insurance Company and from the Nashaway Woman's Club. Also adding to the original donation from the Telegraph Pub- lishing Company were Ben and Grace Puisifer, A Friend, and from Mrs. William R. Swart. All proceeds from the fund go to the Salvation Army which acts as a clearing house for food, toys and clothing for the needy during the holiday season. (Photo on Back Page) "I will respond to the mayor's remarks by reviewing very briefly the accomplishments of the joint committee, the prog- ress to date, and finally, what will happen if the mayor's views prevail. "First: When Elipt A. Car- ter's initial gift of was made in 1988, the joint commit- tee, the Board of Aldermen and Mayor Sullivan joined together to enter into an agreement with Mr. Carter and the Park Street area was to be the site of Na- shua's new central library. Bound Legally "We are bound legally and morally to honor this agree- ment. To break the contract now would be illogical and mo- rally irresponsible; also, in my opinion, such action could be construed as a breach of an enforceable contract. Such ac- tion might give Mr. Carter grounds for legal proceedings to recover his gift, should he wish to do so. Further, it would be .irresponsible as far as the citizens of Nashua are con- cerned to deprive them of this wonderful educational facility by rejecting this additional gift of from Mr. Carter. "Second: As a result of the initial gift from Mr. Carter, the bond issue passed by the Board of Aldermen and the contract entered into by the city of Nashua, the city was the recipient from the State Library Commission of a grant of from federal funds, contingent, however, upon the awarding of a contract to build the new li- brary no later than April 17, 1970. Rules Require Editor's note: In a letter dated last Nov. IV State Li- brarian Emil W. Allen Jr., wrote, "The rules of the federal government require that the contract for construction be awarded within one year of the approval of the project by the State Library Commission. This means that in the case of Na- shua, the contract must be awarded no later than April 17, 1970. If this is not done, the federal grant will lapse." "Third: In reliance upon Mr. Unknown Expenses Cited by Sullivan. By CLAUDEXTE DUBOCHER Doubts Mayor Dennis J. Sullivan expressed last week over acceptance of the supplementary offer by Eliot A. Carter for construction of the new library turned into a veto today. derwrite a costly long-range, non- FRANK B. CLANCY Carter's gift, the joint commit- tee has already expended the sum of for purchases of land in the Park Street area; almost all of the land required for library construction has now been acquired. "Fourth: Plans, drawings and specifications for the new li- brary are almost complete; has been expended to date for architects' fees on serv- ices rendered at the Park Street site. "Fifth, the sum of has already been expended for fees on real estate appraisals, consultant and engineering services and miscellaneous items at the Park Street site. "Sixth: After study extended PARK STREET Page Gives In a veto message sent to City Clerk lionel Guilbert, Sullivan said he was vetoing acceptance of the latest Carter offer because the total estimated' amount for which the city will be responsible is unknown. Acceptance of the gift, with the city to put up.a like amount by May, 1970, was approved by the aldermen last week on a 13-1 vote. How the city's matching share was to be raised was left unanswered. The veto will be submitted to the aldermen at their meeting next Tuesday where a move to override it win be made. Sullivan explained'his veto in a seven-point statement; "The total estimated amount for which the city will be re- sponsible is an unknown factor- over million Of our money has already been he said. "At the present rate we are purchasing Central Nashua to un- revenue, cultural project of which this projected library site Is only a portion." There, appears to be a definite lack of judgment here, Sullivan said. And the mayor said he feels it is his responsibility to