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Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: September 20, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - September 20, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle Perfume Saleswoman to customer: "This one has been banned by Planned Parent- hood." Weather Cool Tonight Warmer Sunday New HeimpiMrt's Largtst Evening Newspaper VOL. 101 NO. 171 Continuing the New Hampshire Telegraph Established October NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20. 1969 Second Class Postage Pa5d At Nashua, N. a 20 PAGES PficrTEN CENTS 64 Killed In Air Collision Over Da Nang DA NANG, Vietnam (AP) A U. S. Air Force jet fighter and an Air Vietnam 104 passenger _p1ane collided over the Da Nang airfield today and initial reports said 61 persons aboard the 104 or on the ground were killed. Americans Survive Bolh Americans in the F4 Phantom jet navi- gator parachuted safely and the jdlat managed to land the dam- aged fighter-bomber on the air- "Several of these were men and women who were on (he ground working in the he said. He added that all of the vie ims appeared to be Viel u.w.i u.t......J at an altitude of about 300 feet and that the four- engine propeller plane ripped Into a patch of rice paddies and cultivated fields just 200 yards from the densely populated vil- lage of Hao Vang. U.S. and South Vietnamese rescue learns rushed to the site. The passenger plane was flying to Da Nang from Saigon. Earlier reports from helicop- ter crewmen who flew over the crash site said they had seen people moving away from the wreckage. AV-Adams of New York City, the Hoa Vang district adviser, tald rescue teams bodies. counted 64 ____.... fuselage and wreckage was slrewn over a 100-yard sec- tion of torn earth. There were indications that a fire had brok- en out in the cockpit area, he said. South Vietnamese police said some of the bodies were burned. The passenger plane crashed a mi'e noithwest of the air base. U. S. Air Force, Marine and Army fire-fighting units and rescue teams arrived minutes atter the accident occurred at 4 p.m. A U. S. soldier working at the air base said he looked up mo- ments after the accident and saw the DC4 veer sharply to the right. Police-Enforced Dog Leash Law Planned In Edward Devlin, president of the Nashua League of .Craftsmen, is care- ful but quick ori wheel. Devlin begins this'turn of events when he plops a glob'of clay, onto the .wheel and sticks his thumb'intothe middle of it vessel-to his satisfaction by .various' finger and thumb manipulations, winds a string .around the base of the wet material and pulls it to remove the finished- piece from the wheel. Devlin's craft is only one of many performed at the League's establishment here. .Other photos, story on Page 3. (Telegraphoto-Harrigan) Allies In Viet Chart Policy Course _..... r. ..vji Turn's. talks ifart on the limitations of nuclear By Claudette Durocher. Nashua may have a ca- nine leash law as of Jan. 1, 1970 with the police de- partment in charge of its enforcement. An ordinance to this, ef- fect endorsed by the five-member dog control study on the agenda for a first reading >y the Board of Aldermen Tuesday night. Measure Stipulates The measure would make it unlawful to permit any dog to run at large off the premises of its owner "and not under a leash less than six feet long controlled by the owner or a responsible person." Under the dog control ordi- nance presently on the books, no dog can be permitted to run at large off the premises of its owner if not under the control of the owner or a responsible person. But the law does not state that the dog must be kept nitiated the move to have the police department in charge of enforcing the dog control ordi- nance. on a leash. Enforcement of By LEWIS GUUCK UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (AP) Foreign affairs leaders of the seven allies with troops in South Vietnam net today to chart their general policy course for the months ahead. Possible further troop with- drawals and diplomatic moves were up for discussion by'the foreign-ministers as they con- vened at the U.S. mission head- quarters at the United Nations. "I think we can look ahead and map out a rough program for the next few New Zealand's Prime minister, Keith Hojyoake, toW newsmen as the meeting be- gan. Holyoake and the Foreign Min- ister Carlos Romulo of the Philip- pines both applauded President Nixon's announcement this week to bring U.S. troop pullouts to men by mid-December. "Anything that de-escalates the war in Vietnam the Philippines' Romulo said. The foreign minis'ters'from rfi- lions contributing 'troops. to the al- lied side in Vietnam met a'fter-the Soviet Union called on them to renourice'their "aggressive war." Secretary of State William P. Rogers is host lor the seven-na- tion conference. Later he meets with Israeli Foreign Minister Abba Eban, then joins foreign ministers from the Soviet Un- ion, France and Britain for din- ner with U. N. Secretary Gener al UThant. The morning' session, at the headquarters of the UlS; mift sion to the United the -foreign affairs :chiefs 'from the United South Viet- e ne a South Hanoi to ,vi iifciniTiJ-tana