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Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: July 17, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - July 17, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle Most college campuses arc so crowded, if a student wants to be alone, he has to go to class. Stock Prices At Noon Nashua New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspaper _J 9- 100th YMT As A Dfiity Newspaper Weather Tonight, Cloudy, Worm Friday, Hot and Humid Full Repott on Page Two VOL 101 NO. Cootinainj New Hampshire Telegripb Established October 1SJ1 NASHUA. NEW HAMPSHIRE, THURSDAY, JULY 17. 1969 Second Class Paid At Nashua, N. H. 24 PASES TEN CENTS Apollo 11 Halfway To The Moon cans with Bv HOWARD BENEDICT "SPACE CENTER, Hous- ton (AP) Three Ameri- speeding to a date history reached the halfway point of their journey to the moon today. They awakened on their first morning in space and plunged into check of the pacecraft systems on vhich their adventure de- Sleep Seven Hours Spacecraft commander These two young men found a unique way to keep cool yesterday at Field's Grove. They beat- the 100-degtee' heat by. using their heads. ,0rie thing for .didn't stay "pail" in all that .suh..The ''fxjur'! fellqjv getting the water is Darren Neil L Armstrong and Air Force Lt. fcl. Michael Collins reported laving slept seven hours. Air Force CoL Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. said he slept five and one-half ours. After reviewing the flight plan or the day, astronaut Bruce JcCandless at Mission Control ;ave the crew a news report hat ranged from Russia's Luna 3 spacecraft to. Mexico's re- luiring hippies to hive haircuts jefore entering that country. On that No. 2 item, we al ;ot haircuts before we Collins commented. There was no immediate reac- tion to the Russian announce- ment that Luna 15 had become another Moscow report gave no The hint ia space, the Apollo 11 com- aznd ship and lunar module, inked nose-to-nose, were HJ.flO miles from earth and heading for the moon at a speed of 3.2S9 miles an hour. So accurately was Apollo 11 aimed at the moon that mission controllers decided (o cancel plans for a midcourse correc- tion Wednesday, but planned a imaU rocket burn today to tune up the flight path. In a near-flawless perform- ance, the spacecraft Wednesday developed only two trouble spots, both of which mission controllers said posed DO threat to the mission. The controllers said a flow in- dicator in an oxygen vent usec to force waste water into space was giving a reading thought to se too low. Controllers said they bad devised a test for today to determine if the sensor was al fault. They said alternate sys lerns were available. Collins also reported some dif flculty in making star sightings Controllers attributed this to the attitude of the spacecraft in re- lation to the stars used in Ihi sighting. They said sligh changes in attitude caused the stars to "move" more than Col lins expected when he was using whether the unmanned space- craft would try to land and then return moon soil to the earth, as some reports have speculated. The Apollo 11 crew has main- tained a business-like attitude ever since their Wednesday launch at Cape Kennedy. Fla. Unlike their predecessors on Apollo 10, they have'held their chatter with mission control to the on-board navigation equip- ment. The astronauts beamed to arth an unscheduled te television transmission fednesday, using the color camera of the command mod- ile. Keeping the camera focused an the Earth. Armstrong, after epeated urging by the ground, gave a brief travelogue. From miles out in ipace, Armstrong said, the crew could see most of North Ameri- ca and parts of south America. "We have not been able to vis- ually pick up the Hawaiian is and chain, but we can clearly see the western coast of North Vmerica, the United States, the San Joaquin Valley, the High Sierra and Mexico." said Arm- strong, and then as far south to the northern coast of south America. "I'm not sure you'll be able to see all that on your screens down he said. The television view showei the earth as a greenish-blue bal streaked with clouds. "Hey, Aldrin quipped at one point, "you sup pose you could turn the earth a little bit so we could get a IIlll more than just "Roger, a flight contro ler deadpanned. "I don't thb APOLLO HALFWAY Page Local Woman, 48, Dies in Accident As Area Sizzles A Nashua woman was killed mbrhtng'in a angle 'car accident'on Route .85 to Newbury- Mass, police reported. -The victim'was Loretta Rode, 48, of 1 Faxm St. Police said she died of fractured skull, numer- ous fractures and multiple In- juries. Obituaries co Page The accident occurred at about 7-a.m. near the- Newburyport, Mass., tit? lira, just south of the Massachusetts state police sai no other vehicles were invdn in the crash. Authorities said the'.death ca was apparently traveling' tout in the passing lane when it earn into contact with the media curbing, veered to the opposi side of the two-lane highwa struck a guardrail, and flippec over. State police said they had n other details and-'that