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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - July 31, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle A church bulletin listed the sermon topic: "Gossip." Im- mediately following was the hymn: "I Love to Tell the Story." VOL 101 NO. 123 Nashua Celeqraph New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspaper C J Weather Fair Tonight Worm On Friday Full Report on Page Two CoofinuJai the New Hunpshirt Telegraph EstibSsbed October X, IBM NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE. THURSDAY, JULY 31. 194? Secood Qiis Postage PiM At Nuhua, N. V, 22 PAGES TEN CENTS Pounding Pier Pilings Work on the supports for the new .bridge across Uie Merrimack River is progressing at a rapid pace as the last weeks have seen'workmen begin long and noisy task of driving pilings into the river bottom. Men and equipment of the Cianchette Brothers Construction Co., of Pitts- field, have also extended a gravel roadway to the middle of the river. (Telegraphoto-Harrigan) India Hails President Nixon ihool haads with cheering per-j sons nearby, then returned to' he car and drove on as (he1 demonstrators surged toward Mm. Nixon to the Indian capl- il after a three-day visit ia rhailand and a South Vietnam. side trip to India Is ihe NEW DELHI (AP) President Nixon arrived in India today for a friendly and tumultuous welcome in 96-degree weather, and then sat down along with Prime Minister Indira Gandhi to discuss the prob- lems of the world's largest non-Communist nation. Good Start Nixon got oil to a good start with his Indian' hosts by telling thein at the airport that the United States wants to work with them ''for the goals you be- lieve are best for India, not car goals, but goals in which we all believe." The American President also recalled that in 1953 Prime Min- ister Jawaharlal Nehru, Mrs. Gandhi's father, told him thai India wanted "a generation ol uninterrupted peace." "Our major goal now Is (o succeed in that dream Mr. Neh- _ ______......B1_. ru had generation of en farther the friendly tiei be- peace for India, Asia and the Nixon said. "We want onr generation to be remembered as the genera- lion that set foot on the moon and as the one in which we hat! uninterrupted peace and Justice for man on the earth." Thousands of friendly Indians cheered the President along his route into the city, but at one point about 400 young demon- strators waved black flags at him and shouted slogans against fourth stop on a global tour that fnds Sunday a tier more slops in Pakistan, Ro.mania. and Britain. The temperature was 95 de- grees when Nixon and his -wife stepped from their plane and a 11-gua salute boomed. A crowd ol about applauded as Ka- on was garlanded and Mn. Nix- on was presented a bouquet ol flowers.. Nixon expressed regret 'that his third visit to New Delhi was so short, a sentiment in which Ms host. Acting President Mo- bammad Hidayatullah, con- curred. Bat the Indian president said: "ffe are confident that the "change of views wai strength- the Vietnam war. Ignoring the hecklers, Nixon got out of his limousine and Battle Continues As Deadline Approaches (AP) 1 .Senate Democratic leaders, banking' .von some party hoped'. to' push through-a six-month ex- i tension-of the 10 percent surtax today only hours be- fore it is due to die. '.GOP'Plans Republicans, however, planned aa llth hour attempt to squeeze through the full II- rionth surtax intension sought by President Nixon. Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield, while standing pat on his; contention i there should be only a temporary surtax exten- sion mitil work is completed on .major, tax reforms, relented somewhat Wednesday night and agreed to a surtax debate. Mansfield said he dent the six-month bia, would pass, his branch, but the, Mon- tana there were other pitfalls to concluding action on the, measure.' before, midnight' Sen. John J. Williams; of Dela- ware, senior Republican mem- ber'of the Finance Committee, had made it clear he would try to upset the Democratic plan by offering two amendments. One' would provide the full year's extension as in the Houa bill and the other would repeal the 7 per cent investment tax credit. Mansfield, said were pledged to ipuse, which. has: approved a rear's .extension, would go. along rith the Senate onI a six-month iill, re- Democratic proposals for anything' less, thin a' fan year's extension! working "under the tightest possible schedule with the pay check surtax with- holding rates due to expirt'tt midnight Most members of agreed that If the sor- lax withholding rates were al- lowed to die tonight, it wonld be next to impossible to revive the surtax'itself. The impasse over the surtax Democrats repeal but would try to defeat the amend- ment at this time.. "Here, was no guarantee the Reformers Weigh Tax Relief Plans WASHINGTON (AP) House tax reformers, working ta give average taxpayers a better break, are considering either in- creasing the 10 per cent stand- ard deduction or upping the personal exemption. decisions on tax relief will complete Ihe broad reform bill scheduled for voting in the House next week. 