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Nashua Telegraph: Saturday, August 23, 1969 - Page 1

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - August 23, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle The way some girts break date is by going out with him. Nashua New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspaper Weather Cool Tonight Sunny, Hot Sunday Full Report on Page Two VOL 101 NO. 149 Contonlnj New Himpshire Triejrjpi Established October Camillas Toll Nearing 400 Ry THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Hurricane Camille is dead but the awesome, task of searching for its victims turned today to the sea off the Mississippi coast and the mountainous areas of Virginia. The toll stood at nearly 400 dead, with hundreds missing and feared dead. Property damage soared into the hundreds of mil- lions of dollar-. Buried Deep I mainland, broke up Friday in Isat Casabry, Civil Defense the far reaches of the North At- coordinator, for the Mississippi lantic. coastal strip, estimated that :15 The storm had merged wilh a persons perished. He said it system olf Newfound-' believed Ibat "more bodies and had lost all buried in.the beach of a tropical itorm, the' ied deep where they'll Hurricane Center in never be ifound." 'Miami reported. "We've, already pulled some Debbie. To Weaken bodies out of the water andj Hurricane Debbie, mean- there's no telling how many while, churned past Bermuda more have been swept out to moving northeast into the Atlan- Cassibry added. jtic at JO miles ?er hour. Its 110- In Virginia, where winds should begin NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, SATURDAY, AUGUST 2J. 194? spawned Dash flooding, there, were CO known dead with more than UO missing. "H appears-that perhaps at least 100 of our citizens have lost tlieir Gov. Mills B. Godwin Jr. said after surveying the mountainous western part of Virginia. Hardest hit was Kelson Coun- ty, an agricultural area, where the toll was 44 early today. Oth- er communities in the Blue Ridge Mountain foothills also suffered heavily. Officials ejrpect to discover additional .bodies in mountain- side homes buried by earth- slides during tbe flood. At least 25 homes were swept away and buried in mud in the tiny com- inanity of Davis Greet, north of (he Nelson County seat of Lov- ing! on. In the stale capital of Rich- mond, the flood-swollen James River began to cresting at 13.6 recede after feet above flood was ex- pected to be back in its banks fcy lite tonight. The flood crest moved into flat eastern. Virginia where its dangler sharply dissipated. Camillc also claimed 10 lives In two in West Vir- ginia and three in Cuba. Gamine, the worst hurricane tver to strike the American to weaken and dissipate over the cold North Atlantic waters by Sunday. Early today "it was 575 miles northeast of Bermuda, or Lati- tude 35.5 north and Longitude 54 west. Camille also triggered torren- tial rains and Hooding that forced more than IM.OOO from their homes in Oaxaca State on Mexico's Pacific coasL In Mississippi, Gav. John Bell Williams ordered boats sent out today to recover "numerous bodies" that an Army pilot said he spotted entangled In a float- ing island of debris. "If I hadn't seen it myself I wouldn't have believed said Capt. John D. Diggs. "It was a nightmare." i The captain said he counted 40 bodies in the snake-like mass of debris during a reconnais- sance flight. The Insurance Information In- stitute in Mobile, Ala., said its latest estimate showed that in- surance companies will have to pay between million and IJ25 million for property dam- age in Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama. Virginia" officials .'estimated damages at million, but they said the figure could rise sharp- ly because damage surveys are just beginning. Second Class Postage PiH At Nashua, N. H. 13 PAGES Prict TEN CENTS State Accidents Claim 8 Lives The curred No Thoroughfare main highway bridges and were rendered im- passable by rising floodwaters of the 'James River in'Richmond, Va. Offi- cials said the floods left 60 known dead and nearly {trice that many miss- ing and feared dead. The normally narrow river channel above has be- come an ever-widening lake'of rust- red as the river exceeded its record crest and continued to climb. Hardest hit were fiatland industries. (AP i By THE ASSOCLVTED PRESS Accidental deaths in New Hampshire, including two drownings rose to eight last night, according to