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Nashua Telegraph: Monday, September 8, 1969 - Page 1

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - September 8, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                1 Today's Chuckle Marriage is like the army everyone complains, but you'd be surprised at how many re-enlist Hampshire's Largest Evening Ntwspaper.. Weather Drizzly, Cool Tonight. Little Change Full Report on Two VOL. 101 NO. 160 Continuing .tie New Hifflphire Telefrtpb EsUblished Octobtr 24, 1KU NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER t, 1949 Second Class Postage At Nashua. N. E 24 PAGES TEN CENTS Manchester Teachers Scott Likely Choice To Succeed Dirksen uari i. WASHINGTON Sen. Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania stands as the likeliest immediate suc-.cessor to GOP Leader Everett M. Dirksen, but a power struggle over the next 16 months may determine the ultimate leader of Senate Republicans. Elected Whip Scott was elected assistant GOP leader, or whip, by a acting party leader last week when Dirksen was hospitalized. With Dirksen's deal Sunday, Scolt is considered certain lo seek the post on a ful lime basis. But Sen. Gordon 'Allot! of Colorado, a conservative' who serves as chairman of the Senate Republican Policy Committee, made clear last week he expected a share of leadership duties durins Dirksen's illness. Allott, 62, could become a ri- Senators Pause In Last Tribute To 'the 'Old By WALTER R. MEARS WASHINGTON (AP) Ever- ett McKinley Dirksen, he of the tangled mane, the rumbling bass voice which could sooth or taunt or plead, is dead at 73, and the Senate is pausing in tribute to the man who for a decade was leader of its Repub- lican minority. At the peak of his power, dur- ing two Democratic administra- tions, the senator from Illinois fashioned that minority, and his own talent for oratory, drama and political maneuver, into a force which made him one of Washington's most influential figures. Dirksen, ever the showman, was perhaps the best known of senators. "He was an old said Senate Democratic Leader Mike announcing the Sen- ate would forgo business toda: to do honor to Diricsen, who diec Sunday at Walter Reed Army Hospital, five days after an op- eration for lung cancer. Medical announcements hai Indicated he was progressing to- ward recovery. But on Sunday he suffered a cardiac and res piratory arrest Two hours of ef forts at resuscitation proved fu tile, and Dirksen died at p.m. EOT. Nixon Praises President Nixon called Dirk sen a giant in the history of Con gress, a great American, a warm personal friend. "To poli- tics arid government he brough a dedication matched by few and a style and eloquence matched by no political leader in our the President said "He had his greatest moments as the leader of the loyal opposi- tion." The White House said Nixon expects lo attend the funeral. Mansfield said he hopes most ol the Senate will, too. The funeral is to be held at the National Presbyterian Church, and Dirksen's body is to lie in state for one day at the rotunda of the Capitol. He wil! be buried in his hometown, Pe- kin, HI. Final, detailed arrangements were to be made today. Members of Congress, offi- cials and leaders of both parties joined In praising Dirksen and in expressing sympathy to his widow, his daughter, Danlce, and his son-in-law, Sen. Howard H. Baker, R-Tenn. Mansfield said as Democratic leader, he had enjoyed a perfect relationship with his Republican counterpart. "His word was FUEL OIL SAVE MORE With LORDEN OIL CO. IHC. SERVIXO NASHUA AND SCBROUNDI.NO TOWNS 465-2267 PIZZA by Charles Famous thruout New England 147 W. PEARL ST. Finest in Pizzas Grinders (all varieties) Regular 90c PLAIN PIZZA TUESDAY ONLY TtUphon. W-4542 11 A.M. to 2 A.M. Men. thru Sat. Sundays 3 P.M. to val to Scolt for the top job, or a candidate for whip. But whoever moves into the minority leader's front-row desk and inherits his.spacious, rfian- deliered office just off the Sen- ate floor is unlikely to have the power and force Dirksen had accumulated in his 10-year lead- ership. For one thing, the position Is less important now with a Re- publican in the White House than it was during Democratic administrations. Unlike the Democrats, whose leader Mike Mansfield is also lead of the party's policy com- mittee and conference, the Re- lublicans have a more frag- mented set-up. Thus, a collective leadership s possible until a strong man merges, possibly not until after he 1970 congressional elections which could give Republicans control of the Senate'for the