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Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: September 11, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - September 11, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle Hie three swiftest means V of communication: Telegraph, telephone and tell a woman. VOL 101 NO. 163 v Wear Somewhot Warmer Friday 4 FuH New HMtpWn Tetecrapb EftabbBed October M. 1W NEW; HAMPSHIRE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER II, I W Postan Paid ll 26 PASES Dump Truck Stages Sit-Down Strike This Park-Recreation being used to haul gravel from Tinker.Road to -Artillery. Pond behind Holman Stadium for two new softball fields, suddenly sat down on the job. Superintendent Edwin Schroeder said the fill being hauled Contained some clay and.a lot of water from heavy rains, causing the truck to point its nose towards the sky.- when workers tried to dump the load. The vehicle was lowered and back on the job-, within minutes. (Tdegraphoto-Harriganj) _ By GEORGE ESPEB SAIGON can enemy; ;toces stepped.up operations'to- day following the end of .a truce that had quieted the for three Meet EMM? Drive ,.._. ,.U.S. spokesmen .said Ameri- can military' activity. ;wu', in: creased to meet an "enemy. Inl- Uative'V thit included 17 rocket and morUr attacks and two assaults''shortly, after the 1 a Jn.. Viet Cone cease-fire for; the funeral-.'of North .Vietnamese President Ho Qif Minh. MosT In the; area from to the Cambodian border. The -rocket and mortar' at- wounded 51 Americans, US headquarters said. Four other Americans and enemy loops vere reported killed and 16 Americans wounded in iround fighting in the first U lours after the cease-fire. of .'ene- my activity from yesterday, but we.do.not consider it. a.high- said- a spokesman for he U.S.- Command.'It's a clear resumption' of -what they; have been dotog-befor'e their cease- fire. .up; some, v about is Bwch as'the'y'are'ln'thejevd of activity. It's, pretty .much' to meet initiative." Oil Firms Lease Alaska's Fields BylOMBBlLEY ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) The world's giant petroleum firms have set up more than bids for leases on -Alaska's North Slope oil, fields, and the money goes to work to- day- drawing almost 000 daily interest for the ''state: 'Fiiuces Alaska piled up in the ode hour of sealed bidding Wednes- day J100 mffiioo. more than it had spent In the 10 years once It entered the union. GOT. Keith Miller and other state officials said the windfall would pat Alaska on the road lo financing many needs. Giant combines involving such billionaires as J. Paul Get- ty and H. L. Hunt submitted ap- parent high bids on the choice tracts close' to three discovery wells on the coast of the Arctic temperatures hit freezing on the day of the big- gest oil lease sale in VS. histo- ry.' state hadvthe waning checks Down by chartered jet   agree." TONIGHT IN .THE TELEGRAPH Abbr Anderson Biossat Ctassifeds Cornier Crossword Editorial. Fmanda! horoscope Jl Lawrence Lewis Obituaries Nashua Scene 4 Sports 18, li Suburban' 15 Televisioo Theaters Dr.-Thosteson It Weather FUEL OIL SAVE MORE With (LORDENOIICO.-INC. SfSVJSO NASHUA AND OCTTDmO TOWS8 465-2267. PIZZA by Charles; famous thniout New England 1C W.' PEARL ST. Grinders (aD .varieties) v PLAIN PIZZA 'TUESDAY -ONLY W-4542 Dptn II A.M. to 2 A.M. MOM. thru -Sit. million for one acre lease. That was per acre, the largest per acre bid ever offered for U.S. oil land. .The Getty and Hunt interests combined with 'Amerada-Hess Oil Louisiana-Land and Ex- ploration Co. and Marathon Oil Co.1 on "-the record' single- bid. lives .in Hunt .'in Dallas; The successrul bidders had to pot1 op per in cash and must'come through with the rest in 18 days. Tfie money on the'table at the Himierpal Audttorfanr was 'in the form of bonus bids The state Is allowed under its own laws' to collect only 11 per acre per year for oil lands, but the law prohibit oil compa- nies'from Eweetenlng the pot with as much one-time money per acre as they wish Express Caution State executives expressed caution in handling the windfall Republican GOT. Idler said it Is Important "that we wisely use._the money from nonrenew- able resources to assure" the continuing success of renewable fishing and tourism." v t it The final unofficial tolal of afn parent high bids was figure almost certain tb'change vKh'iome bid rejections. The bid tabulating and reading took alt day. "A tot ol ui have said stale' Natural Resources Commissioner Tom Kelly, it's the s The nioneyihe state received will be invested in US. Treas ury, securities, The securities will back. Lup 18.5, million .worth of bonds, tie state expects to sell nextweek to bmkl Ughways, auports, fish >'jcBooi and a But the million isn't all Alaska' geUpit'receivM'iifc per cent royalty en 'all oil and gas taken .out of its fields. "The'Increase' of''activity 'on both sides of the war today, ile'not yet of inajor propor- ttons, appeared to dim pros- pects for an'extended 'scaling- down of -Allied military opera- tions.7 had been-specula- Con that'the cease-fire might be tacitly extended. bo'ndocting combat.as- saults, offensive said; one '-U.S. field V officer. "We're reacting to -intelligence reports with reconnaissance, in force operations..We've got as many combat assaults as in any day during the week before the cease-fire." A, spokesman for the US. Command said there, "are five announced American opera- tions, none of which terminat- ed There was no way of know- ing how.many imanrMmiced op- erations are going on South. Vietnamese forces re- ported 4t operations of battalion size or larger under way today and'sald in signifi- cant contacts. Government soldiers reported killing 81 enemy'soldiers in two Tights to "the north and south of Saigon after the cease-fire end- ed. Four South Vietnamese sol- diers' were-reported killed and 23 wounded. With the end of the cease-fire, American B52 'bombers re- turned "to" targets'In South'Viet- nam after-concentrating on the infiltration trails through, east- ern Laos Twenty of the big bombers dropped more than 500 tons of explosives between 1 ajn. and 3 p m-, and three- fourths of the attacks were in an area miles southwest of Da Nang where there had -been scattered fighting throughout the truce. The1 'cease-fire, which .U.S.