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Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: November 4, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - November 4, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle Marriage Isn't a word, it's' a Kntence. 1 i i -nejw rMMpMHw w EV9MM9 Ntwspoptr Weather Clearing Tonight Cooler Wednesday VOL 101 NO. 209 Ccnttraiini tht New Hampshire EtUbUshed October M, 118 NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE. TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 4, 1969 Second Class Postage Paid 22 PASES Price TEN CENTS 3-Man Mayoral Race Attracts Heavy Vote By CLAUDETTE DUKOCHER Drawn by a three-way, top-of-the-ballot race for mayor, Nashua voters surged to the polls this morning and a still heavier stream was expected just before closing time late this afternoon. All wards, except Wards 4 and 5, reported uninter- rupted, brisk activity since the polls opened at 6 a. m, In Wards 4 and 5, moderators described early morn- ing voter response as slow but the pace picked up later. Predict Tlgbt Finish 555 out of eligible voters The polls will close at p. m. had cast their ballot. The first and most ward workers predicted THE VOTE AT J O'CLOCK You've Got a Long Way, Baby ;Kathy Daniels, little more than a year old; is a bit skeptical of both the voting procedure and the photographer as Tier parents, Harold and Beverly Dan- iels; 14 Kerry Lane, cast ballots in the city election. The Daniels, who voted at Crowiey School, Ward 8, were among thousands of Nashuans who made the trip to polls today. (Telegraphoto-HarrJgan) a close outcome for the main bal- lot contest in which Mayor Den- nis J. Sullivan is opposed for a third term by Housing Code Di- rector: Philip J. McLaughlin and County Commissioner Armand A. Beaulieu. By 1 o'clock an estimated had exercised their voting privil- ege, compared to at the same, time in the 1967 municipal election. Overcast but mild weather en- couraged heavy voter turnout and a last spurt of campaign activi- ties. Voters had to run a friendly gantlet of last-minute election- eering handouts and posters at each ward to reach the polling booth. But moderators noted no complaints. Ward-by-ward activities were as follows: WARD 1-Clerk Edward Hut- chins-reported that by a.m., man to vote was David W. El- dredge, 3 Dover St., ward mod- erator, and candidate for ward alderman. Eldredge yielded his duties as moderator to George Flewelling to avoid a conflict of interest- Alva Kerouac, 11 Bris- tol St., was the first woman to vote. WARD 2 Moderator Rupert Kimball rep'orted the first vot- ers as Mr and Mrs. Louis Rec- ord Jr., 9 Reservoir St. By 9.15, 460 ballots had been slipped into the holding box. -There are eligible voters in this ward. WARD 3-Hoss Michaud, 118 Lock St., and Walter B. Matte, 5 Santerre St, were the early- bird, voters in this ward By 9 30, 522 out of eligible voters had marked their ballots. The moderator is Alfred Jean. WARD voting pattern in this ward was reported as on "the slow side" by Modera- tor Peter Cote., There: are Ward Ward Ward Ward Ward Ward Ward. Ward Ward One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine 1967 962 922 901 448 612 782 979 997 7605 1969 1092 927 914 590 597 850 792 1298 1100 8160 names on the check list and by about 300 had voted.- The first man and woman- to >vote were Kay and Clarence Patten; 7 Temple Place. WARD 5-About 390 had voted at 10 30 out of eligible voters. The first man to .cast a ballot was Oscar Baillargeon, 371 West Holhs St, and the first woman, Rita Aussait, 200 West Pearl St Handling the modera- tor's duties is Roland Bouchard WARD 6 Mrs Charlotte Greenwood reported a heavy and steady voter flow at the polls. At 10, 450 residents had been checked off as -having voted out of a total eligibility list of The first voters were John and Cecelia Wmn, 12 Middle St WARD Moderator Paul Du- quette said 400 residents had passed through the voting booths by 9 30, out of eligi- ble to vote Ronald Simoneau, 69 Spaldmg St., candidate for ward alderman, and Paulette Beaulieu, 85 King St daughter of mayoral candidate Armand A Beaulieu, were the first to vote WARD This populous ward reported that 50 voters had filed through during the first 10 min- utes the polls were opened and 200 during the first hour. By CITY ELECTION Page 2 Stands Firm On Orderly Viet Pullout .V By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- dent Nixon says he has worked out with South Vietnam "an or- derly scheduled timetable" for witbdrawali.of all U.S. combat troops from Vietnam but may have to revise it if Ha- noi "significantly" escalates the war. "I have Chosen a plan- for Nixon told a national television audience Monday believe succeed. "If it does succeed, what the critics: say now will-not matter. If.it does not succeed, anything I say.then will not He disclosed'he had under- taken several' secret.: contacts with North Vietnam to try to break the stalemate in the Pans peace talks.. These Included, a .personal let- lateiHo Chi rtjrih in which' he urgid reso- Ho replied, shortly before his death Sept. 3, with 'demand for settlement on his terms, and this initiative, like all the oth- ers, failed. Against this background Nix- on, after reviewing the history of the war, focused his speech on turning'the'conflict over to the South thus gradually disengaging Ameri- can ground combat forces