first time in 16 years. The choice will be made by the 42 Republican senators- plus Dirksen's successor if he is appointed by a party conference. But .Sen. Margaret Chase Smith of Maine, the conference chairman, declined I to say how soon this might take1 place. When Scott defeated Sen: Ro man Hruska of Nebraska, a close ally of In wha was primarily a liberal-conserv ative fight for the whip's job, most of the younger Senate Re- publicans supported Scott. While they might back the 48- year-old Pennsyhranian for the leadership now, they are likely to leave their options open for the start of the next Congress in January 197L.. _ Less than a majority of GOP On Job Contract Ratified; 3-Day Strike Ends MANCHESTER, N. H. (AP) About pupils in New Hampshire's largest city returned to class today as all 28 schools opened with a full complement of teachers who struck last week in a contract dispute.-; The city's 705 teachers ratified a new one-year tract Sunday night, clearing the way for a return to the classrooms most of them boycotted last week. Vale Is Unanimous The voice vote lo accept (fill new contract was unanimous. The city aldermen earlier had voted lo restore they had cut from a contract negotiated by the school committee and Allies To Pace Enemy SAIGON (AP) -The U.S. and Sisters for a Week Catherine Zanknkowsky of Nash-. Though .Catliy didn't finish in the ua, New Hampshire, poses. ,rn6ney, Miss New Jersey did tie for her "traveling. sister" Cheryl Carter, Miss New Jersey, following one.of the programs held at Conven- tion Hall in Atlantic City, N.J. Cathy second-runner-up honors in the Miss America Pageant and received Miss Neat as a Pin award. SEN. DIRKSEN Mansfield said. "Every thing was on the table." Former President Lyndon B who often found Dirk sen a valued ally' on the Senat sent a private message o condolence to Mrs. Dirksen. Dirksen's death left two vita vacancies in the Senate: that o Republican floor leader, am that of senator from Illinois. Sen. Hugh Scolt of Pennsylva nia, 68, is likely to succeed I [he minority leadership on an interim basis. The decision wi) be made at a conference of 4: remaining Republican senators They will, presumably, be ioined by a 43rd Republican when GOP Gov. Richard B Ogilrie of Illinois appoints i new senator. Scott, who had been deputy minority leader or whip, was designated acting Republican eader after Dirksen was hospi lalized. Dirksen, who was elected to lis fourth Senate term less than a year ago, had suffered repeat- ed illnesses, frequently requir- ng hospitalization. He blamed recurrent stomach and intesti- nal disturbances on tension. He also suffered from a bleeding ul- cer, a pinched nerve in his >ack, and emphysema, a lung ailment. He constantly puffed ciga- rettes, tried to quit but never succeeded, often borrowed a smoke from a colleague, an aide or a reporter. It was when Johnson and the ate John F. Kennedy were in the White House that Dirksen's lower was at its pinnacle. Dent ocratic presidents came to' him eeking the votes they needed or key proposals. Republican Nixon often urned to other al- hough Dirksen retained ample xilitical muscle, among some of the Senate's more liberal -Republi- accused Dirksen of ob- Iructionism, and there was guarded corridor talk of an ventual attempt to displace the ader. EXCELS SESSION senators now, their ranks then might be augmented as in Loyal To Party Although Scott supported Wet York Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller for the GOP GREG ANDRUSKEVICH most tremendous week nomination against Nixon, he ever hsd." a loyal party man who servec as national party chairman two decades ago and has been an administration stalwart In the is how Catherine Zanich-kowsky, of Nashua, New Hampshire's representative in the Miss America Pageant summed up her after a hectic week of A more long-range with 49 other girls for the leadership is Sen. the coveted Miss America title. B. Pearson of Kansas, a Pamela Anne Eldred, 21, year-old moderate who Michigan, was crowned the the administration in the Miss America before a na- ballistic missile television audience Satur- Sen. Robert P. Griffin night at Convention Hall in Michigan, 45, challenged City, N.J. The ror the policy chairmanship America Scholarship prize' January but was defeated. awarded to the new queen er possibilities include morning "at 'the red John G. Tower of Texas, 43, Room of Haddon conservative who heads the where a farewell breakfast ty's senatorial campaign held. I mittee, and Howard H. the 50 girls who participated fr. of Tennessee, also 43, the week-long