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Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: July 19, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - July 19, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle In one respect the fashioned kitchens were bet- ter than the modem ones they had oH-f asWoned house- wives in them. New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspopcr Weather Tonight, Fair and Cool Sunday, Little Change Full Report on Page Two VOL 101 NO. 118 ContiBuinj the Hampshire Telezrapb October ISM NASHUA. NEW HAMPSHIRE. SATURDAY. JULY 1949 Second Class Postage Ptid At Nashua, N.H. 20 PASES PrTct TEN CENTS U.S. Astros Head For Lunar Orbit Moon Touchdown Set for Tomorrow By HOWARD BENEDICT SPACE CENTER, Houston (AP) Apollo ll'i explorers raced into the.shadow of the moon today and reported a spectacular first sighting of their tar- get as they prepared to blast Into Junar orbit to start two days of great human adventure. As they darted into an area where the moon Wotted out the sunlight at 850 a. m. EOT, commander Neil A: Armstrong reported picking out lunar features il- luminated by light'reflected by earth. Reports Corona He brilliant solar corona as ,the moon ec- lipsed all but the halo of gases inn.- '.'It looks like an eerie the Apollo 11 commander said. Armstrong, Edwin E.. Aldrin Jr. and .'Michael Collins were just 11.000 miles from the moon and closing In at nearly miles an hour when they report- ed the first sighting of the lunar landscape after three days' in space. The astronauts.headed for a climactic moment in early aft- ernoon Vhen'they trigger their spaceship engine to steer into a precise orbit 69 miles'above the lurface. The Jiring :was scheduled for p.m: with the spaceship be- hind the moon, out of radio con- tact. The world was not to know whether the. engine ignited erly until the craft reappeared around the edge of the moon 26 minutes later. he sail "I guess what's tiring it that three dimensional effect is earthshine. I can pick out features. on the moon in earthshine. I see the crater Ty- cbo fairly clearly. I can see the sky all around the moon, even oa tbe it, where there's no earthshine or sunshine." Armstrong said he could see the corona light extending out about 200 diameters from the moon. With .the. glare of the sun masked by (he moon, Collins said "it's a real change for us. Now we're able to see stars again and recognize consteflj- (ions for.the first time on the trip. "The sky's full of he added, "It looks tike it's night side on earth." "I guess it's turned into night up there early, hasn't com- mented mission control. Collins said that despite the sudden darkness, the earth- shine, or light reflected from siimv, "gut iciiirvitru Jiuui The astronauts have the op: earth, was bright enough in the flTl tn If n VirwtV ki. tioh to cancel the Ignition if they detect i anything wrong. Without firing, Apollo 11 merely would loop once around the backside and head bade to of cabin to read a book by. Apollo 11 was on such .an accurate course that controllers canceled .a small correca'vi rocket Tiring scheduled ,'thli .he. buiU-In- safety measures of morning and told the astronauts the mission._ to. get. a ,couple extra hours In the shadow, of the moon, Jleep. "Turn the ground told The Moon and ApoHo 11 landing site ,nay be.a envelope the .astroriauls en-thelorously until his.feet.are under moon.' his center of gravity, the [astro- .this vacuum their suits nant could stand again. be tightly inflated by theirl It would, an ex- SULLIVAN, York iirrict HOUSTON, Texas The two men scheduled to be the first to tread on (he moon early to Monday may find that walking more than a is notMhe best way -to ''get bend up objects breathing oxygen, making it im-ihaus'ting effort. More probably him th Vision V lo oper- ,-Another'proble'm is that the moon, they havejbnlkiness of the moon'suits will been an, arTay.iimit- the astronauts'--vision. Especial .tools.- While Armstrong is to collect planning the activities of (he astronauts, Neil A. .Armstrong and Edwin R Aldrin Jr., dur- ing their two hours and 4} min- utes on the moon. Another center Lind strated- what the well-equipped must have and how .he will use. each piece of equipment He aisp_answered a soon a s he' steps onto the moon, and put the bag in his big pocket, he wiH-be unable to see tie pocket He will have to find .it by feel. Yet his sense rf touch range of questions. lvvl. ,m Another -possibility, he said for example, will hap- be greatly duDed.by his'heavy today, Is that a-loping walk pen if one roan falls down? clothing. with slow, three-foot strides Will he; like an ancient ar-j One of the first tasks of the will prove most' efficient. No knows, because there has een no way to simulate on artli the deep vacuum that '.Una-replied thai by doing a pushup and then aiier cney open tne hatch of the lunar module that lands them on the idoo'n may be (o dean off their porch 'and front steps. Lind -pointed 'out tliat as: the descent stage rocket Masts downward, slowing 'the final descent, it wal drive its gases down into the lunar material. This will probably carve a shallow crater, throwing -debris out to the sides, -not in billowing clouds (since there is no air) bnt in -arching trajectories.