'Although more than half the House .membership has .ex- pressed interest in raising the exemption, sentiment in the Ways and Means Committee ap- parently favors revising, the 1 1 a n d a r d which would cost the Treasury much less menae. exemption Increase, It was would reduce tax yfeH nearly bfflion. Rais- ing the standard deduction from 10 to 1( per cent and the ceUing on it from to J1.8M was estimated to cost Jl.J billion. Meanwhile, the' committee tias softened somewhat its pro- posed crackdown on Ihe use.ol farm Josses lo reduce investors' Honiara taxable income and on the use of certain oil industry prefettBcei by well-to-do Indi- Decisions to slash the .oil de- pletion allowance, and related benefits, however, were reaf- firmed. In its final review, the com. mitlee decided that only large operators In the farm field should be subjected to a new rule by which the Treasury would recapture special farm loss deductions when the farm property is sold. The rule, it specified, .will apply only lo per> sons with or more non- farm income and farm tosses ol at'least The committee reaffirmed Its plan minimum income'tax applying lo Individuals who have, more, than half their in- come, protected by. special de- ductions' or shelters. Bet it sak that in computing Income for this purpose, deduction of Intan- gible .drilling costs and the tx- cess of depletion over coil would not be considered special preferences.' The committee dropped a pre- viously adopted plan to Impose a tax of 10 per cent on some state and municipal bond Inter- est collected by banks and other financial THE FOLLOWING STORES Wilt BE OPEN THURSDAY FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M. BERGERON'S CARTER'S MEN'S SHOP ENTERPRISE DEFT. STORE ISIDORE'S HAIR.STYLING JORDAN'S LUGGAGE SHOP LYMPH'S MEN'S BOYS' STORE JIILLER'S SEARS ROEBUCK 20th CENTURY High St Mkt' "V ft artenskn continued through most of Wednesday'.with Demo- crats standing by earlier demand for five-month exten- sion and Republicans remaining firm in their opposition. After a long series of confer- ences involving Republican Leader Everett M. Dirksen and many others, Mansfield appar- ehtly.obtained the understand- ing he wanted. The Democratic leader moved to put aside the Safeguard mis- sile defense debate temporarily so the Senate could call up a bill which would be used for the sur- charge extension. tween our two countries." Prime Minister Indira Gandhi also welcomed Nixon, but as the head of 'government not the head of state she did not speak. She and Nixon scheduled two conferences later. The President in his talks with Indian leaders planned lo push a pet project, the develop- ment of Asian regional coopera- tion. A White House source said India appears to have a greater interest in such cooperation, particularly ia the economic sphere, than any of the other nations Nixon is visiting. The President is hopeful (hat region- al arrangements will ultimately relieve the United States of much of its responsibility for the defense of non-Communist Asia against threat. any Communist et off aa trms race between the two impoverished nations. Nixon vill hear the Pakistan side when he gets to Lahore Fri- day. Greets CUIdm As Niton headed for his car after the airport arrival 'cere- mony, children who waited to shake his hand yelled to him. the President broke away from lis security guard and walked ibout 10 yards to shake their lands and pat their cheeks. Nixon left the "airport in his limousine with the sliding glass roof open so that he could stand and wave to thousands lining the route Into the city. Hidayatullah >ras car with Nixon. Mrs.' link dress with a black'border, 'allowed ia another car with Mrs. Gandhi Nixon got out of his limousine iriefly a few miles from the air- port to greet about .school children from the Con- vent for girls and the St. Mary's School; for'boys.