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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - August 29, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle When you look into a woman's purse vou realize that money isn't everything. VOL 101 NO. Nashua Celeoraph New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspaper C J 1 Weather Tonight, Foir and Warm Saturday, Cloudy, Cooler Full Report on Page Two Continuing tie Hampshire Established October X. 3S3J NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE. FRIDAY. AUGUST 194? Second Class Postage Paid At Nashua. N.H. 24 PAGES P.ici CENTS Whether the local water supply shall be fluoridated is a question beaded for a eitj-uide vote ia the Nov. 4 municipal election, the iNashui Committee for Dental Health (XCDH) announced today The committee, composed of laymen and dentists con- cerned about denial health. adopted a recommendation of the Nashua District Dental Society Troops To Have Time Off CONCORD, N.H. (AP) The 400 men of the 197lh Artillery, New Hampshire National Guard unit reluming home from Vietaam Thursday, will be given at least three days off be- fore they are to report to Ft. Devens, Mass., for demobiliza- tion. The returning troops include1 about 1M area members of Nashua Battery B. A letler signed by 1S3 mem- bers of the unit criliciied a proposed demobilization thai would hare allowed them only one hour with their fam- ilies from the time they at Pease Air Force Base in Portsmouth until they would have boarded buses for Ft. Devens. The letter was sent to Presi- dent Nixon, New Hampshire's Congressional delegation, the slate's news media and Gov. Walter Peterson. A spokesman at the state ad- jutant general's office said the original plan was changed be- fore the protest letler was writ- ten. The first flight is to arrive at 1 a.m. four others will follow during the day with the last C-141 jet transport scheduled to arrive at 2 p.m. The men will be off until Sunday night before reporting to Ft. Devenj Jor the three to five day demobilization routine. list night thai tie city's water system be fluoridated. Malting recommendation on behalf of the dental society was Dr. Arthur SIcGonagle, i lotal dentist Fluoridation Drive Launched About 35 persons attended Uw NCDH meeting in tie Chamber of Commerce building here to heir Dr. McGonagle state the advan- tages of fhioridation. Bertrand J. Bouchard smed is acting chiirmin in tie absence of Dr. Maurice Dumas, chairman. Under state law, the city derk must jut the fluoridation question on referendum upon the written application of five per cent, or 300 or more of the voters, whichever is the lesser. And Bouchard said today the committee is sure of getting the reqiured number of signatures to Fbcto oa Faje 1 put the issue to referendum in the Xovember election. The NCDH, he said, has author- ufd Dr. Dumas lo form a group lo inform and educate the pubh'c on fluoridation and to help bring about its adoption by the city. Fluoridalion, Dr. McGonagle said, "is the best way we have About 500 New Hampshire Guardsmen went to Vietnam last Seplember. About 100 have already returned. GUARDSMEN Page J to fight dental decay. It hdps everyone, including the under privileged" Hmjr Work Load Nashua dentists, he said, ire "snowed under- by their patient case loads despite the use of high sped equipment and the long hours they put in. A sis-month waiting list for treatment a not uncommon, he said. Many programs to aid the un- der privileged to get better den- Ul care are being formulated. Dr. McGocajle poinlcd out "These programs are he said, -but they add many more patients cpon dentists can't candle tneir case loads now." He emphasized that many com- munities. Including some in New Hampshire, have naturally fluori- dated witfr. Local examples of communities having naturally fluoridated wa- ter, he said, ire Amherst. Hollis and Brookline where fluoride lev- els from four-tenlhs to out part per million. Studies have shown that one part per million the dental society recommends (or Nash- ua, Dr. McGonagle saH, can re- duce tooth decay by up to (J per cent if administered to an individual from birth through hi5 years of looth development Rocky Driving Ahead Large stones litter this street, one of several which residents of the Lincoln Park subdivision are demanding the city pave before winter. The city claims the developer, Rodgers Brothers Builders Inc., has failed to meet street acceptance standards. Tounng the area yesterday was City Engineer James F. Hogan who said the stones are far bigger than the city allows for grading purposes. (Telegraphoto-Hamgan) Crewmen Alive, N. Korea Says By K. C. HWAJs'G cordance with past practices" if chopper was downed near Kuuv vwuauic pasi pidiuces ii cnopper was downed near NUQV PANMUN JOM, K o r e a lhe Americans admitted "crimi- chon. about 15 miles north of iP __ nallv" tha flUtt (AP North Korea said today all three American helicopter crewmen who were shot down Aug. 17 are alive and offered to ex- change them for a confes- sion and apologies from Washington. Listed As Injured At a meeting of the Korean Armistice Commis.