point out that money is being spent with the "seemingly lackadaisical approval of the Park Street Beatification Committee, the joint library build- ing committee and others autho- rized to expend funds in that area." The remainder .of Sullivan's message is as follows: "A complete financial projec- tion now being prepared will sup- port my-cause lor concern. ;'JI question the gift status'of the.above resolution and that of the' previous one because of the strings attached. It has placed our city in an uncompromising position; we are being drained LIBRARY GIFT Page 2 Lunar Craft Declared 'Shipshape' Moon Landing Set For A.M. By HOWARD BENEDICT SPACE CENTER, Houston (AP) Circling the moon in perfect orbit, Apollo 12's explor- ers inspected their landing craft today and declared it "ship- shape" for a daring bullseye landing on the craggy surface early Wednesday. Charles Conrad Jr. and Alan L. Bean slipped through a con- necting tunnel into the fragile lander they call Intrepid, leav- ing Richard F. Gordon Jr. alone in the command ship Yankee Clipper. To Gp' After an 80-minute check, Bean reported: "We've checked out all the things we're sup- posed to and they're all ship- shape. We're ready They then rejoined Gordon In the command cabin and the trio settled down about a.m. for an 854-hour sleep period. Conrad and Bean hope to set Intrepid down precisely in a 400- foot-wide circle in the Ocean of Storms on the of the moon's-visible face at: a.m. -EST Wednesday. Their goal is the first deteaed. le exploration of the lunar'sur- face. Conrad and Bean inspected the landing craft six hours after Apollo 12 swept into lunar orbit which prompted outbursts of City Firemen Halt Slowdown; Negotiations Resume Tonight Negotiations to end a contract dispute which prompted Nashua firemen to picket City Hall and engage in a 24-hour slowdown will resume today at p.m. Pending the outcome of the session, the firemen voted at a special membership meeting last night to call off the slow- down and the picketing, effec- tive today. Leonard Cube, president of Local 789 of the International Association of Fire fighters, said future developments in the dis- pute will be determined by to- night's negotiations. Participating in the negotia- tions will be City Solicitor Ar- thur 0. Gormley Jr.; Fire Com- missioners John H. McLaughlin, Leo Carle and Roland LaRose; Mayor Dennis J. Sullivan; offi- cials of Local 789 and their counsel, Louis M. Janelle. The session will be held in the may- or's office at City Hall. Accuses Union Gormley at yesterday's ses- sion charged the union with act- ing prematurely and in bad faith. If the slowdown and picketing were not halted today, he said, negotiations would not resume tonight. Dube said nine of 14 unset- tled points had been resolved at the two-hour session. But Gormley said there were actually 16 points at issue and agreement had been reached on about half of them. Both agreed that a major point of disagreement was the inclusion of supervisory person- nel in the union. The fire commissioners do not want supervisory personnel as union members, the local does. Dube said it was resolved that the fire commissioners: have the authority to enter into a work .contract with the fire- men, with financial considera- tions to be subject to approval by the mayor and the alder- men. Representing the local were FIREMEN Page 2 awe and enthusiasm from all three as they gazed at the wild and wondrous landscape below. Bean shouted Mon- day night. "Boy it's beautiful down there. Look cra- ter." Through color the astronauts shared their matnift- cent view with earthllngs a quarter-million-miles away. The 30-minute telecast fol- lowed the course of Apollo 12 as It moved across a narrow band, moving .from east- to west. Large and small craters, rugged mountains and flat plains were, visible as the cam- era panned across the desolate landscape. "Even 'in earth orbit at night or in the daytime, the sky was never as black as it is Conrad reported. "This is the blackest black I ever saw." For Conrad arid Bean the view