- They were Peering wildly and waving American and Indian flags. As the .boys and girls'surged iroond Nixon, Mother Superior Frances Claire O'Donnell of Ireland, greeted him oa behalf of the.students. The mother superior "had been ad- vised beforehand that Nixon irobably would stop le passed the convent Nixon had only'one other pub- ic appearance'scheduled during lis hours in India, a visit to Ihe site on the backs of the Jumna River where Mohandas Gandhi was cremated. He planned to lay a wreath and >lant a tree. Gandhi was'the bander of Indian Independence. Nixon and Mrs. Gandhi also were certain to discuss "the threat of' Communist China, which India has watched warily since their 1KJ'border war; the Soviet proposal for an Asian co- alition against which In- dia hasn't, shown much interest in, arm's 'policies to- ward and Pakistani The Uniled States has 'not been selling military' goods lo either India or Pakistan-since nations went lo war fa 1965. Pakistan is pleading for a resumption of sales because its army Is American weapons. India was less alfected by the cutoff in U.S. arms sales be- cause its army had been sup- plied mainly by the Soviets. The Indians' fear a resumption Area Residents Nasknans were finally able to put lielr nmbrdUs today, tiler nearly Wweeki of conls- .cloud? ui more, tke imshlne and warm (empentjrerare (ting io'Hnger Wkile the fcmnldlly laia de- creased considerably c today, Ugh tanpentmrei 'are expected to be near lie SS-degree mart Tempenfores tonight win be ta (be'Mi, with gentle sonUwesferiy rinds. N'o toporUot changes are predicted- thronghopt. the week- end, and there Is' only a per cent ckuce of rain. Kennedy Rules Out Presidential Bid By WAITER R. HEARS WASHINGTON (AP) Sea Edward M.' Kennedy returned to his Senate duties today and con- firmed he will not seek the pres- idency in 197J. The Massachusetts Democrat, walking through throngs of tour- ists up the main steps to the Senate 'chamber, was asked whether his decision not to rua was irrevocable. "That's Kennedy re- plied. '1 Intend to fill cot ray Senate'tenn if I am re-elected. Asked if he would run under any other circumstances Kenne- dy replied shortly, "No." The senator said he was re- He held no news conference brother, John, won in 18SO and but tatted to newsmen who trot-which his brother, Robert ted behind him through the sought In 1JS8. Both were assas- crowds of curious, camera snap- sinated. ping tourists. Capitol police blocked news- men, from entering the Capitol menl: itself and Kennedy went directly on to the Senate floor. Tte Announcement Edward Kennedy's. announce- Edward M. Kennedy Is ___________....... returning to Washington lo re- Crowds of newsmen and tour- United States ists were so thick that when and'.assistant majority Kennedy arrived, sitting In the passenger seat of a car driven He u sraleful lo the people by an aide, he had difficulty Massacbusetti for their opening the door. Kennedy, Jn a statement re- leased Wednesday at his Boston of flee, said he will remain In the Senate, will" seekx.re-election expressions of confidence and expects to submit his record (o them as a candidate for re-elec- tion in 1979. "If re-elected, he'will serve out his entire term." Not all Democrats were cer- tain the'disclaimer of 1971presi- dential Intentions wonld stick. "I'm certain' Sen; Kennedy was said Sen.- Daniel SEN. KENNEDY Commcrno'er-m-Ciiief in War Zone President Nixon views armored personnel carrier of the U. S. First Infantry Division during his visit Wednesday to the division's headquarters at Di An, 12 miles north of Saigon. At left is Maj. Gen. Onvin Talbott of San Jose, Calif., the division's commanding (AP Wirephoto via radio from Saigon) Air Sampler Due Here Next Week City .Solicitor Arthur 0. Gormley. was assured today by the N. Hi'Alr Pollution Control Commission that the 1 o n g awaited sampler to be installed in the Northwest 'section of Ihe city would arrive sometime neit week.; City officials are hopeful that Fife t again. George Gilbert Hearing Today LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP) George Gilbert, accused of kill- ing his wife.off the Massachu- setts coast, was to appear in court today in an attempt to be released on bond. Gilbert, 48, Hudson, N.H., ap- peared Wednesday In Justice Court for arraignment on a fugi- tive charge. He is accused in Boston of murder ol his wile, Mary, M, 3J4 years ago. Gilbert was freed in Las Ve- gas July li when a judge ruled Gilbert's warrant was signed improperly in Essex County, Mass. He turned himself in July 11 after another warrant was filed, but he will have to go through extradition procedures the sampler will determine the real cause of, the odor in that area, which das been the'center of controversy for some time. The complain ts in the cily's northwest section of offensive odors, date back over (he last lew years. And last August a resolution was introduced at tha meeting of the Board of Alder- men