- Some of the rocket exhaust may spread -out- thousands, of :said, .but that which is driven -.into .'the surface .Immediately below the rocket- will be. unstable. Soviet JODRELL BANK, Englwd AP) Jodrell Bank astrooo-Tier! said the Soviet unmanned Luna-1! probe changed its orbit Ignificantfy this afterr.oon sfler nrcling the moon in 'an' unal-ered course for 'more than 'two Scrtntisls speculated thai the may have been sent on its My- back to earth. But 'they idded this could not be confirmed. They said It. also. is 'possible ihat Lena 15 had changed its to 'head toward the moon. ,i The announcement that 15 had changed course during its Z7th orbit was made by Sir Bernard observatory director, after a radio telescope had delected a number'of new elements In (he probt's performance.- :.r During 25lh orbit, the probe had transmit led radio signals for an hour, its longest transmission, and had gone info a stabilized Earlier It had bttn reported spinning as 11 orbited. i Prof. John C. Davies, LoTell's aide, said Luna 15 bad transmitted data the whole. time it was behind the moon on nth circuit the.first time it ha'd done so..- If Luna 15 -did 'leave the tax-a's vicinify at tthu line it would, fit to with the message from Soviet scientists Friday informing US. space officials thai the probe'.would stay, In lunar orbit for two rowic 7 Cfcurch Comics. IS, Crossword 1} Editorial. 4 Financial J Horoscope 7 Obituaries i Pearson" IN-' EGRAPH SocUIeV 10, 11 Sports-.V H Teen S Television rheatc'rs IS. Or. Thastcson w Weather Women's Paze 8 PIZZA by Charles Famous thruout' New England 10 ff. PEARL ST. Finesl in Pizzas '-Crindefs (aD varieties} Regular 90c PLAIN PIZZA TUESDAY 7 Cc ONLY; 'Oc Teliphtni Open 1 1 A.Mi Vo 2 'A.M. Men. thru 3 P.M, to Special About FREE CHECKING AT talarjice if you're under 65 and 'r Member, down, tins gas may burst prevent escape of any. lunar into the vacuum of space, ducing a small eruption of have .been provided to face material that could blanket lower parts' of the -by squeezing the instrument's, double han- module.. .to _opeh spring loaded 1 However as soon as rods dangling from three legs of the descending LM touch the at.-'iti, base. With' this he can pick op fist-sized rocks and put them' in1 his specimen face a light will flash 'inside the cabin, if the astronauts t A scoop with a'- bucket like that of 'ste'aav shovel "can1, be down the engine promptly, the Hast effects should be "-J to' collect loose 'lunar material. mizeo. Cannot Stoop The moon's tools are -the astronauts -cannot in the modular equipment an extension handle has age area, or between provided. that caii be at- legs of the lower stage of Jo the. scoop. LM. .When opened, half the Mesa, drops down, like a said an '.attempt .would also be made -to. capture, and large suitcase .with' lop and home a'little lunar tom compartments, so 'thai is known' that th e m 6on' has entire 'interior accessible (o oa the true, atmosphere, but leakage of'gaj'iroin its intenbr may Inside are two coated Us surface with an each .slightly larger than a 'thin layer' of primir- patch case and designed to heavier' gases.' hermetically sealed lest high-vacuum containers, specimens be contaminated byjeach the size1 'of- a" coffee' Hudson Muriier LAS VEGA; Nev. -'.George Gil-jfishing trip off 'Gloucester, Mass., formerly; of Hudson, Gilbert was N.H., wafted out of county- 1 jst February on a north here yesterday free, mm .Vegas roai i judge ordered him released Salem, the -district charges he killed his wife on of Esex 'Coority said a boating trip off (he warrant wBl be sousht setts coast.' Gilbert charging him with The judge granted a motion for the slaylrig' of Ms wife. '-a'-, trrtt f-htroeA thai tt 'jt..1 _ "_ have been p'rovideduo that lu- nar samples'! can.' be. collected with a minimum of, danger of atmospherics, contamination. They the in them- are.Vacuu 91 sealed. In .their am- bitious' the the man- ner of 'earti-iJc-und'-geologisU, except that theif .field notes .will be made Instead of cp the