ruvestiga tion is continuing. In. Blaze Of Apollo Michael Collins 'arid Lunar Module past a waving Old Glory as Pilot Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., who it lifts the three astronauts into earth onto the moon a- few minutes Vorbit'.and eventual 'the 'after; Armstrong- on Monday.. (AP ,'moonj Aboard are Commander :Neif'Wirepholo) A. Command Module Pi- Monday To Be Moon Holiday j tf By JOHN HAERIGAN actions in the Nashua rea' yesterday and today re any m any lembers of the human ace became amphibious. Pools Jammed Historians tell us man first came the water. Area pools, ponds nd puddles bore out that theory s the heat wave continued to ash thermometers towards the frdegreb mark today. Field's Grove was jammed yes-3-day and today. Centennial Pool -is mobbed by hundreds cJ iTasfong, screaming kids. Not to be outdone, backyard en-jusiasls filled plastic pools or set p hoses' to wash' the' beat away. Although the temperature in the untight' hit the 100-degree mark n 'downtown Nashua, the Permi-Jack' pumping station recordei high yesterday of only 85. The tow" forlhe day was the Imcber. During the. the nercory "dipped" lo only 66 las light, causing area air ondition-srs to human- right far, the Nashua area has jeen spared the' usual -cases oi eat prostratico and collapse. Nashua police made three am: jeslerday and to-ay, but in all 'cases the heat was not a Jrown Acquitted n Robbery Case, Jut Rearrestecl .COXCORD, Brown, 0, of Nashua was acquittec fednesday of a charge of bank robbery, ihen charged with assault and attempting kidnaping. Brown had been charged with a.kuig part in 'the Feb. 13 rob-pery of a branch of the Second National Bank of Nashua of Judge' Hugh Bowies of U.S. Xstrict Court acled because oi ack'of positive eyewitness identification. -Brown waj rear-rested immediately on the other charges in connection '.with ran escape attempt last- April while in f ederal.custody in Concord. He pleaded Innocept jo the new diaries and. was .transferred 'to Wai pole State Prison in Massachusetts. bail was 'the record will hold P. is a matter of speculation, lowever, for the area is in' for aore of the jaroe. City By CLAUDETTE DUROCHER a Monday, will be' a J holiday for city employes but it n appears the day will be business as usual for most of private in- j1 dusUy here. Mayor Dennis J. Sullivan said he has given city employes lion- day ofi to honor President Richard M Niion's request that. the day be declared a holiday to r celebrate man's first landing on the moon. Sullivan noted that he has the authority to call a holiday only for Department of Public State nd City Hall office employes, but "1 dded that he felt other depart- we lents would follow suit. sine A check with several; of Naih- ica' a's largest industrial plants Sou xmd that no decision had been Me! ladecri giving workers a. holi- rial ayl The same applied. to banks. N The Greater Nashua Chamber dec f Commerce reported it has not day cccivcd any reports yet of stores he T businesses which plan to close, cas "I think there'll be no decision n that until Ihe company officials n uve had a chance to talk it an 'was a typical response pven, by tspokcsmen for various pui irmsy T Slate HoBday nor 'Gov. Walter Peterson has de- an( dared Monday, a day off for a jiajority of the stale's em- ?lwes. be The Hillsborough County Superi- x Court which had hearings ,j scheduled ''In Manchester for Honday; has' postponed them to jT; Thursday, July 24. In other parts of the stale, Salem town oficials have one uppcd Nixon's Monday holida declaration." In addition to closing all mu- all nicipal. buildings; and giving em- ployes a paid holiday, town of- KC RcUls decided that July. 11, 1569 will be called "Moonday." Several governors and may- ors have. already honored Prcsi- dent Nixon's request that they ho declare a holiday Monday logo celebrale man's first landing on H he moon. cr 15 Orb By ANDREW TORCHIA JODREIL BANK. England (AP) The Soviet Luna 15 probe rocketed into orbit around [he moon today. Jodrell Bank astronomers said they expected an attempt to land the unmanned craft on the moon by Friday morning. Observatory director Sir Bernard Lovell said Luna 15 was in an eliptical orbit almost exactly two hours long and 600 to l.JOO miles above the moon. He added after checking his big radio telescope, the Moon nain listening post for Luna IS .nee it was launched Sunday, hat it was sending back heaps" of data. The official Soviet news Tass said in Moscow that jina 15 had become an artifi-ial satellite of the moon, a tatemenl interpreted in the tussian capital as possibly neaning no landing atlemp! irould be made. Sir Bemarc >aid he did not believe this. "It simply doesn't make sense o create another lunar satellite at this stage of the Soviet Lovell call for te'mpejature o agaia "reach the upper 90s to-ay, the long-range forecast aHi for continued heat until Sat-rday or Sunday. The heat wave is state-wide. la be northern part of Use state, he thermometer at Errot, near [Jmbagog Lake, read K. Also victimized was the Lakes Region, xtiere-the temperature hovered iround the lower Ms and stayed in the 80s" until late >t night The' U.S. Weather Bureau forecast for today calls for another air, hot, and humid 14 hours, with temperatures climbing to ihe 90s. Agree By CHARLES GREEN TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) Honduras and El .Salvador each agreed to a cease-fire in heir three-day-old war Wednesday night, but each nation attached conditions, which delayed an end to the fighting. 