until all can be brought home. For this plan he asked'sup- port, particularly the support of "the great silent majority of my fellow Americans 1 The speech, as White House contitaed no spectacular hew proposals, anflf his critics were quick to Jump on this point. Senator Albert Gore, D-Terin, called for early hearings on the war by the Sen- ate Foreign Relations Commit- which had been deferred pending the speech. But Republican leaders and some Democrats'hailed Nixon's presentation as pointing, the way toward presidential press secretary Ronald L. Zie- gler said the White House Finance Committee Favors Acceptance of Library Gift JL The aldermanic finance com- mittee last night unanimously .recommended passage of a: re- solution to accept the supplementary library gift of- fered by Eliot A. Carter. city would have to match -the gift, according to stipulations listed. And the committee also au- thorized the police, department" to apply for a federal grant to undertake a study of police sta- tion needs. In voting for the; library reso- lution, Mayor Dennis J..'Sulli- van, finance committee chair-.; man, qualified his vote by sayr ipg he wished to'have City "So- licitor ArthurO. Gormley Jr. clarify some of the conditions attached to the latest-offer. Student Intent Specifically, Sullivan asked that a clause which would bind the city to, meet all conditions outlined in the two Carter dona- tions by January, 1971, be studied as tp intent. The mayor said he was un- certain that the city could meet all conditions by that time. Also discussed was the possi- bility of holding a meeting with the aldermen early next week to brief them on the latest plans for the library. The committee was. informed that City Planner Fred D. Me- arranged to have four representatives -of the De- partment of Housing and Urban Development meet with: city of- ficials Nov.' 12 to discuss federal programs for rehabilitation of the Park-Temple Streets area. This meeting is a result of a meeting here Oct. 17 of a num- ber of federal officials to dis- cuss the possibility of getting: federal'ajd for the cultural com- plex project. The, to accept the latest Carter library offer'will toe returning to Bdard of Aldermen' for final approval Nov. 12. Appearing before the commit- tee to request authorization to .TONIGHT'-IN THE TELEGRAPH Abby Anderson Baker Classifieds- RICH'S Camera Department Turnpike Plan KODA COLOR 126-12 ex with processing ONLY Comics Cromley. Crossword Editorial Financial Horoscope 18 to 21 Lawrence 4 Nashua Scene 4 Obituaries 2 Sports Suburban Television Theaters M Weather 2 Lewis 4 12-13 17 17 applyrfor a federal grant to study the. expansion needs of the police department .were Chief Paul J..Tracy and Sgt. Everett Costa. Cost Estimated The cost of the study, they said, would amount to with the city's share to be The aldermen authorized a transfer from surplus to cover the city's share, with the transfer to be made by resolution. Federal funds for the study, Tracy said, will be made avail- able by the Governor's Crime Commission which is in charge of disbursing'funds made avail- able to the state by the Omni- bus Crime Bill. In other the commit- tee awarded a three-year con- tract for snow removal in mu- nicipal parking lots to Bob Lo- zeau Inc. for per year. Voting against the contract award was Alderman-at-Large Francis LaFlamme who favored Nashua Tree Service. The latter firm, had bid per inch of snow removed and the Lozeau firm" had bid per inch. Nashua Tree Service, how- ever, had not bid on a flat price basis, one of two bidding meth- LIBRARY GIFT Page! switchboard was jammed with calls praising the speech. :Nixon laid the failure to make any .progress in the .peace talks was entirely the .fault of the ene? my, he specified how the war- had nevertheless been scaled down on both sides. As to the future, Nixon said- "We have adopted a plan which we have worked out in cooperation with the South Viet- namese for the'complete, with- drawal of all U S. ground com- bat forces and their replace- ment by South Vietnamese forces on an orderly scheduled timetable As South Viet- namese forces become stronger, the rate of American withdraw- al can become greater Nixon did hot detail either the dates in his timetable or the to- tal of troops to be brought home. Administration officials say the withdrawal rate will go up in 1970, and speculation is that pull backs during the year may total or if there are no upsets. Nixon argued his plan had-to remain: secret because he must adjust it to conditions in South Vietnam and possible progress at Paris. He said the progress in training South Vietnamese troops plus a decline in enemy infiltration and offensive action had enabled him to make a "more optimistic" withdrawal schedule now than he made last June. At the same time-he declared that "if the level of enemy ac- 'tivirjr significantly inoreasesvwa might have to adjust our tirneta- bte accordingly" And in words specifically directed to Hanoi he issued this Warning: "If I conclude that increased enemy action jeopardizes our remaining forces in shall not hesitate to take strong and effective measures to deal with that situation." Throughout the first major address, on Vietnam since May appealed for support by the American people for the course he is fol- lowing Since he ot fellow citizens' disagree with the plan for peace I have his main effort evi- dently was