net and the Paris peace talks start on the limitations of nuclear have remained deadlocked. offensive and defensive weapons, rw, lln'ifpH Na- He reiterated, however, that the buffed-President .Nixon's plea the day --before -to; -help, "persuade .U.Thant said such.talks should the Philippines, New Soother.bejipd- ie review'of :Uie wir Wort" The last one was held-in; May, In Bangkok, Thailand. Since' then, President 'Nixon has ordered two U: S.: troop with- drawals totaling the war has gone into of a' lull. North Vietnam's President Ho Chi Jfinh has died, South Vietnam has reshuffled its, cabi- New Ordinances Spell Out Restrictions on Junk Yards hood Sept. Two ordinances to restrict es- tablishment of junk yards are headed for a first reading by the Board of AWermen Tuesday night in the wake of a junk yard con- troversy in the Elgin Street area. Both measures are sponsored by Ward 8 Alderman Robert A. Dion. The ftrsl ordinance would per- mit establishment cf Junk yards in light and heavy industrial dis- tricts only if the yard is com- pletely enclosed by a solid fence six feet in height and by permit by the Zoning Board of Adjustment Sets Conditions The ZBA would prescribe the conditions under which special permits would be granted, taking into account the nature and de- velopment of surrounding prop- erty and whether the use of the proposed location would affect the public health and safety be- cause of offensive OT unhealthy odors or smoke. The second ordinance would require that any junk yard which does not conform to restrictions of the pertinent zoning district would be required to sewre a special permit from the ZBA a year after the ordinance takes ef- fect. A public hearing win be re- quired on both ordinances before approval can be considered. At present, the only restriction placed upon establishment of a junk yard in a light industrial dis- trict is that the yard be enclosed by a solid fence six feet high. There is none mentioned in thejtween the Merrimack River, and heavy industrial district regula- the B M raJrpad tacks m Iheavy industrial district which per- ''Womirts no agenda for the meeting .this One of the participants, Ifew Zealand's Keilh Holyoke, followed Gromyko in the.U. N. General Assembly policy debate Friday and defended the allied position. He said the allies have made fair, offers at Paris while nego- tiators for-the other side have responded -only '.'the de- mands of seek to im- pose their will by force." Gromyko Denponces. Gromyko denounced ,what he portrayed against the Vietnamese, praised Moscow's aid to Hanoi arid tie Viet Cong- and defended their peace proposals. U.S. diplomats said Gromykb's speech was not harsh-intone but i'progress. The secretary-general's, appea was made as part of his annual re- port to the assembly. It came as Rogers and Gromyko prepared for meetings next week to discuss arms limitations and other topics. On the Middle East, Gromyko denounced "Israel's obstruction of any steps-toward a political settlement." But Israeli .minister Eban countered this charge in a "The Soviet Union played a sin- ister, role in the developments leading up to the. 1967 war" and "Mr. Gromyko's speech, this morn- ing reveals no intention to deparj tolc Theiunk yard in the Elan Street I mils such a use. speech was not harsh in .lone but the of a Letehbor- 1 But the district abuts an A Res- neither did it show much promise at Te'idSn-al District, which incudes for a breakthrough in outstanduig anicmeeting. Elgin Street The 'neighborhood East-West _ Issues.' _ amc raeeuue- ,tn.. mav nnmivko made no direct reply tpu The yard in question was recent- ly established on land situated De- fears operations at the yard may impair the environment Gromyko made no direct reply to U.S." proposals for an early PIZZA by Charles Famous thruout New England 147 W. PEARL ST. Finest in Pizzas Grinders (all varieties) Regular 90c PLAIN PIZZA TUESDAY ONLY e 88M542 11 A.M. to 2 A.M. Mem.'thru Sat. 3 P.M. o law, a source of constant com plaint since its enactment in .954, is up to a dog officer who s appointed by the mayor and confirmed by the aldermen. He and the mayor are re sponsible with providing an ade- quate dog pound but under this arrangement the city has suf- fered from a lack of permanent pound facilities.. ll Initiates Move; Mayor Dennis J. Sullivan New Tribe Found in Jungle; Appears Living in Stone Age jjje assembly attitudes, Eban proposed that United Na- tions Day, Oct. 24, be proclaimed a day of universal in Vietnam, Nigeria, the Middle East, along the. Soviet-Chinese border and elsewhere, to provide "a moment of serenity" that might help peace efforts. An Arab spokesman Iraqi dele- gate Tari El Erris said, "Eban's statement was mere rhetoric." Vehicle Mishaps Listed by Police Three motor vehicle mishaps were reported by'Nashua po- lice during the past 24 hours, none of them resulting in any- personal Friday injury, at a.m., Mrs. Irene Morneau; 51, of 126 Kins ley St., reported that her car had" been in 'collision with a bicycle being ridden by Scott Mitchell, 11, of 69 Alder Dr. The boy was unhurt. At p. m., in the Rich's Shopping Center parking-lot the vehicles of Mrs. Grace M Brown, 64, of 7 Bennett St. and Wayne E. Foster, of 7 La bine St., collided. Today, at a.m., a car being driven by Warren J. Too- hig, 37, of JO Vesper Lane, lef the Everett Turnpike near Hiv ier College, when the driver reportedly lost control. It was towed back police said. Announces Drqf f Call Cuf s President Nixon, left, announces he's canceled draft calls for November and December and ordered the Octo- ber inductions to be spread over a three-month period. Secretary of De- fense Melvin Laird is at his side at the Present's White House briefing. (AP Wirephoto) Custom Framing by Experts at reasonable rates plus Green Stamps at Nashua Wallpaper Co. 12S W. Pearl St. 682-9491 ,Hon..thru Sat, Open Thurt. 