-ioa, the chief North Korean representa- tive said Capt. David H. Craw- ford of Pooler, Ga., and Spec. 4 Herman E. Hofstalter of Low- point. III., were seriously in- jured. He said WO JIalcom V. Loepke, lhe pilot, of Richmond, Ind., was slightly Injured. The North Korean delegate, Haj. Gen. Lee Choon-Sun, said doctors are treating there, but he gave no further information on Iheir condition. He said North Korea would return "ia ac- 4 Marine Companies Battle Reds By GEORGE ESPER SAIGON (AP) Four compa- nies of U.S. Marines fought their way up a hillside through a stream of enemy gunfire Thursday in the foothills south- west of Da Nang. After nearly two weeks of hard fighting in the sector, at least 72 Ameri- cans and 645 North Vietnamese thickly settled ccastal lowlands. were reported killed. A battalion of the 7th Marine Regiment .advanced against North Vietnamese firing from fortified bunkers. Marine larks reinforced the foot soldiers in the fight to keep the North Viet- namese from breaking into the Wanted Hudson Man Freed After Posting Bail LAS V K G A S, Nev. (AP) agent for New Hampshire Insur George Gilbert, of N.H., wanted in Massachusetts in connection with the death of his wife three years ago, is free on bail today. Bail for Gilbert, 48, was set j July 31 on the grounds lhat Mas- sachuselts authorities had not supplied the necessary papers. Officials said the bail money was posted Thursday by an TONIGHT IN THE TELEGRAPH Abby 18 Baker 5 Classifieds 19. Z) Comics Cromlcy Crossword Editorial Financial Horoscope Lawrence Nashua Scene 4 Obituaries 2 Pearson 4 Social 12. 13 Sports 15, 17 Suburban 14, 15 Taylor Television Thcalers Dr. Thosteson 11 Weather 2 ance Co. Gilbert and his wife, Mary, 36, isappeared in September 1966, on a boating trip off lhe coast of Gloucester, Mass. Body Recovered Her body was found by a fish- erman nine months later. Gil- bert wasn't reported seen again until last February when he was found dazed on a North Las Ve- gas road. Gilbert had been freed July 20 when a judge had ruled 3 war- rant was signed improperly in Massachusetts. He turned him- self in July 22 after it was signed again. Gov. Paul Laxalt had ordered extradition, but because of the two day release extradition pro- ceedings must be gone through again. Justice of the Peace Roy TVoofter had said. In granting baa, that Massachusetts had provided no papers showing Gil- '69 Chevrolets Daily Rentals as low as r day Coll Teri 888-1121 MacMulkin Chevrolet PIZZA by Charles Famous throout New England W. PEABL ST. Finest in Pizzas Grinders (all varieties) Regular 90c PLAIN PIZZA TUESDAY ONLY m-4542 11 A.M. lo 2 A.M. Mon. 3 P.M. to i bert -was charged wilh a crime punishable bydealh or life im- prisonment. In Nevada, bond must be set if this i; not the penalty. Road Deaths Rise to JI2 DOVER, N.H. (AP) New Hampshire's highway fatality toll for lhe year today stood at 112 wilh the death of Chrislos Kafkas, 83, ol Dover. Kafka, died in a hospital in Dover Thursday shortly after being struck by an automobile while he crossed Porlland Aven- e. The driver of the car was Id- entified by police as John Wide, M, of Chatham, N.J. Police said tiro of the three passengers in the car were In- jured by flying glass. Americans were killed and 65 wounded in Thursday's fighting. Twenty-three North Vietnamese were reported killed. Suffer Casualties In the valley beneath the hill, a company from the 196th Light Infantry Brigade linked up with a Marine company. But about 150 yards away another 75 men from the brigade suffered 30 per cent killed and 22 a five-hour fight, and only five North Viet- namese were reported killed. A Marine helicopter crashed near the fighting, but a U.S. spokesman said mechanica [rouble brought it down rather than enemy fire. Three Ameri- cans were seriously injured, and eight others suffered minor nally" sending the ____ cojter over North Korea. Lee apparently was referring to the arrangement under which North Korea released two other American helicopter crewmen in 1961, a year after Ihey were shol down on Slay 17. 