asking that the planning committee be granted power to study the cause of (he odors. Gormley explained that be- fore any action can'be taken, cause of the odor must be pin- pointed. The state Air Pollution Con- trol Commission was contacted and finally the commission said it would bring its sampler 19 Nashua in May this year. When the laboratory didn't ar- rive in May, Gormley pursued the issue and today, he was as- sured by Commission director Forrest Bumford that the sam- pler would be available next week. It was explained that the measuring devices are housed in a house trailer type of vehi- cle, complete with laboratory. It is expected the laboratory will be stationed at a Berkshire Road location. Nixon Visit Boosts Thieu Image Planning Board Agenda Is Listed arning to tare part in the year and, If he wins, TERENCE ILUML were also anxious to Hems be late over the surtax and the de-iloyment of the 'proposed anti-ballistic a full six-year term. That would rule out any 1W1 bid for the presidency which York Twin NIWI SAIGO.V Brief as it was President Nixon's reporters that it was the first time that an American president had visited Ihe a meeting ol the City Planning Board Wednesday night at City Planner Fred D. Plans Initiated to visit lo South .Vietnam today was i 'political windfall for President Nguyen paid a formal call on his South Vietnamese them is lollops: Preliminary subdivision plot on Lynn Street, submitted by Textile Field as according to the. South Vietnamese leader's President Johnson came, to Vietnam twice, in diver, Site plan for service station on Amherst Plans are under way to rename the Textile Field fa honor of S'ashuans who were killed in Vietnam War'. action.; A spokesman said jt is proposed o name the park as the Memorial Field. Initial plans call for the construction of a monument and Erection of a flagpole. It fs expected a which has been flown In the combat zone' will be Installed. Further plans wfll discussed it a meeting of representatives of fcshui veteranj organizations, Gold Star Mothers, with the Park-Recreation Commission, tomorrow night In the American Legion hall. The spokesman said that representatives of the towns of Hudson and Merrimack have been Invited lo participate In the renaming of the recreational areai He said several of the war dead had been born in Nashua, but had been Bring la these communities at the time they wen killed In combat. The proposed monument visit was regarded as a visible demonstration to the South Vietnamese people ol Nixon's continued support of Thieu, a support many had begun lo suspect was wavering. For the South Vietnamese president, ler things could hive been as beneficial In domestic political terms is the ceremony In which Nixon and Thieu itood side by tide on the red carpeted steps of the presidential palace. "It was i very good VAN 1968, but confined both vis-Its to secure military installations. Opportune Time Nixon's display of support for Thieu came at a particularly opportune time for Ihe .South Vietnamese president. T h I c u has been severely criticized during the last two weeks by Politicians and legislators be-cause ol his July 11 speech In which he Invited the Vietcong to participate In guaranteed and supervised elections as a wilh Improved Machinery Inc., officials on sale ol city land off Waveriy Street, and rcroning ol tract from A residential (o light industrial district; Board approval of communications to Board of Aldermen and one tj firunce ccmmitfce; Handling new s'atc law rcquir-ing notification of abutting owners to new subdivisions. A meeting with the aWermanle planning committee wiH PIZZA by instated at lie comer of Ledge and .Seventh Streets, of Thieu'i aides said today with unabashed satisfaction than D.OOO miles In order lo have five hour ol con resolving Ihe war. Ten days ago the Senile THE Famous thnwul New of the Nixon had left the with Nixon. Today (he a resolution H7.W. PEARL Textile Field ij under much better thin diked for the Presidcnl had 14 U of the P-R ai long, and this time, his powers In 18 lo in 1, 11 Fines! ii Pizzas For many years, it was The aide was referring ta tides, were quick oiler, which some u Sultbcrccr 13 of the Nashua Island sum mil out, Nixon had come believe the li -rs i on June t when Thlea t Financial li Regular Thosleson 1( Weather i PLAIN soon to Nashua TOO HOT! TOO WET! To Shop Accounts INVITED WE Scene 4 Obituaries 1J TUESDAY-' 7Cr. ONLY Rentals as low II A.M. fo 2 A.M. Interbank Card Member NASHUA -AAAI 1 Wallpaper Co. 129 W. Pearl St. (t Z.O Coll day 8RR-1171 Sundays 3 P.M. fo 1 _ _ Thurs. Night till   

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