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Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: August 11, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - August 11, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle It is not true that the ap- pendix is useless. It has put thousands of surgeons' wives in fur coat'. Nashua Celeoraph New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspaper J J. Weather Cool Tonight Sunny Tuesday Full Report on Page Two YOL 101 NO. 138 the New HimpsMrt Telegraph Established October 20.188 NASHUA. NEW HAMPSHIRE, MONDAY. AUGUST 11. Second Ctisj Postage AtKubua.N.R 22 PASES Fiitt TEN CENTS Where Six Were Gunnecf Down Detroit Police Commissioner Jo- harines F. Spreen points to the name 'of one of Jive policemen who were in- jured by gunfire yesterday morning, along with a civilian, in the northwest section of Detroit. A former mental patient barricaded himself in his home and unleased a hail of fire from a shotgun. Lynn W. Blackwell sur- rendered unharmed after a half-hour exchange of gunfire. {AP Wirephoto) Officials Say Blow On Head May Have Killed Debbie Horn Body Is Found in Sandown SANDOWN, N- H. (AP) Debra Lee Horn, the 11 year old girl decomposed body was. found Sunday in the trunk of an abandoned auto here may have died from a blow to the head. "There was an indication of some trauma to the back of the Asst Atty Gen. Norman D'Amours said today. "Although the doctor could not state posi- tively that this mark-... was a trauma, it appeared very probably that such was the case." Statement Issued A statement issued at mid- morning by the attorney gener- al's office in Concord reiterated what D'Amours said. "Here was what appeared to be a traumatic injury to the back of the the state- ment said. It added: "No cause of death was Police Push Manhunt In California Deaths 1HV LINDA between this in blood on the front door. -ANGELES the others. They're LaBianca residence is pushed a removed. I just don't five miles from Bel Air. for a suspect in the bizarre: killings of connection." The man and woman were slabbed many times in police said they were seeking a man whose name 'came up in conversation" with Tate arid home, Houchin caretaker arrested five miles man's head wrapped in a guest cottage behind Miss -i a couple was the woman's in a J2M.OOO home when the rater in a .In the slayings at were found. home Saturday, one tousle-haired William Qted head was covered with a jA1i i was booked on suspi- i William Etson Garret-on, 19, is booked on is a similarity, but whether it's the same suspect or a copycat we just' don't The latest victims" were id en tiled, as. Leno A. LaBianca, of murder, but Detective Lt. Robert Helder said physical evidence to link him lo the icioh of murder in Police Sgt. Bryce owner of a small had not been found. layings of five persons in-Juding Actress Sharon fate, in' Los Angeles.-. the scene' of; the" second slayings, Inspector K.' J.' Me-Cauley '1 don't see" supermarket chain, and 'his wife Rosemary, '38. "Police' said their, bodies, were discovered in nightclothes 'Sunday mghl _ nelson was given a lie de-lector test Sunday. Sgt. Jesse Buckles, said homicide detectives were "not entirely satis LaBianca's. spn b'y a witti his Frank-; -Houchia said the two autopsy, showed that ilisj Tate, n, boney-bloride wife o film director Roman Polanski numerous- times of multiple slab wounds o Highest throats were slit." McCauley said the word "death" was written in an undisclosed substance on the back and chest. She wa acity at the 1919 150th A new office of as probate judge for IV legislature itill occu ary signaled the opening of to launch its original chambers, ay's festivities attended by efforts to find up for council istimaled crowd of of bringing services to DQQTe tJuTI 66 Led by Cheryl Bailey Dion, mi-orette of the Nashua VFW Drum ind Bugle Corp, the parade of and to find new methods cf increasing their business and employment LUtNc UMII wi JIcHlS ut state interest. Safely Commissioner Robert Rhodes has submitted for Road Toll mils, comprising 12 divisions of jiElary raits, drum and bogle patriotic, fraternal and indi-Idual antique cars, mount-4 riders and marching 4-H, boy ,cout and cub scout groups Reorganizing and strengthening the present OEO Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. "It will seek to establish more precise standards, for measuring performance (of a HO.OOO-a-ycar" budget for alcohol and drug abuse control by stale police. The