police, worst mishap oc- in West Stevvarts- town where four persons were killed and one hospi- talized in a' highway crash on U.S. Route 3 Involving two cars and a truck. Identify Victims State police identified the dead as Yvon Cote, 35, of Nor. ton, VI., Peter Frizzell. Danny Brown, H, and his brother, Kel- ley Brown, all of Pittsbarg, N.H. Injured in the crash was Cote's wife, Yvonne, 31, who was listed in satisfactory condi- tion in West Stewartstown Hos- pital. She was a passenger in ler husband's car. Police said Cote pulled out to pass a truck operated by Leo Jaudelle, N. of North Slrat- 'ord. The Cote car struck a gas lank M the side of the truck and was thrown into the City Owed in. "Delinquent Taxes In Greenland, George Sawyer, 57, of Portland, Me., a Railway Express driver, was killed on Route K wteo his truck skidded By CLAUDETTE DUROCHER City Treasurer Tax Collector rving J. Gallant has posted 00 worth, in overdue 196S real es- ate and stock-in-trade taxes for Ux sale Sept. 18. Czechs Now Face Harsh New Laws PRAGUE (AP) -The Czech- oslovak government rammed throtlgh harsh new laws Friday night to curb antigovernment and anti-Soviet disorders. The army and police crushed-re- newed rioting in Brno, the na- tion's second largest city.' The new laws terms, fines or loss of jobs for virtually any activity directed igainst communism or those in power. Prague Radio the laws went into effect; Friday night and would continue until the end of the year. Two persons were 'reported killed and several injured in the second day of Brno, an industrial city of about ISO miles tast of Prague. Director Named At Institute Here Robert E. BloomSeM, 33, of Plainfield, N. J., has been named director of tbe N. H. Vocation- Technical Institute ,ixw under construction In Nashua. The school, situated of! Am- herst Street, Route' 101A, is ex- pectcd lo be completed by Sep- tember, 1970. BlootnfieM, a Marine Corps es- cort lo President D-right D, E- serihower; recently'served as an associate professor of technical drafting at Itarwfc, N. J., State CoOege. He was graduated fran Fitchburg, State Teachers College In and he received a degree In education from the University cf Connecticut' Sn IKS. I Officials earlier reported two persons killed in Bmo Thurs- day. Sources said seven Czechoslo- vak army tanks moved into the downtown area to help riot po- ke disperse some demon- strators. A dusk-lo-dawn curfew was mposed after the rioters were dispersed. The municipal committee of the Communist party in Prague said in its newspaper Friday persons, including roreigners, were arrested dur- rig demonstrations and riots in the capital Thursday. The new law-and-order meas- ires were adopted unanimously by the steering committee of the National Assembly at the de- mand of the Communist party. They were signed by President Ludvik Svoboda, Premier Old- rich Cemik. .and Assembly Chairman Alexander Dubcek. The full assembly is in recess. Prague Radio, which broai cast the "extraordinary meas tires" several times Friday night, said they-would be used not only against those who vio- late order or threaten peaceful working conditions also against those who incite such action or support It." PIZZA by Charles Famous thruput New England m w. 'PEARL ST. Finest in Pizzas Grinders (an; varieties) Regular 90c PLAIN PIZZA TUESDAY ONLY Dpen l.'l A.M. A.M. Men. thru Saf.' Sundays 3 P.M. fo Tiraei Stnici The United states and Thailand have agreed lo begin talks on reducing the man American force in Thailand, the State Department ;aid last nijht. There was no'immediate in-, dication of how soon the talks would begin, but 'American of- ficials foresaw no rapid with- drawal. The -American forces in Thailand are primarily in- volved in air operations against Jomrrmnist-led troops in South Vietnam and Laos. Robert J. McCJoslrey, the State Department spokesman, said President Niton had agreed Milford Company Is Low Bidder Greenville Construction, Ire., MiHord, has submitted a lew bid nl H2.HS for a contract to alter the interior of the slate liquor store here by making the sales area larger. Several other firrfa submitted bids for the project off the South Daniel Webster Highway, accord- ing to the N. H. Department of Public Worts and Highways. The work is scheduled to be completed by next April i, The list of delinquent tax- payers, together with taxes due, is postal in the Registry of Deeds office at the courthouse on Tem- ple Street and on the basement bulletin board at