- forces' honored 'without a truce declaration, and'. South Viet- namese forces shattered'by at least (7-actions Initiated by the. eoeraji Allied headquarters reported. The U.S. Command said were attacks on In which seven ud TJ. enemy were kilted 'and Americans wounded.' South -Vietnamese' headquar- ters By GORDON GAUSS GRAND; VALLEY, Colo. (AP) An .underground nuclear, ei: plosion equal-in force to tons jarred.'westem Col- orado Wednesday. But whether it shook a billion dollars: worth of natural gas .free from buried rock formations'remains to be seen next spring. The' Atomic1 Energy Commis- sion said no. radioactivity es- caped into the atmosphere. After six days of weather- caused delay, the blast went off scheduled hour despite about 60 objectors who marched into the observation tent-vrhile predetonation: ceremonies were in progress: The protesters, .mostly, from the resort community of Aspen and the town of Cedaredge, said they'feared the blast'and a pos- sible flurry of contaminated gas later .would release a radioac- tive form 'of hydrogen caued tnfanm mfo the atmosphere and then into the food chain. Shakes Spectators The'ground at the observation from the .'blast, surged upward enough shake spectators s' when the charge went off, then'jiggled, al" seconds. Diist clouds', along the crest of the mountains for 111 miles or more One big cloud marked a landslide Ugh up on one mountain, t r A few rocks tumbled down on highways which had been blocked to prevent any mishaps. The blast: was felt in Grand Junction, 40 miles, southwest, but no damage was reported. A few miles farther, away a shop- keeper at Colorado National Monument said cans were shak- en from a shelf. Colorado School of Mines'at Golden recorded the Wast on a seismograph and listed It at 5.S on the Richter scale, ah earth- quake intensity, capable of in- Clcting damage when centered on an inhabited area. The explosion, named Project Rulison for a long-vanished vil- lage, was' the ment's Plowshare program to find peaceful uses' for atomic energy- The million blast was touched of to determine wheth- er underground fission can gas in commercial volume from sandstone. Area Caucuses Scheduled For Senate Election Oct. 21 By CLAUDETTE .DUKOCHER .Republican Barry lACener and Democrat Mrs. JeanlWaum said today they had "no com- ment" on reports they are inter- ested In being candidates for" the state' Senate seat vacated'by Creeley Buchanan of Amberst A special election (o fill the vacancy is set for Oct 21. Cau- cuses to dect delegates to', can- didate selection conventions wi be heH throughout- Senate dis- trict U Friday through Monday Oerier, an' alderman, is a res dent of Ward J and Mrs, Wallm, low. Tide of Field's Grove The-water.level'of Salmon Brook took a sharp drop recently, as this photo of field's Grove, which the brook runs through, depicts. Officials of the City Engineer's Department said the drop was due to the opening of dams so that workmen at Simoncau i Plaza couH make final connections of water piping in reasonably dry areas. (Telegraphoto-Andruskevich) Goming sopn to Nashua Trust MASTER CHARGE The Interbank Card 1 REWARD for the return of Grant's shopping carts by Friday, September 12th to .the New Grontfs Store, Simoneou Plozo. Grant's corts ore easily recognized by the and j. Grant; imprint. a state .representative-, and a Board of Education member, livra In Ward 1 .These are the only .two Nashua wards which will participate m the special election, together witi Amherst, Brooklme, Greenfield, Hollis, Lyndeborough, Mason, Mont Ver- nob, Temple and wntonT Republicans seeking their party nomination to run in the election include IVed Porter, Amherst GOP chairman; Harold R. Watson of Merriiiack" and1 Rep. Malcoha M. Carter of' IHford. On the Democratic side. Select- man Edward It Codey of Green- field; Richard Nashua auto dealer who lives in Moot Vernon; and Mrs. Walhn are men- tioned as potential candidates. The' nomination procedure for the {pedal election calls for Re- CAUCUSES Pace) Educational Fund To Aid; Children Of Crash Victims HOLUS An educational fund for the children of Mr.'and Mrs.- Deane'C. Simpson, killed in as ar crash on Tuesday-has been started by Hollis tilizens. Those who wish to contribute o this fund, may do so by ing their gift (o Mrs. lOukier, treasurer, Box tit. Hoi- is. J The Simpsons, who recently moved to Worcester from Houis, were killed Tuesday in a head-on ollision on Route 101 in Am- icrst. of Hollis for many years, they were Uw par- nts of seven children: Alan, a reshman at the University of Yew Hampshire; Andrew, a stu- ent at Hirairi College in hio; Julie, who completed her ophomore Saint lary Seminary; Nancy] an eighth grade pupil; the Misses Susuma nd Joanne, both of Boston; and Uaric, a rnarried too who lives in New York. 5 WALLPAPER SALE j SELECTION PLUS StH Greed SUmfe Nashua Wallpaper Co. Pearl St.   

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