event, afl the] moderate who was and anxieties were following the scholarship. More Units For City's By CUUDETTE McKee, consulting engineers, The Nashua Housing Boston, will brief both boards would be empowered to seek cost estimates and other as- federal planning grant for peels of the depollution project construction of 100 more low-rent The firm has completed engineer- apartments for the elderly under ing plans for the a resolution to be given a Erst Mayor Dennis J. Sullivan, reading by the aldermen tomor- chairman, is the sponsor of raw grant resolution. Also coming up for a first the housing grant ing is a resolution authorizing is Alderman Leo H. plication for federal funds to chairman of an ilement depollution plans for committee that Jashua and Mcrrimack as liaison with the. NHA. The funds would be used to Site Specified pand the sewage treatment plant iff Sawmill Road and to lay in-erceptor sewers along site for the low-rent proj- cct is specified in the proposed grant application. LT6TS. After its meeting, which will start at 8 p.m., the Board of weeks ago, Noel E. 'lante, NHA chairman, said the dermen will meet with the Board w" j, >f Public Works. in lne new 100-apartment and going into the final night still hadn't pronounced it right. He didn't have to say- it Saturday night. Cathy did have disappoint- ment. That was not being able to see her parents and aunt and un- cle Saturday at the conclusion of late last night and began her! As for present plans Cathy duties as a secretary, aiming to catch-up on her work at Improved Machinery Corpora- and get some, well deserved rest, tion. Though finished with things come first, however, pageant, Cathy still faces a busy and that means unpacking to- presentation. Girls hugged their new found friends and threw their arms around their families whom they were not able to speak to for the entire week. Returns to Job Cathy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. announced today that Allied mi! itary operations would be scaled to match the enemy's during the Viet Cong's three-day cease-fire in mourning for Chi Minh. The joint South Vietnamese- American communique tacitly ac cepted the three-day truce al though it declared: "It is no our intention to talk about a cease-fire at this time." The communique confirmed earlier reports that the :alliec forces were in a "defensive pos lure" but patrols were contin 1 uing to intercept any enemy at tempt to build up troops anc In-power closer to Allied bases The joint communique said: "The scale of our military op- erations in the past has been in- fluenced by the scale of enemy military operations. During this period the scope of our military operations wiU likewise be in fluenced by the nature of enemy military operations.; The Communist announce ment of. a" cease-fire be viewed in the Hght of the savage rocket attacks against civilians in Da Nang, and other aggres- sive, actions .which .have .fol lowed the announcement. I must also be viewed in the lighl of the known history of past Communist violations of cease- fires which they themselves had proposed. Consequently it is not 3ur intention to talk about cease-fires at this time." American B52 bombing raids previously scheduled for targets n South Vietnam were diverted :o attack North Vietnamese in- lltration trails through Laos, in- 'ormed sources said. One radio message heard in the field from an American company commander to his top sergeant said; "The thing is to- day we'll have sort of a cease- Ire in our hostile actions. We don't want lo lake anything un- der fire unless it's absolutely necessary." iround the state as Miss New, lampshire. Cathy said this morning that redfshe was pleased with the results. 'It's hard to express my feelings, jut I'm not totally disappointed that I didn't get the title. If I did. Manchester Education Associa- tion, which provided a pay scale ranging from to with 5 per cent annual increase] in 12 steps. The three-day strike wal. marked by the city's efforts'to keep the schools open with vol- unteers and a series of court actions. At the high point, the city managed to open 15 of the city'l 22 elementary schools but was forced to keep the three high schools and junior high school! shut down. The city obtained a tempor- ary restraining order from a Superior Court which ordered the teachers to go to work, but which the teachers voted last Wednesday to ignore. The teachers association lost a bid to have the state court throw out the restraining order, and top MEA officials were called to a Superior Court tearing last Friday to answer charges of contempt of Justice George Grant hell MEA Executive Secretary Nor- man Pettigrew in contempt ordered him to jail but then re- eased him.on his own recogni- zance. Jack Middleton, attorney for the MEA, told the teachers Sun- day night that City Solicitor J. Francis Roche and Philip Pet- ers, counsel for the school ward, had agreed that "no leacher will suffer any penalties :or the days spent away from :he classroom, and we will drop any contemplated court action against the city" and that ity would drop any court ac- ion. TONIGHT IN THE TELEGRAPH Abby Anderson Biossat Hassifieds 19.20, 23 Comics 18 Cook '4 Crossword 19 Editorial 4 Tnancial Lawrence Obituaries Social Sports Suburban 10. 