City Hall U.S. May Reduce iii Thailand visit to B a n g k o k last month that "at the appropriate time there should be consultations leading to a gradual reduction of the level of our forces in Thailand." He disclosed that Thanat Kho- man, .the Thai foreign minister, took the initiative this week in suggesting that the talks begin, and "we for oar part are willing to enter into such discussions." Well-placed diplomatic sources said Thai gov- ernment had evidently decided to press for early talks. Administration sources refused to say wfiich side had brought up the subject of troop rcduc- with Thai leaders during Millions during Nixon's rait If the taxes are not paid by that day, interested parties may assume the tax bill at a sale in the tax collector's office, thereby acquiring a lien on the real estate.- Forfeit- Property Should the overdue taxes, plus interest apd posting costs, go un- paid for 'two years and a' diy after the tax' bill erty owner will forfeit Us prop- erty to the person who has as sumcd his taxes. The cily can, in case there are no interested parties, be a "buy- er" at a tax sale and two years and a day later take title to property of delinquent 'taxpayers and auction it off. Gallant said he has received re- quests from a number of tax. payers to have their names feft off the list because of pending tax payments. But he said thty have been turned down because by law, de- linquent taxpayers cannot be ex- cused from 'being posted, except through an abatement authorized by the assessors. And from an ethical standpoint, he added, "If you excused one, you would have to excuse them ill." across the median lane, jack-knifed and overturned. He was alone in the vehicle. Alphonse St Laurent. 74, of Manchester was killed last night as he worked on his rear-engine car with the motor running. Police said that apparently tne vehicle slipped into reverse gear and ran over St. Laurent and dragged him 80 feet. Two drownings were listed by police: Henry K. Maxfield. 17, of Barnstead drowned in Lake Winnipesaubre when the U he was in with three companions sack near Alton Bay. Officials said the youth drowned when he and his companions were swimming to shore after the craft sank. ol hers tried in vain to rescue Maxfidd. officials said. Officials of the Fish and Game Departmenet recovered tht youth's body about two hours after the mishap. Carl Rothwell. of Pena-cook, drowned in Walker Pond, Boscawen. while fishing with a companion. C-D Asked to Help Locate Woman, 24 A West Windham couple, Mr. he family has been able to and Mrs. Earl MacEachen, are piece together, Mrs. MacEach-bankigg on hope, prayer and en said, the couple decided coming lane and sedan driven Brown. collided with by' Danny Weekend Edition Stock Lists Jeen-Age Page Extra Comics a ham radio operator to bring hem news about their nephew's missing wife in hurricane-rav- aged Pass Christian, Miss. The coastal community was devastated by towering tides 'arly this week as Hurricane Camille raked Mississippi. Mrs. MacEachen said contact was made Wednesday with her nephew Richard Keller, 26, a leneral Electric missiles sys- em worker formerly of Lynn. Mass. He was located in a hospital, suffering from shock and expo- iUre. Still Missing But his wife, the former Lu- ane Metivier, 24, of Keene, is itill unaccounted for. The Kel- ers are to mark their first wedding anniversary Aug. 31. The young couple resided in the devastated Richelieu apart- Bent building from which, at last report, 23 bodies were re- moved. From the bits of Information ride out the storm in the mod- em, brick building. They were advised to move their belong- ngs to a higher floor and to congregate with other apart- ment dwellers for safety. "That's probably where re- ports of there being a hurricane party she said. Keller, she added, can re- member fleeing with his wife .0 the roof of the building when flood waters reached the third story- They became separated and he vaguely remembers swimming about. Telephone communication! with Pass Christian. Mrs. Mac- Eachen said, are virtually non- existent She said the Nashua Civil De- fense office was called upon to assist in locating her nephew. But most of the Civil Defense systems, she said, are jammed with government emergency calls and a ham operator it assisting the family now in get- ting more information from Pass Christian. U.S. Troops Capture Hill Held By Enemy By HORST FAAS LANDING ZONE CENTER, Vietnam U.S. troops day captured a rpcty