funds for the current Kennium ivcrc appropriated by the 1569 102 Mark By THE ASSOCIATED PRES Two persons lost their lives IT separate accidents during th weekend in New Hampshire >ven an oi-Ieam thrilled the rowd which lined the mile and i half parade route. Receiving special applause were Hre. Florence Bamaby, 82, Brook-Jne'j No. 1 bicyclist on her decorated wheel and Corey In a fire red 1909 larweH roadster rivaling the 'flclc than OEO used In the and will provide regular independent appraisals off federal social programs. of the Office of Health Services to try to improve methods of delivering health services lo the poor. Strengthening the Office Leonard IliC has asked the council for 'an additional above and beyond the JI5.230 already received lo start the first phase of an investigation of hew much money the stale Tax Commission has reportedly failed to collect from the the state's highway fa talily loll for Ihe year lo 102 Mrs. Lucien Morrissetle, 45 of Manchester, was killed whcr the car in which she was rM ing went through a guardrai and plunged 200 feet down ar embankment In z rainstorm of Interstate t) in Concord Sun Among those in attendance were joremor Waller Peterson, who lelfrered the main Coun-rilor Bernard Streeler of Nashua ind Representative Webster E. Iridges of Services, giving it "central responsibility for programs which help provide advocates for the poor la their dealing with social institutions." i-Setting up a new office and dividends tax. The governor is asking council permission for a salary boost for one of his citizens (ask force staffers. Larry Roth, originally hired as director of public Mrs. Morrissetle was a widov with eight children. Four o them were injured in Ihe crash One of them, Robert, 7, wa reported in serious condition it operations lo Concord hospital. PIZZA by quality of field operations at slafe and local levels. annually. Peterson said Roth's promotion to Plante, M, was falall] injured in a crash on Route 10 Famous thruout Kew training and technical ,of operations should Barnstead Sunday. H7 W. PEASL funds will be with a said he was a passcn Ihose who run slightly different in a car operated by Pete Finest in Pizzas programs and he plans before the council 17, of Piltsfield. The! allocations for legislative committee the car wen! off the roac (3u opportunity of the 150th hit a utility pole. mined, however, since the body, was in such an advanced slate of decomposition." Debra, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Horn of Al- enstown, had been missing since Jan. 29 and had been the object of repealed mass search- s. She had been allowed to stay jome from school the day she disappeared because, her par- ents, said, she had fallen on a na'ch of fee and complained of a ramp on the head. Whether this injury and the apparent injury D'Araours spoke of were the same could not be determined immediately. The body was found Sunday afternoon by three youths from Everett, Mass.. who had stopped to investigate the car and idly lifted the auto's trunk lid. Identification was made through dental charts and some jewelry found on the gold ring with a dark oval stone and a silver earring. D'Aaouis said the Jewelry was identified by Debbie's par- ents, who were staying at their summer horae" In London. The body clothed, and they frund no trace of clothing either in the car or in the immediate area. The auto, a' mi Plymouth, was abandoned about four yean ago, police said. Its wheels had been removed. H was situated about feet from the home of the owner, identified DEBRA HORN figt 2 was found un- aulhorities sai y Earl would be on a three-year average, less allow- ance for city-owned equipment and without providing a formance bond. The Northeast firm was re- ported as seeking under the same conditions, except that the .city'will, be permitted to keep' Us refuse "collection vehi 1 Sullivan said an attempt will be made to clear away the'con- fusion and ;all conditions per- taining to the negotiated price will be set down in writing. This, he.said, will delay aldermanic consideration of the contract proposal for a final decision. In their lelter the union offi- cials state that "the mayor and the commissioners claim they have'spent a lot ol time inves- tigating-the pros 'and cons of the rubbish problem and they say it should come to a head. "We, the union, also> think it should ccme lo a head. "The Jenkins and Houle continued, "also feels that theje facts should be brought out and printed