Hanging from.a ring on the m oon JHJ a., s'.'ck of small, -numbered spe elm en bags. The select an interesting specimen, photo- graph and describe.Ms loca- tion .and appearance .to those mdniloring the sequence at the space center here- He wdrtheri.pick Jt up, yank a sp'ecjneh the ring and report, the 'number to.earth before1 closing and 'stowing It in a large collection bag on his waist. A team .of some ,10 special Ists in lanar geology will be "watching" from, a special room here.' When the'astronauts res they expected to do often from nec- will''ask; for sug- gestions from those on earth whVhavVbeen'shown'lhe' local Soon after landing a television sweep of the 'entire' panorama from the high windows and halch ii' planned. "It's a'viry marked three'di- the solar maneuver, corona coming from'behind the VJS. ASTRO.VAUTS Pift 1 Lull In Viet By RICHARD PYLE SAIGON (AP) American Ircopj killed 17 enemysoldiers suffered no casualties in a four-hour-battle near Tay Nina City, 50 miles northwest of Sal- jon, military spokesmen said today. The fight six'miles northeast of the'key provincial capital, which Allied Intelligence says, may be the "main target of-a new enemy drive, was the only major disruption reported as the battlefield lull' entered its fifth week. The. battle Friday involved troops of the 33th Infantry Dirl B5J bombers struck around Tay Ninh and it enemy positions at the ol Black Virgin Mountain. Thiea Replies South Vietnam' President Nguyen Van Thlea, answering questions at a newt conference, said he did not believe U.S. and South Vietnamese policymakers should read political impli- cations Into the battlefield lull. He said the Communists hare decreased their battlefield ac- tivity many limes, three or four times this year alone, but only to rest add re-equip their forces. Thied'aiso said that i "very ftiportant part1' of U.S. troops could be' withdrawn' from Viet- nam only if sufficient .U.S. equipment and funds are forth- coming. He also said he would aVwrit, .which charged that pa-. 'At 'the time'of Mrs. Gilbert's filed Improperly when CflbaU'SiJ been rair- m P5." had three MajV........' chDdren. '.Cabeh had filed The body "of, Mary Cflbert, before was'found nine months, after" the a i- EVERY NfGHt' IS. SHOPPING NIGHT NASHUA '.30 Great Stores? thru ;Sat. r trtC .'and cabin Garry A ,qf CABOTS j Paints I' Wekend Sfocfc 1'ls.fs _. Teen-Age Page Exfro Comics QUARTERLY -State- Federal :TAX RETURNS''ARE DUE 11 883-3912 lo all he could so that Souti Vietnamese troops could "re- place" American troops. Thieu's opinion of the lull was in accord with the expressed views of most American com- aanders in Saigon. They be- iev'e the Communist command s girding for another "high point" in its sporadic summer campaign. After the news conference, Thieu met with Gen. Earls Wheeler, chairman of.the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff: Wheeler was. accompanied to Independ- ence Palace by Adm. John Mc- Cain Jr., U.S. commander in the Pacific; Gen. Creightoa W. Abrams, commander of U.S. troops in Vietnam; and Deputy U.S. Ambassador Samuel 'Ber- ger. Wheeler and McCain are on a four-day tour of Vietnam to as- sess the lull and the battlefield situation. They were expected to discuss with President Thieu the prospects for further withdraw- als of American troops beyond the now being pulled out. The fight near Tay Ninh City flared Friday morning when U.S. troops ran into an enemy force of unknown size, a U.S. headquarters communique said. The fight was the biggest Iff- volving American forces where in country since U.S. 1st Infantry Division troops and air strikes killed 31 enemy in virtually the same area July 11. Gity Soldier, 20, Killed In Vietnam 'Army Dennii Lorden, M, Company, ililford, before enterins son of .Mr. and Mrs. jen-fce. He received his basic Lorden of M Concord' St. vis training at Fort FoQr, U. in Vietnam, according to The Lordcns said they had no specific Informitioo regarding dfcunutancei of their ion's, death. Tbe youth hid been in South TO Open on Monday Industries and stores here'will' Vietnam with.. the Army's 101st be operating as usual Mondiy, a Airborne Division since Nov'em-spokesman for Greater Nash-; ber. Rccentry, he had teen trans- ua Clumber of Commerce iaH i fared tn the llth Inftntry Diri- today. f sloti, attached to the Marine ;A check of IndustrUi ard cbnunerdal estiWishrnenls, uorps. r j .'A lifelong resident U this area, toUier had atteoded Bishop Gnertio Hlfh School, and bad been etnptcytd at toritn Lumber 'plans to; call off work to celebrate moon landuig' holiday by PresldeBt Ntoi A   

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