from 70 miles high was a preview for their attempt to land on the eastern shore of the Ocean of Storms. They are to separate the land- Ing craft Intrepid from the com- mand ship Yankee Clipper at p.m. tonight. For more than hours they will keep the world in. suspense as they execute maneuvers on the dan- gerous and difficult descent. Their goal is a pinpoint land- ing' near an unnamed crater, an area described by Conrad be- iora :the 'flight'-as-'gently roll- ing, pocked with small craters, but relatively The astronauts have dubbed the landing target "Pete's Park- ing Lot" because it is Conrad, the Apollo 12 commander, who must steer Intrepid to the touch- down. Using new procedures, the as- tronauts hope to overcome the MAYOR SULUVAN Kennedy Is Dead HYANNIS PORT, Mass. (AP) Joseph Patrick Kennedy, pa- triarch of an-ill-starred Ameri- can political dynasty, died to- day, losing an eight-year strug- gle for life. He was 81. In a brief announcement from the Kennedy family compound on Cape Cod overlooking Nan- tucket Sound, a family spokes- man said death came at a.m. His wife Rose and other mem- bers of the family were with him at the time, the spokesman said. A financier and one of the na- tion's wealthiest men, Kennedy had been partially paralyzed since suffering a stroke in Palm Beach, Fla., on Dec. 19, 1961. The former ambassador had suffered setbacks from time to time since then, and had been growing progressively weaker since sustaining a mild heart at- tack Saturday; Loses 3 Sons The founding father of the Ken- nedy clan suffered through the assassinations of his sons John and Robert after losing his eld- est, Joseph P. Jr., in World War II. John was killed in Dallas, Tex., Nov. 22, 1963. Robert was shot in Los Angeles June and died the next day. He had just received a boost in his cam- MOON LANDING Page 2 KENNEDY IS DEAD Page 2 Dedication to Honor Labonte '10 Chevrolets CARS TRUCKS Daily Rentals low as r day Call Teri 888-1 12! MacMulkin Chevrolet SABSVA'8 ONLY PAOTOBr AOTHOB1ZED DEALEB SKI-DOO Ski-Doo Suits Boots Trailers Sleds Accessories Parts Nashua Auto Co. Outdoor Recreation Center 282 Main Street, Nashua, N. H. Christmas Shop and win a Turkey too this week at the NASHUA MALL A granite monument in honor of Captain Roland C. Labonte of Hudson who was killed in Viet- nam War action, will be dedi- cated at the state armory here Sunday afternoon at 2. The event is open to the public. The dedicatory event was an- nounced today by Ma j. Gen. Fran- cis B. McSwiney, the adjutant general, N.H. Army National Guard. Captain Labonte was killed by enemy action last April 19, while serving as liaison officer with the 3rd Battalion, 197th Artillery, in Long Khanh Province, South Vietnam. General McSwiney said that since his death, the Officers' Can- didate School at the state mili- tary Reservation in Concord, has been renamed in hir memory. TONIGHT IN THE TELEGRAPH FUEL OIL SAVE MORE With LORDEN OIL CO. INC. SBRVJNO NASHUA AND 8UBEOTJNDING TOWNS 465-2267 Abby Anderson 14 Comics Crossword Editorial Financial Horoscope Lawrence 29 Lewis Nashua Scene 4 Obituaries 2 Snorts 18, 19 Suburban Television 19 Theaters 19 Dr. Thosteson 20 Weather 2 RICH'S SELF-SERVICE DEPARTMENT STORE RT. 101-A West, NASHUA Pork Free! Amherer St. (Milford Junction of Everett Turnpike 4-DAY THANKSGIVING SALE STARTS 10 am. TOMORROW (IF YOU HAVEN'T RECEIVED OUR 12 PAGE MAILER, WE HAVE ONE HERE IN OUR 116 STORE JUST FOR YOUI) SNOWMOBILES New Authorized DEALER For MOTO-SKI ARCTIC CAT Trailers Accessories SALES SERVICE BUD TATE'S 74 W. Hallis St. On Way to Hyannisporf Jacqueline Onassis arrives in Boston on the-way to'Hyannisport, Mass., where her one-time father-in- law, Joseph P. Kennedy, died today. Mrs. Onassis flew from Greece via London. (AP 5% DAILY INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY ON 90 DAY NOTICE ACCOUNTS AT NASHUA TRUST COMPANY ANTIQUING KITS AVAILABLE Full Line of Colors S H Grttn Nashua Wallpaper Co. 19 W. Pearl St. I Hon. thru Sat. OpenTbun. till   

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