0 AS Request A peace committee of the Organization of American Slt'.es lad asktd the' warring Centra American neighbors to agree to a peace plan which unofficia sources said called for: return to territorial am on Cea tions that existed before the Rghling broke out with each nation's armed forces pulling back three miles behind Its borders. for the life and ise-Fir El Salvador also agreed to the Ian but on condition that the provide machinery ade-uate lo enforce the agreement, t demanded particularly that more than Salvadorans iving in Honduras be' protected against "persecution." Diplomatic sources in Wash-ngton said after an OAS council meeting the Honduran government had agreed lo allow an >AS committee to inspect its territory to check on the treatment of the Salvadorans living there. El Salvador had charged Honduras with expropriating property of immigrant Salvadorans, of committing atrocities oa hem and of massing Honduran 'orces on the border for an at ack. El Salvador said this was the reason for its Invasion Mon day. Troops of the two countries continued lo shoot at each other Although commonlqnf! e Plan both sides spoke of heavy fighting, there was no accurate estimate of casual ties. Unconfirmed reports In El Salvador said that Salvadoran .roops opened a third front by driving toward the town of Mar-cala, a few miles inside Hondo-ran leiritory. The other fronts are around S'ueva Ocotepeque, a town Just over the border in western Honduras and around Nacaome, in touthern Honduras, 13 miles inside the country- and 75 miles from Marcala is almost halfway between the two towns. Each side also claims it has wiped oat the other's small air force. Claims Lhltd El Salvador has an army of men and Honduras has The Salvadoran posh caught Honduras by surprise. The town's .civilians fled toward nearby s To NOTATTHE Am-CONDirrdNED .'-NASHUA MALL -QUARTERLY -Federal RETURNS ARE DUE .1 For Assistance' f CaH.FRED ACKLEY 883-3912. of citizens of one country living in the other. military observers lo itt that the cease-fire Is observed. end (o hostile radio and press propaganda in both countries. Honduras agreed lo the plan on condition that El Salvador withdraw the Iroops that invaded Honduras. Honduras said it would pall back its forces three miles from the Al Will if Learn the facts ab Missiles on TV; .TUN ,STQN GHAh w John Wt the -IN" THE TELEGRAPH n Abby 18 Pearson 4 Classifieds Reslon 4 M FOLLOWING STORES WILL BE OPEN THURSDAY FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M. BERGERON'S CARTER'S MEN'S SHOP ENTERPRISE DEPT. STORE I) ISIDORE'S HAIR STYLING JORDAN'S LUGGAGE SHOP LYNCH'S MEN'S BOYS' STORE MILLER'S SEARSROEBUCK 20th CENTURY High St Sports 16. 17 Crossword 20 Suburban 10. It Editorial 4 Sulzburcer 11 Financial 8 Television 17 Horoscope 18 Theaters 19 Lawrence 4 Dr. Tbosteson 19 Nashua Scene 4 Weather 1 Obituaries 2 Wicker 13 IN. !GHt !NEb9 9iOO.P.M. Holland '.I." Committee Against So Special About FREE CHECKING AT NASHUA TRUST? minimum balance if you're under 65 ond NONE if you're over. That's what! y Member, Garry A1 FULL LINE of CABOTS Stains Cr Paints Nashua Wallpaper Co. 882-W91 OpeaThurs. TiliJ L_ 1 "If the President suggests il, we ought to go along with him ince this would be one of Amer- ca's greatest said outh Carolina Gov. Robert E. IcN'air as he announced an offi- cial holiday for slate employes. 'Nixon'sigurd a proclamation eclaring. Monday a national day of participation hours after e watched the television broad- of the Apollo 11 liftoff Wednesday. His action gave the day off to federal employes except hose in national security, and public service areas. The President urged gover- mayors, .school officials and private employers to take similar action "so that as many of our as possible will be able lo share in the signifi- cant even Is of that day." He also called upon "all of our people on that historic day to join in prayer for ihe successful conclusion of Apollo H's mission arid Ihe sate return o! its crew." The governors of the nation's two most populous son A. Rockefeller of New York and Ronald Reagan of Califor- 'amohg-the firstla heed the President's holiday re- lest. Georgia Gov. Lester Maddot also granted slate employes day off and added: "I would that the governors and-all the people of lis nation will kneel at ross on the morning when len land on Ihe moon." Other slates where a holidaj; as declared included Oregon, loridai Maryland, Idaho Page J MOOS HOLIDAY PIZZMy Charles thruout New England 147 W. PEARL ST. :inest in Pizzas Grinders (all varieties) Regular 90c PIZZA TUESDAY :ONLY Telephone 88V-4542 3pen 11. 2 A.M Man. thru Sundays 3. P.M. lo   

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