11 Joroscope Taylor Television Theaters 4 19 18 Dr. Thosteson 9 Weather Wicker 2 13 ca, CaBiy said, "Pam tly suited for the life traveling daily. She doesn't min< traveling and loves to meet peo- ple." During her stay in Atlantic City Cathy was impressed by the hun- dreds of people who assisted the girls. "They treated the girls as thej said Cathy, "and not some- thing with just a crown." Cathy also commented that Bert of ceremonies for the pageant, "was one of the nicest men I've met." Parks seemed to have a problem in pro- nouncing Cathy's name correctly Pije i Representatives of Camp, Dres- MORE IJMTS 2 Marines Sent To Other Bases PORTSMOUTH, N.H. (AP) Two Marines being held at the Portsmouth Navy Yard on charges related to anti-war pro- tests have been sent to other bases. The Pentagon has announced that Pvt. George Daniels and Pvt. William Harvey, both of S'ew York, have been sent re- spectively to Quantico, Vi. and Coming soon to Nashua Trust MASTER CHARGE TJie Interbank Card Member F. D. I. C Page 1 Newport, R.t. REWARD for the return of Grant's shopping carts by Friday, September 12th to the New Grant's Store, Simoneau Plaza. Grant's carts are easily recognized by the orange handle and the W. T. Grant imprint. Dr. Pike's Body Recovered From Ledge Near Dead Sea By RONALD THOMSON JERUSALEM (AP) Dr. James A. Pike, who lost his bat- tle with the Judean desert which he had hoped would yield a full- er meaning of Christianity for him, "did not fear death and nor he is at peace." The words came from his 31- year-old third wife Diane after the body of the former Episco- pal bishop of California was re- covered from a ledge of a deep canyon Sunday. 'spot was Iwo miles from where she had !eft him to go for aid last Mon- day night. "TJiere was no more appropri- ate place for Jim to die, If he had to said Mrs. Pike. She I old newsmen her 56-year-old lusband remarked before the} set out on the trip: "If I die will be happy and al peace." The.Pikes came to the Holy .and to do research for a book on the life of Christ. "And now Jim has died in the 'lace where Jesus found conso- she said. "The book must be finished. My brother nd I will do It. It will be a me- morial to Jim." DO IT YOURSELF ANTIQUING SUPPLIES It's Easy! It's Fun! Plus Green Stamps Nashua Wallpaper Co. W. Pearl St 882-M91 Open Thurs. Til 9 Dead Sea Scrolls were found 29 years ago. Police Inspector Salman Aba Yaman said Pike apparently was trying to climb out of canyon and fell about 80 feet to the ledge. An Israeli pathologist said Pike apparently died instantly from the fall and had been dead two lo five days. Pike, a late comer to the Episcopal faith, was a contro- versial figure much of his cleri- cal life. Charges of heresy had been leveled at him by some of his associates. Born 3 Roman Catholic, became an agnostic in 1932 after studying for two years with the Jesuits at the University of San; 13 Clara, Calif. He went on earn a law degree at Yale and became an attorney for the Fed- eral Securities and Exchangii Mrs. Pike said she would re- Commission, main in Israel for a few more Sometime during these years; days and would make funeral he was married for the first of his friendf never learned her name or dates of the marriage and the annulment. See, Bedouin trackers and army! Pike married the second volunteers spent six days comb- in 1942 lo Esther Yanovsky by arrangements alter she talked time but never spoke with her husband's relatives in marriage. Even close the United Stales. Comb Wasteland Search parties of Israeli ng the wasteland where the NASHUA'S ONLY TACTOHT AUTHORIZED DEALER SKI-DOO SM-Doo Suits Ic Boots Trailers Sleds Accessories Parts Nashua Auto Co. Outdoor Recreation Center 282 Main Street, Nashua, N. H. whom he had four children. '69 CARS i TRUCKS Daily Rentals as low as per day Call Teri 888-1121 MacMulkin Chevrolet   

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