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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - July 26, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle Many a thinks she bought a new dress lor a ri- diculous price when in reali- ty, she bought it for an absurd figure. Nashua New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspaper Weather tonight, Possible Rain Sundoy, Little Chonge Full Report on Page Two YOL 101 NO. -1Z4 Continuing the New Hampshire Telegraph Established October W. 1S31 NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, SATURDAY. JULY 26, 1969 Second CUss Postage At Nashua, N.H. UPASES Pric. .TEN CENTS Deconf Process Begins Technicians at the lunar receiving laboratory 4t the Manned Spacecraft .Center, Houston, Tex., place the box containing moon samples in the de- contamination vault soon after they arrived. The box, which weighs 33.35 pounds, contains rocks, two core sam- ples and the solar wind 'experiment. (AP Wirephoto) Ted Puts Future On Line; National Reaction Divided By JAMES POLK HYANNIS PORT, Mass. (AP) Sen. Edward M- Kennedy has put his fabled political future on the line before a divided public af- ter a pretty secretary's death that left haunting questions still unanswered today. Ruination Talk Kennedy amounted Friday night he may resign from the U.S. Senate if Massachusetts voters have lost confidence in him because of the car accident which killed his young blonde passenger on a lonely Island road a week ago. The first spelling tide of tele- grams and telephone calls in his home state ran strongly in sup- port of tie senator. But across the nation, (he doubts lingered. "I still trust him. But 1 doa't think a lot of people said a college student in Pittsburgh. Kennedy, in a national tele- vision appearance, said there is "co truth vhatevrr" to uglji rumors of immoral conduct that shadow the accident "Nor was I driving under the influ- ecce of he added. Kennedy told a dramatic sto- ry of a night of tragedy and hor- ror in which he twice brushed against the very brink of death, of nearly becoming the third brother to die in sudden calami ty while at a pinnacle of Ameri can political power. And in those terrible mo- ments, he said, he questioned whether some awful curse did actually hang over all the Ken- nedys." y The 17-year-old senator told of the water rushing into his lungs as he fought to escape his sunk- en car after it plunged off a bridge, into an estuary. And he said he nearly drowned again as he swam across a channel from the Island to the village where he had been staying. This was the first explanation of how Kennedy got off the is- land in the nine hours between Study Lunar Samples JL e accident and the time he alked into the police station in jlgartown to report the death. the swim seemed to raise ore new questions instead of uieling old ones. Kennedy appeared on national elevision on the same day he leaded guilty in court to leav- the scene of an accident. A wet-month sentence was sus- pended and be was placed on rotation for one year. The senator said his failure to eport the accident immediately as "indefensible." He said he was confused, tortured, tired. He indicated he still did not re- member all that happened In be nine-hour period. In Berkeley Heights, N.J., the mother of the victim, Jfrs. Jo- eph Kopechne, came out onto a .eighbor's front porch after the iroadcast to say in a halting oice "I am satisfied. with the enator's do ope he decides to stay in the >enate." Kennedy's fellow Democrats ailed.the speech. Republicans fere generally silent. By ALTON BLAKESLEE SPACE CENTER', Hous- ton last the moment has'arrived. .'So long tantal'ized by the moon; scientists today real- ize a 'dream 4- a" close-up look.at rocks stolen from Tand -brought home to earth. "'Vacuum Chamber The 3rama begins' when an aluminum box the size of a itnall.suitcase chamber, in the lunar receiving laboratory at the Manned Spacecraft Center. The .'box weigjis ,J3 pounds total. Inside are about 20 pounds of priceless more than 15 pounds of rocks from the moon, two tubes con- taining, moon stuff dug up. by coring five inches or so down and into the .moon's surface, and an aluminum window shade that captured particles of the siin's atomic solar wind.'