knoll south of Da Nang from enemy forces who for four days had blocked all efforts to reach a downed American helicopter. Four companies of the U.S. America! Division, totaling about 250 men, occupied the hill at dusk against little resistance. From their vantage point, they were in position to advance to the site of the crash about yards away, presumably Sun- day. The four companies began moving up the north slope of the knoll, known as Hill 101, earlier in the day. They had sought to drive up the west slope of (he hill, 31: miles southwest of Da Nang, but pulled back after run- ning into strong enemy fire. Marine units were In blocking positionj hoping (o cut off ene- my troops which might try lo pull off the hill and escape. The assault began with waves of Air Force bombers pounding an estimated 100 steel-rein- forced bunkers. Artillery also hammered the enemy positions. Defines Objective Military spokesmen said the object of the assault is (o seize the hill from which North Viet- namese Iropps have been block' Ing American efforts since Wednesday to push ahead to I he Urban Renewal Properties Acquired The Nashua Housing Authority Urban Renewal Agency yesterday acquired ils first properties within the proposed Myrtle Street project. The properties and former owners include: 166-170 West Pearl St., Pappademas Real Estate Corp., 144 West Pearl St, Mr. and Mrs. William Hamel, and 29 Cen- tral St., Mr. and Mrs, William Clay. Seated, 1 to r, are Mrs. Clay, George J, Pappademas, and Noel Plante, NHA chairman; standing William Cay, Mrs. Pappademas, and Atty. Normand R. Pelletier- (Telegraphoto-Anduskevich) Coming soon to Nashua Trust MASTER CHARGE The Interbank Card Member F. D. I. C FOREST RIDGE Amhtrsf Route I01A -.Naihua, N. H. Now renling I, 2 3 Bedroom with air conditioning and carpeting from monthly on 833-7752 Located tm'ii deep trees on IOIA at Exit 7W We Carry A FULL LINE of CABOTS Stains Paints Nashua Wallpaper Co. W. Peail St. 882-M9i Men. >Sru'Sat. to Open Thnrj. Til 9 crash site, about south of the hill. yardi Ncrth Vietnamese Iroops have put big antiaircraft guns and other weapons on Ihe hill and in- flicted serious American losses and damage. those reported missing abroad the downed helicopter the U.S.. forces are (rying lo reach are a battalion command- er, six other Army men and As- sociated Press photographer Oliver Noonan. U.S. headquarters reported (hat Iroops of the IKlh Brigade clashed twice Friday with North Vietnamese soldiers near the crash site. At least n enemy and one American soldier were reported killed and K Ameri- cans wounded. Later, enemy gunners pumped IS mortar rounds bio wo night caops of the 158th Brigade infantrymen. Head- quarters said American casual- ties were light. Military spolwmen claim more than 500 North. Viet- namese soldiers have been kilted since Sunday in the fight- ing west of Tarn Ky. There Is no firm count on American casualties, but field reports put them at 33 to 40 killed, more than 160 wounded and 10 missing, including seven Array men aboard lha helicopter downed by North Vietnamese antiaircraft Tuesday. About 70 miles south of Ihjj action, North Vietnamese (roopj ambushed U.S. Army engineers clearing National Highway 1 cf mines. One American was killed and nine wounded. Enemy loss- es were not immediately known, headquarters said. Two sharp fights flared 1J miles apart along the demilita- rized zone 200 miles north of Da Nang. U.S. Marines lost six killed and 13 irounded in a 3H-hour battle four miles northwest o! Ifie Rocfrpifc. Eight North Viet- namese were reported killed. Fifteen miles easl, Iroops ol the U.S. 5th Mechanized Infan- try Division suffered one man killed and seven wounded when North Vietnamese soldiers at- tacked their night bivouac. Ene- my losses were not known. U.S. headquarters said theft were n enemy rocket and mor- tar attacks throughout South Vietnam fn the 21-hour period ending this morning. i "Fourteen of these attaclj were against U.S. units or in- a communique said. "Thirteen of the 25 resulted in casualties or dam- age. U.S. casualties were one killed and 26 wounded." '69 Daily Rentals as low as r day Call Teri 888-1121 MacMulkin Chevrolet TOMGHT-IN" THE TELEGRAPH Abb? Blosut Church Classifieds It. 1! 15. 17, Comics 10. 11 Crossword J Editorial Financial 6 Horoscope 3 Lawrence 4 Obituaries' Pearson Social Sports Teen Television Dr. Thosteson II Weather !J Women's x j Pace Jl   

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