1963. The North Koreans returned them afler lhe U.N. Command signed a document admilling Ihey were spying, then repudialed lhe confession as soon as the men were returned. The same proce- dure was followed to get the Pueblo crew back last Decem- ber. U.S. Contends Once again U.S. officials con- lend that the helicopter pilot lost his way and flew into North Korean air space by mistake. But Ihere was no indication [rom the U.S. representative on the armistice commission. Ma- rine Gen. Arthur H. Ad- ams, how soon a similar confes- i- demilitarized zone between North and South Korea. Ted's Wife Loses Baby HYANN1S. Mass. (AP> Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's Joan has lost the baby she was expecting in February. A spokesman at Cape Cod Hospital said today she was in good condition, resting comfort- ably and probably would remain in the hospilal for a couple of days. The spokesman said Mrs. Kennedy had undergone minor surgery which is usually routint in miscarriages. Mrs. Kennedy, who Hill be 33 next Tuesday, was taken to hospital shortly before 8 p.m. Thursday by her sisters-in-law Elhcl Kennedy and Mrs. Ste- sion-apology and then repudia- phcn Smith, tion might be forthcoming. 1 The senator, who was on an After the North Korean nego- overnight camping trip to Nan- tiator admitted lhal the men tucket Island off the were alive bul injured, Adams requested their immediate re- sells coasl, flew lo Hyannri when notified of his wife's mij- injuries. A small Army observation helicopter also was shot down 19 miles northwest of Saigon, wounding two crewmen. The losses raised to the number of American helicopters lost in the war. Elsewhere in Vietnam: Just below the demilitarized zone. North Vietnamese troops attacked bivouadng U.S. Ma- rines Thursday night. Six North Vietnamese soldiers and three Marines where killed, and nine Marines were wounded. U.S. headquarters said there were JI enemy rocket and mor- tar attacks from 8 a.m. Thurs- day until 8 a.m. today, and Jl Americans were wounded. A U.S. Army spokesman an- nounced- Thursday that (o have been a tvi iiii-tuvai II C4 LltlCIll, ULH Lee rejected this. Green Berets in South seems that your side is not will gel a new commander eight now are confined prepared to receive lhe urday, Col, Michael D. at Long Binh, 12 the North Ko- former commander of the of Saigon, waiting said, "and you are in no Infantry Division's 1st U.S. Com.and to to discuss the mailer He will succeed Col. they will be brought der Lemberes, who was A 1 I J J temporary commander afler Col. Robert B. Rheault and seven other Green Berets were arrested last month on charges of murdering a South Army said Healy is a masler parachutist who was with the Spelial Forces in Germany in H57 and in Vietnam in U.N. command said earlier that the helicopter was on a routine training flight from Uijongbu, just north of Seoul, and that lhe pilot radioed he was lost. North Korea said the Area Election Set Oct. For Vacant Senatorial The date for a special and that a savings in Mason, Merrimack, Mil- to fill the vacancy In the expenses by lhe cily Mont Vernon, Temple and senatorial district, caused [he resignation of Sen. feel slrongly that the usual procedure for lhe S. Buchanan of Amherst, has been set for Oct. 21. by the the special election should have been set for Nov. 1 to to choose their nominees is for the party organizations in ecutive Council, according lo Councilor Bernard A. with lhe Nashua city election. This would save the wards and lowns lo call special caucuses to elect delegates Jr., of money as it party conventions. The cho- Streeter said thai he requested the dale of Nov. 4 for the special election in order to require it to hold two elections (in Wards 1 and 2) during a two-week time delegates will meet al party conventions lo choose their nominees. cide with lhe regular to the mentioned as city election but was must be a minimum of candidales arc House 3-2 on an amendment by Councilor Robert Whalen of from the day the special election is set by the Majority Leader Webster Bridges Jr. of Brookline; My p r o p o s a I Malcolm Carter of Mil- Whalen said he felt that special slale eleclions should not involved days instead ol the 53-day wait which Rep. Harold Watson of Merrimack and Amherst Repub- held on the same date as