. When the box is opened, scien- tists looking a glass window, will for. the first time see close-up rocks from the moon. They were-picked from the moon's surface at Tranquil- lity Base by Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., the first men to walk that planet. The careful process of expos- ing them to initial view is sched- uled (o begin when a crew of technicians comes en duty at {he lunar receiving laboratory. Actual opening of the box will come later bat the time is not For scientists, the rocks will wgin speaking the true story of ow the moon was.born, what ;as happened to it through bil- ious of years, what may be appening to it now. Through their factual story, le rocks will add more solid aowledge, not otherwise ob- tainable, about the earth, the sun, the solar system. They are xrnnd to add r a footnote or a new chapter precise, because no one has ever -710 knowledge of his uni- before had any. experience with handling lunar rocks, Dr. Persa P. Bell of the LRL said. -pip Theme Spudded ill Manila Tal By FRANK CORMIER MANILA' (AP) -'President Nixon launched his effort to per- soade Asian leaders f toward -greater self-help efforts today in talks iwith -President -Ferdinand the'presidential palace Outside, 'anti-American demonstrators' burned a' U.S. 'flag.'; v-While half a million Filipinos gave1 Nixon a warm and friendly welcome on his arrival from a relatively small band the'- palace go home." of youths' outside chanted "Yankee They .threw stones and placards over the main gale and scuffled with police. i Nixon sounded the Asian self- help theme publicly "on his ar: rival at .Manila first leg of the world tour. He departed from his pre- pared text; pay warm tribute to Marcos and to the warm relations between the United Stales and the Pacific is- land nation which was :once an American colony. The trowd responded and peo- ple applauded Nixon the ML Pays Tribute v' To Qapt. Labonte more than five-mile.motorcade pufe Spanish-style'prtsi- lehtial palace where he: was to pebd. the' night The people wanted to'express their, admira- tion. Jof I, the r.U.S moon o: which" JJixon had Just witnessed. The two .'chief executives alked at the, palace for nearly wo alone' and then with aHei, including Secretary of State William.P. Rogers anc >hDippine Foreign Minister Carlos Romulo. NiiMi .will, con- >r with Marcos again Sunday. Nixon then took a boat across he river that flows by. the pa- ace and went by helicopter to a lotel suite meeting with Sen >ergio Osmena Jr., who opposes Marcos la thjj'j-ear'f presiden 3al elections.. Upon arriving at his first stop SEIF-HEIPTHEME Page The N. K. National Guard paid high tribute last night to Captain Roland C. Labonte of Hudson who was killed in Vietnam War action list April H. The ceremonies highlighted the graduation exercises of the 12th diss of the Guard's Military Academy, heid at the training rite In Concord. Seventeen officers were commissioned The Hudson man's widow, Mrs. Lsbonte, accepted' the nation's icconci highest medal, the Silver Stir, from Major General Fran- cis B. McSwiney, jeoeril the adjutant Another honor was accorded the hero. General McSwiney said the training facility In Concord wul be renamed Camp Labonte. Governor Walter Peterson in bis address to the newly commis- sioned officers described Captain Labonte ij true son of New Hampshire and an inspiration to hij feBow officerj." PIZZA by Charles Famous thruoul New England W. PEARL ST. Finest in Pizzas Grinders (an varieties) Regular 90c PLAIN PIZZA TUESDAY' ONLY, 88V-4542 Dpen 11 A.M. fo 2 A.M. MonJlhru Sal. He also said, "I am certain that each of you will be worthy of the sacrifice made by Captain Labonle1." CapUin Labonte, a Nashua High class of 1952, enlisted in .he National Guard'that year anc be was graduated from the slate CCS in 1560. He served with the 2nd Battalion, ITJnd Artillery, a Fort Bragg, N.C., during the Ber in crisis.'- He was recalled to active duty last May with the 3rd Battalion !97th Artillery, which Includes the Nashua area B. Bailery. He was tilled by ah enemy mortar attack. Mrs. Labonte was escorted to the stage where commendations were, inctoding- the 'New Hampshire Commendation Medal the Purple Heart and a speda resolution by the legislature. In addition to other decora tjoos, Captain Labonte' held the Republic of Vietnam Medal. QUARTERLY State Federal TAX RETURNS ARE DUE For Assistance- .Call FRED ACKLEY 883-3912 verse. The scientists will look at and escribe each rock, then put hem in special vacuum cans or later analysis and use. Next, they plan to take one of be core, specimens, pulverize part of it, inject this Into mice which have .been reared to be otally free of