'til t NASHUA TRUST has ho p p i I y been paying daily interest en 5% Time Deposit accounts since 1967. UEKBEB Comics Crossword Editorial Financial Horoscope Lawrence TONIGHT IN THE TELEGRAPH Obituaries Abby Anderson Church Classifieds H to 19 19-11 10 4 6 7 4 Teen Television Theaters Weather Women's Paw JJASHUA'8 OXLT FACTOBT AUTHORIZED DEALER SKI-DOO SW-Doo Suits Boots Trailers Sleds Accessories Parts Nashua Auto Co. Outdoor Recreation Center 28J Main Street, Nashua, N. H. He said this arrangement these conditions for would promote better enforce- of impounded dogs: irient of the ordinance by A dog bearing a iding closer supervision of the lag may be redeemed by tM. AH thraa ria vc mr dog officer. The dog control committee was named several months ago 0[ maintenance costs, o study the overall aog bearing no ngs of'the dog control could be redeemed by any gram. It-is composed of-Alder- person upca payment of the 6 Inilal ftllic men Robert A. Dion, chairman, nml Sherman Horton Jr., Leo mainlenance costs. Coutermarsh, Raymond L. Be-j _ A iog wnicll is chard and Alderman-at-Large ,jeemed wiihin seven the present notified of potmdment by mail. Sets Conditions The new ordinance would sel [owner, or after.three.days by. francis LaFlamme. Changes in the control ordi- nance that it proposes are'the result of conferences held with he police commissioners who agreed to take over the dog control program providing hey.get adequate staffing and acuities.' It Js now proposed that the police commissioners, with the assistance of the police chief, will select a suitable place for confinement.of impounded ani- mals. Employes of the police de- partment would be designated !o pick up and impound any it ray dogs found in the city. The proposed ordinance wouK require that the breed, color and sex of any stray impounded shall be recorded along with whether it bears a'license tag -If: the has a license tag the owner would have to be KM day] a hu a -J Dr.Thosteson 15 Marines from the Colombian Navy. They found the village and peach palms and '69 Chevrolets CARS t TRUCKS Daily Rentals as low as 'per" day Call Teri 888-1121 MacMulMn Chevrolet Some of the Marines went .in language, used by the hostages. It may be, Caneiro said, that they are survivors of the thought to have become ertinct a half century ago. The evidence does not establish' without doubt the present use of stone tools by this tribe, Caneiro said.' He himself has found such tools in villages where their had ceased years ago. However, those tribesmen appear to have been isolated so long that, if they obtained metal, they may have long since been unable to it and reverted to stone imple- ments. The hostages were returnee' to their villase some time July 20. The place then seemed deserted. The language of the Yuri, for which three word lists were prer pared before they seemingly be- came extinct, was a subject pi linguistic controversy. Sane said it was related to the Orib.' tongues, others argued for a link to the Arawak family of langu- ages. Caneiro leans to the that the language has no rcla- In any case, he said in a report to the Smithsonian Institution, "They are probably in as nearly an aborignial condition as caa be found today.'' Ex-Football Coach Cleared in Slaying BOSTON (AP) Frank Con- way, J7, oi Dover, N.H., a for- mer assistant football coach at the University of New Hamp- shire, has been cleared on a charge of murder in the shoot- ing death of a South End youth. Judge Joseph Gorrasi found no' probable cause to hold Con- on the murder charge after who was ac- a Munjcipa] court hearing Fri- detachment of j... day. However, Judge Gorrasi con The murder charge related to the death of Sirauel Bailey, 37, in a shooting early on the morn- ing of Aug. 21. Another youlh, Henry C. Jones, 19, was wound- ed in the hand. Conn-ay testified he was seat- ed in his car with a woman at S a.m. when the woman whistled and two youths appeared with knives. The defendant said he thought he was the victim of a mugging attempt and pulled his gun out from under the seat. In a strug- gle that followed, he said, four shots were fired and one of youths wrested the gun away and fired a shot at him. Conway said he acquired gun several years ago when was i member of the Florida Highway Patrol. Jones denied that he had a knife. PARK FREE SHOP SATURDAYS All Day In Downtown Nashua close to 304 businesses to choose from ____ FUEL OIL SAVE MORE With IORDFN OIL CO. INC. 465-2267   

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