for the benefit of the taxpayers: Points Ocllfned "1. The city is hiring a pri- vate concern al a cost of per hour, wilh two public works employes on the packers, and JJ5 per hour with the paid to the privale concera own men on the packers. This past on a 40-hour union also asks how many "I. These hired will be included in lave no time cards. Who year contract proposed the hours put in. by these if there will be an added "J.. The mayor claims if new homes and streeli 3PW rubbish crews are hiding are added n back of buildings and inquiry is directed at :ng too much time in the will operate the sanitary taurants, and constantly not operation and what ing their work. Why rubbish collection costs these' -men been be. If, the; .costi under the union contract? considered. r 1 niioa: the- DPW discussion with the "alder- crews have been doing an' Sullivan has pointed but cellent job, with the the city plans lo they have to do the work landfill operation. You know and we know, that union asks for a compa- one can collect rubbish of the tola! costs' associ- cheap as the city is doing with the contract and thosa If the city would have the DPW. if it were' to con- new packers, instead of hiring a'tinue rubbish collections privale concern at such a highl adequate equipment. The price, we could have doubled concludes its letter by our packers for the price a vole against the Moon Men By HOWARD quarantine quarters. Only SPACE CENTER, before, doclors had said (AP) Freed from three could find no evidence of isolation, the Apollo 11 astronauts .relaxed with their germs or infection from the astronauts' lunar contact. lies today before plunging into a hectic round of celebrations waiting world wis ready to heap the pioneers with honors in their historic weeks ahead. Neil A. Armstrong, Edwin whirlwind schedule starts Aldrin Jr. and Michael when Armslrong, Ald- sped straight to their and Collins hold a newi Sunday night when here to report 01 Asian and Pacific Leaders Hail New Approach by U.S. By ROBERT TRUMBULL NIK York THHl Nlwi tinlei PAGO PAGO, Samoa Sec- retary' of State William P. Rogers has returned lo Ameri- can soil in this exolic Iropical outpost after having conveyed, apparently with success, a new policy and style of United States diplomacy in Asia and the Pa- cific. The policy enunciated by Rogers included a vigorous ap- proach lo more conciliatory re- lation) with Communist China, which he hopes will set the tone for accommodation when condi- tions become more propitious in the future. The change of style was in the low key stance problemi under discussion with leaders in the countries visited. The tour now ending took Rogers to Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Aus- tralia and New Zealand. Last, May he visited Thailand, India, Pakistan and Iran. Diplomats and others have; "At the same time we mail reported that the muted ap- on the line. The other parly eels that he is being treated as an equal." The change in emphasis could lead to "very important he declared. Efforts Cited For example the overtures (o and could help us with voles in' the United he ex- plained. In a speech H Canberra, WILUAM P. ROGERS proach evoked a warm r e sponse among Asian and Pacific leaden. "We have adopted basic poli- cies that we think are said in an interview jhere. BUS TP US! Hourly From Downtown To Air-Conditioned NASHUA MALL be firm In presenting our posl< tlon, pulling Ihe case In a friendly but direct he said. "When policies differ, you gain more respect by laying it '69 Chevrofets Daily Rentals as low as r day Coll Teri 888-1121 MacMulkin Chevrolet their daring mission. That afternoon, a downtown Houston luncheon will be attend- ed by nearly 700 space workers. On Wednesday, the asfronautj and their families fly lo Nevf York for a ticker taje and an appearance al the Unit- ed Nations, followed in the aft- ernoon by another parade in Chicago. The day winds up in Los Angeles at a gala stale din- ner wilh President Nixon aj host. On Saturday, they will be hon- ored by a Houston parade fol- lowed by a Tejas-sUcd parly in There also is talk of a lour. The moonmcn got of lii worM "soon tpen the tween Communist QaMie American ambassadors in War- day m Sua< njl.EUVdll III nar-l II) ,v .1. saw. suspended by the 'm I f side last February. The .V '1 sations could be resumed any "mulually place, he said. OI.C, IJC 3C11U. Rogers also said thauhe on Administration 
                            

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