microbes, then ee if they get sick. If they do, it means the moon harbored some trange germ unless you can prove the mice became sick rom germs tot the astronauts, of; their spacecraft, carried up o the moon. Then they will tes] rock speci- mens for potential danger by exposing a variety of living hings on algae to rock material. Next they plan chemical ihysical, and other examina tions of the rocks in the space center laboratory. And finally the NASA scien lists will break some of the rocks into smaller specimens and distribute them to 143 prin cipal investigators and 600 col aborators around the world s: iey can make detailed ana' yses as to what the rocks from he Sea of Tranquillity say i the real story of the moon. A second box of moon male- rial arrived at the LRL Friday at 10 p.m. EOT. It weighed 5! pounds; officials estimated tha about 31 pounds of that it lunar rock and dirt. It, too, was start ed'fnlo the 'vacuum chambei process. Dr. Elbe'rt A: King, LRL cura tor, said' small' areas- of gra corrosion on the1 polished alum' num of'the'sec'ohd box were no immediately explained. VI don't think it's lunar mat he said.' "It possibly wa picked up at the cape (Kenne dy) or in landing (on Amherst Building Leveled by Fire Nashuan Hit After Pulling Gun on Police EVERETT, Pa. A Nashua N.H. man wai shot by a Pennsyl vania state trooper after polling a gun on (he officer when be wa stopped en a tompike for exces- sive speed. State police Capt Chirks Graa In Harrisburg identified the inan as '31-year-old John Kecna of Nashua. Graci says Keraia was shot in the'stomach 'and taken to Bed- ford Memorial Hospital where he is hi" "fairly good condition." Grief'said Kenna was being cUsed by trooper Alfred Haass, who was later Joined by Troopers Ronald Ceyba and Douglas KaV According fo police Kenna uHed Info the opposite lane ind sfarled going'east against traffic. When the trooper! puHed the car over to' the side of the road. Grid said Kenna jumped out and pointed "the gun it CeVbi. Re said Ceyba issued a warning then fired. AMHERST-A bam located on the Stearns Road in Amherst was destroyed last night in a spec- tacular fire that could be seen For miles against the black sky. A'total of i: fire trucks from neighboring towns wwe required to control the blaze. Richard G. Crocker, one of the two fire. wards of the Amherst Fire Department, said that the first alarm call was sounded at fclS. By the time the trucks ar- rived at the scene, he said, the whole roof of the building was gone. He noted that the firemen then concentrated their efforts on sav- ing the eH and bouse which ad- join the of which are landmarks In Amherst. The fire, of undetermined cause, destroyed several tons of hay. Until the accident, Kennedy, the No. J Democrat in the Sen- ate as assistant majority leader, had been regarded as a front- runner for the Ifll nomination for the prize that brought his two brothers to death- Kennedy's speech was his list explanation beyond a brie! talement to police'last Satur- day. Unanswered Questions It still left unanswered these key questions: Kennedy was "on the dirt road leading to the' narrow wooden bridge where car >lunged into a salt-water Lnltt' The senator told police he made a wrong lara driving Misj Ko- pechne to the island ferry after a reunion party. At a T-intersec- ion, the only paved road on the tarns left toward the 'fer- ry and Is marked with an'ar- row; the dirt road goes right. In Weekend Edition Stock Lists Teert-Age Page Exfra Comics be television speech; h'e no mention it all of the turn. 'happened when ht >lunged into the water to swim rom the island to EdgartovnT Kennedy 'said two friends, Jo- seph Gargan and Paul Mark- iam, had helped him dive for Miss Kopechne after the acci- dent He said he was confused and in shock. Kennedy said they took him to the ferry landing and he suddenly jumped into tht water to begin swimming, al- most drowning in Did Gargan and Markham watch' his struggle without tele- phoning authorities .'f.or :help? Or. if they had left and were un- aware, of the. swim, werta t they concerned about where the Iron- bled. Kennedy had gone? Why did they take no apparent action that would have summoned offi- cials? TED'S FVnJRE Page 1 Derry Mtiri, 59; Victim or rire DERRY of..41 East Broad- way, died, of smoke inhalation last night as the result of a freak accident home. According-'to'-Fire Chief'Waiter Bo'yce, Brett ap- parently had opened a-book of matches which ignited, setting his bed -clothes on fire..' .He was by Rockirig- harn County medical referee Wjlliam Hart; whp attribu- ted death to smoke inhalation.' Boyce said, but fans were 'used torrid the building of smoke. The fire alarm was sounded at a.m. Recall-was sounded at i To Join Opponent df By JOBN W. F1NNEY Niw York Timii Nlws Stnrict WASHlNGTON-Opponents of the'Safeguard missile system, on the defensive the past week, believe about to re- capture the i Initiative by. pick- ing up the vote of Sen. Thomas one of the uncon> mitfed scheduled.to an- nounce in a Senate speech Mon- day ihat he will vote for the opposition amendment- prohibit- ing any deployment of the Safe- guard- antiballistic ml if He Hudson Company Is Low Bidder On Road Project CONCORD Robert Levesquc at Hudson submHied a low bid of lot ItiO federal aid re- construction project in Sullivan and Nelson, according to the N Jl. Department of Public Works and Highways. The agency said the work involve the reconstruction of a one >nd one-third mUe section of the Franklin Pierce Highway in those two towns. Submitting the second lowest bid of J707.S77 was the Palazzi Corporation of HookselL Coming soon to Nashua Trust MASTER CHARGE The Interbank Card Member C Crocker explained that th property recently changed hands and the current owner, Bertram Robcrge, had not yet occupied the buildings. As a result, no farm equipment or animals were lost Crocker added that last night's fire was a "perfect example of mutual aid at work." Besides the three trucks from Amherst, two rom Hollis, one from Brookline, "wo from Mont Veroon, and four !rom Milford responded to the fire. Other neighboring towns stood by in the stations that sent :rucks, he said. The firemen were at the scene until a.m., and two men re- mained on duty all night. The Slearns Road property, be- tween Route 122 and the Boston Post Road South, is known to lo- cal residents as the 'old Wright place.' H was the site of several horse shows approximately IS years ago, when it was known ai the Snow Hoiloway Farm. There was no immediate estimate of damage and authorities are con- tinuing their investigation. (ABM) year.. With system in the coming the New Hampshire Democrat, the opposition be- lieves it can count on at least 9 two" short of a are the ad- ministration's Safeguard de- loyment plan. Administration spokesmen he Senate are claiming a mini- mum of SI voles In favor of CALIFORNIA HOUSE PAINT SALE NOW ON AT Nashua Wallpaper Co. 129 W. Pearl St. 82- Thurs. Til TONIGHT IN THE TELEGRAPH Abby 7 Church 5 Classifieds 14, 15, 18, 17 Comics Crossword 7 Editorial 4 Financial Horoscope 14 Obituaries J Pearson 4 Rtsfon Social Suburban Teen Television Theaters Dr. Thostcson 7 Weather Wicker Women's Page EVERY NIGHT IS SHOPPING NIGHT AT NASHUA MALL 30 Great Stores Open Til Monday thru Sat. in'this claim appear to be some; un- committed .or wavering senafo'rs who ma'y go with OK opposition: The outcome; on the ABM is- sue, to turn on a few wavering or uncom- raitlcd senators, such as P.-Anderson, Will and G. Magnuson Is bilieved .leaning towkrd -the 'oppositfon, bat he Is under heavy pressure from his junior Henrj- M. to vole 'with the administration. has been'wavering bat at this'point Is believed leaning toward (he administration. 'The' outcome, therefore, could turn on 'the vote 'of one of'the more independent 'members of the-Senate'who says'be' has made up his mind but'will not divulge'his decision until the roll It called. The Mclntyre- shift 'against the administration pro p'.o i.a I gave a, opposition, which "in the" past week had of Its-mo- mentum and privately had been cone the administra-; tion was gaining the upper hand in. -the three-week-old. debate. With the admldstra- tion atsftVlost 'a-'possible fall- back 'posiiioVif it appeared its Safeguard 'deployment plan vwas about To .-la an at tempt to strike' a compromise between (he ad- ministration and.the opposition, Mclntyre has .been .sponsoring an amendment.that mit start and'computer systems-rbut- .not', :he.' InitlaV Iwo Safeguard sites in Montana and North Dakota. Since, the: administration.plahi call' for or de- ployment of the Int'efceplorrmls- SENATOR-McINTYRE Pretty i A thirsty plant on Main Street gets near.a store where she'.is employed. a refreshing drink from Debra Howe, The urn Js one of many strategically- who keenly watches the'growth 'of 'placed1 M the downtown area.' the flowers and shrubs Jn the um   

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