to reinforce the backing he has and win any ad- ditional support possible. Speech Timed Nixon's speech was timed ap- proximately to the anniversary of the 1, President Lyndon B. Johnson PRESIDENT Page 2 RICHARD M. NIXON Hanoi Mounts More Raids But Fullback Plan Remains FUEL OIL SAVE MORE With LORDEN OIL CO. INC. SERVING NASHUA AND gUBBOUMDING TOWNS 465-2267 5% DAILY INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY ON 90 DAY NOTICE ACCOUNTS AT NASHUA TRUST COMPANY .Why vork'for a week.when you; can well over. a week for yourself ai a nib-con, tractor. will help let you'up.' 6. M. PLUMBING-HEATING OIL CO., INC. Call 424-5196 or MM7M SNOWMOBILES New Authorized DEALER For CAT Trailers Accessories SALES SERVICE BUD TATE'S 74 W. Hollii St. KM7H LEWIS B. HERSHEY Hershey Boosted To Full General The Senate on Monday confirmed the nomination of Lt. Gen. Lewis B. Her- shey as a full general. Her- shey is being replaced as director of the Selective Service System, according to an earlier announcement by President Full Line Of ARWSUPPLIES fyr Professional or Amateur S ft H Green Stamps Nashua Wallpaper Co. HIW. PeariSt 8M-MW Mori, thru Open Thin, 'til I By GEORGE ESPER SAIGON (AP) North Viet- namese troops launched their heaviest ground attacks in two months Tuesday, some 12 hours before President Nixon said that a "significant" increase in ene- my activity might force him to stretch out his timetable for withdrawal of U-S. troops. However, an official U.S. source said the current upsurge in enemy attacks, which began last weekend in the central highlands, didn't appear to .be sufficient to slow the withdraw- al program. U.S. and South Vietnamese headquarters reported at least 45 enemy rocket and mortar at- tacks during the night; and in- fantry assaults on .four Ameri- can bases north of Saigon, an American niehtjnvouac in the central highlands, and two South Vietnamese positions in the southern' central highlands. Loses Heavily The enemy lost heavily in the ground attacks, with the allied commands claiming 180 killed, while allied casualties were four Americans and five South Viet- namese killed, 61 Americans and 12 South Vietnamese wounded, plus 23 Americans wounded in the shellings. The Americans captured seven North Vietnamese.in the fight- ing north of Saigon; "I think what the President is talking about is whether or not they launch something that would be relatively large said the U.S. source. said all antici- pated that in the immediate fu- ture they, would continue the a low level of action with periodic peaks, as opposed to a sustained offen- sive. I think President Nixon is thinking in those terms." The attacks were the heaviest since the night of Sept. 5-6, when the enemy shelled more than 100 bases and towns and launched several ground at- tacks. This was during the final "highpoint" of the enemy's fall campaign. A spokesman for the U.S. Command, noting that the night's attacks were not coun- trywide, termed them a "high- point" in the 3rd Corps area, which includes Saigon and the 11 provinces around it. "We feel this is part of the Communist s' winter cam- Infant Girl Abandoned At Rectory HENNIKER, N.H. (AP) Police today sought the mother of.a newborn infant girl left on the doorstep of a Roman Catho- lic church rectory Monday. The girl, temporarily named "Baby was being tended to in a hospital in Man- chester. Henniker Police Chie) Thom- as Hassler said the infant was discovered by St. Theresa's Parish pastor, The Rev. Fran- cis Butlef. The housekeeper at the rec- tory, Helen David, also a nurse, attended to the child before a physician arrived. Mrs. David said the child was wrapped in a woman's skirt. She put it in an oven which was transported to the hospital. Father Butler said he re- ceived a telephone call from an unidentified woman who said she was about to leave some- thing for the nuns. said one official source'." This may be a push. We .don't know." It's too early to tell. We have said all along the Communists are preparing for a winter campaign. We have al- 'ways maintained the enemy has not stopped fighting but has pulled back to prepare for a winter-spring offensive." The Saigon government re- ported 47 Vietnamese civilians were killed, 107 were wounded and 47 were kidnaped by Viet Cong terrorists in the week end- ing Oct. 29. Spokesmen said this was a 24 per cent drop from the previous week, when 104 civil- ians were killed, 197 wounded and 48 kidnaped. The spokesmen said Viet Cong terror incidents have been reported this year, with Vietnamese civilians killed, wounded 'and kid- naped. The government also an- nounced that Viet Cong or HANOI RAIDS Page 2 Telegraph Plans Full Coverage Of City Election The Telegraph will again pro- vide its readers with complete coverage of Nashua's election re- sults. Tonight, it will place bulletins in its windows as ward tabula- tions are received. The newspa- per plans a full, detailed cover- age of the results. Be sure to get your Telegraph Wednesday so that you can read and analyze the voting trends, ward-by-ward, on several close contests. 1970 AUTO SHOW 'STARTS TOMORROW ;otthe NASHUA MALL '70 Chevrolets CARS TRUCKS Daily Rentals as low as per day Call Teri 888-1121 MacMulkin Chevrolet NASHUA'S ONLY FAOToiFl AUTHORIZED DKALEB SKI-DOO SU-Doo Suits ft Boolt Trailers ft SMs Accessories ft Parti Nashua Auto Co   

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