finally Chairman Frederick Port- partisan city elections of confusion which might result. Streeter countered with the Uth senatorial district includes Wards 1 and 2 of Democrat polrnllals include Richard Sexton of Mont Vemon that the dale proposed was Amhersl, Rep. Jean Wallin of Nash- days from the Nashua Hoi 111, mt. Her __.._ 11 JJUILI1VU Ul MIA M I1C turn for medical treatment, butlcarriage. He stayed at her bed side for some lime. The Kennedys have three chil- S, Edward if. Jr., 7, and Patrick Joseph, 1. Mrs. Kennedy had miscar- riages in May 19S3 and May latest pregnancy was made known about a month ago, the night Sen. Kennedy went on national television to comment J on his conduct after lhe auto ac- cident which took the life cf Mary Jo Kopcchne. An inquest into the accident is scheduled to open nest Wednesday. Mrs. Kennedy originally had planned to accompany her hus- band and the others on Iheir camping trip Thursday, a fami- ly friend reported, but felt Ul and decided to slay home. Others making the trip wilh the senator included his cousin Joseph Gargan; Rep. John Cul- ver of Iowa, a former classmate at Harvard; Mrs. Culver; ths senator's two older children; and John F. Kennedy Jr., son of the late president. New Stretch Of 495 Set to Open Interstate Route the outer bell, Bill be open for traffic its entire 88-mile length at 8 a.m., tomorrow. Completed slightly ahead ol schedule was an eight-mile stretch from Main Street in Hopkinlon lo Route 126 in Bdlingham. Favor. able weather was cited ai reason for the early completion, This directly affects Labor Day vacationers to and from Cod. v U.S. Doubts Soviets Will Hit Peking's A-Complex have surfaced them as part of a lions could break cut through ._....... By HKDRICK SMITH York Timn lln WASHINGTON The Slate Department indicated last night it saw little likelihood of a So- viet air strike against Commu- nist China's nuclear facilities but acknowledged that It had heard rumors that Moscow had sounded out Communist sup- porters elsewhere on lhe mat- ter. The Central Inlelligence Agen- cy was understood to have taken more seriously the re ports that the Russians had dis- creetly asked Communist lead- ers. In Europe, what their re- action would be lo a pre-emp- tive Soviet air strike against Peking's nuclear facilities. Officials in both agencies are said to consider these reports a] authentic. Bol some believe that pro Moscow Communist sources may have deliberately surfaced them as part of a psychological warfare cam- paign against Peking, rather than ai an indication of Mos- cow's aclual military plans. Wkh border tensions and clashes belween the Soviet Union and Communist China increasing in rcc'enl rnonlhs, of- ficials here no longer dismiss the chance that war belween lhe two Communist ra- RICH'S Camera Department ANNOUNCES a complete stock of all new RCA Cassette Tapes: "Sound of and other favorite Cassette Tapes now available from al New Hampshire's largest Cassette Center. TURNPIKE PLAZA AMHERST ST. Noshuo, New Hampshire tions could break out through miscalculation. At least one important Inlel- ligence official, for eiample, reportedly used lo rate lhe chances of z major conflict be- tween the two powen as about one i. ten, but he recently in- dk.iw ifiat the chancw may rj.w at nearly 50-50. .Tie factor in this changing assessment, officialj have Indi- cated, are the reports Coming soon to Nashua Trust MASTER CHARGE The Interbank Card Member F. D. I. C Slale Department officials lerrn them only "rumors" lhat the Russians sounded out K a s t Kiwpean leaiert and West Kuropean Communist Party of- ficials during lhe World Com- munist meeting in Moscow in June about their reaction lo a possible Soviet air attack against China's atomic arms complex. Nonetheless, Secretary of State William P. Rogers said In a talk wilh summer internes on Aug. 20 lhat the besl judg- ment of diplomatic specialists was that the border skirmishing would continue but neither Mos- cow nor Peking would launch an all-out war. A Slale Department spokes- man said that wai still tht "considered Judgment" of the department. V. S. DOIBTS FOREST RIDGE St. IOI-A N.H. Now rtntlng I, 2 3 Bedroom Apartment! with tit conditioning and carpeting from monthly Agint on Call 883-7752 LOCATED DEEP AMID TREES ON RouU IOI-A at Turnpike Exit 7W Pate We Carry A FULL LINE of CABOTS Stains Points Nashua Wallpaper Co. 129 W. Pearl St. 88J-W91 Hon. thru Sat. to Open Thuis. Til t   

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