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Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: July 12, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - July 12, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Dry Weather Conditions Threatening Area Apple Crop By DEMSE CAGNON What was expected to be one of the most productive apple crops m New Hampshire In recent years, BOW is anticipated (o yield only tbout the same last crop. Oiiel reason is the recent dry weather, which is threatening (be 1J53 crop and the condition could cause the crrp to be below last year's level According to Hillsborougti Coun- ty Agricultural jjeat Periey Colby, this year's apjte crop hopefully woukj be it bushels in New Hampshire, but a frost on May 27. windy weather which made pollination difficult, and the June drop has caused the estimate to fan to IjOO.OOO bushels, with a chance this amount may faH erea lower. Bali Needed Colby went on to say that the current dry wealher, if it persists, may cause even further harm to this year's crop. MA htUe rain could make a difference of a coupst thousand bushels of apples, anl rain is the be said. He cited the unfavorable weather conditions as being the sole cause of the problem, since apple diseases were kept at a minimum throughout the state this season. Some areas sere Kit harder thaa others. The northern part of New Hampshire appears Dot to hare suffered as macft loss as the southern region. Outside state, the Vermont apple crop is expected to fall considerably be- low last year's mark, which was below average. In the Nashua area, there was wide variation in the extent of damages. The Deny and London- derry areas suffered the most, it was reported. Andrew Mack, one of the diners and operators of the Moose Ilill Orchard in London- derry reported that his crop wiH be smaller, citing the May frost as responsible for claiming 75% of his crop. Se said he had ex- pected bushels, but doesn't pJaa to tale in more than la Hotlis. the story was pretty much the same. Frank Whitte- more of the Brookdile Fruit Farm also reported his crop will fall below last year's. The May frost took S% of his crop, and overall, be said his crop would be 30% kwer than last year. He expects to take in 40.000 as compared to the la Tt.OOO bushels yieHed a year ago. luck was better than Ber- ry's, but not as good as others." be commented Meanwhile, Ben Hogaa reported his crop win be about the same, but expressed concern over the dry weather, indicating that if it persists, bis crop win suffer. "Drought can male a change, and we are hurting for some he feels. Weekend Edition Stock Lists Teen-Age Page f xfra Comics Today's Chuckle Matrimony is the only union that cannot be organ- ized and yel, it is a labor of love that continues to criti- cize management New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspaper Weather Tonight, Cloudy Sundoy, Little Change Full Report on Page Two Full Report on Page Two YOU 10! NO. 112 Continuing tie New Hampshire Telegraph Established October JO. J831 NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE. SATURDAY. JULY 12. 1969 Second Class Postage Paid At Nashua. N. H. 18 PAGES Prici TEN CENTS U. S. Processing Center Hit By Viet Cong Rocket Command said today. The command said the Soviet-built 107 mm rocket exploded Thursday afternoon near the center at Dong Bridge Construction Work has begun on the long awaited bridge across the Merrimack River. Workmen excavate an area for concrete supports for the new span. Begins The Cianchette Brothers firm of Pitts- field, Me., is the contractor. (Tele- graphoto Harrigan) Area By GEORGE McAKTHUK jpast U hours. There was a pos-'alor.g the Cambodian border, mountain, although smaller. SAIGON (AP) An enemy rocket vras fifed into' sibility that the actions foresha-' northwest cf the capital 'fighter bombers and artill-ry a 9th Division processing center just three days a Predicted upsurge inj The U.S. Command reported have pounded it repeatedly. the soldiers were scheduled to eo home the US activity, but for the B5! strikes overnight in Called Nui Ba Den by o II S n-ItliheM Vi'nh -Tl U.S. officers withheld Tarn. Two Americans Killed The rocket killed two Ameri- cans and wounded 21. Eight of these were members of the 4th Battalion, 47th Infantry, which Is scheduled to fly to Ihe United States Sunday. It will be the second 800-man battalion of the 9th Division to leave under President Niion's order to cut U.S. troop strength by men by the end of Au- gust. At about the same time, the Ith Marine Regimental Landing Team will begin moving from near the demilitarized zone to 5uang Tri in central Vietnam before boarding ships for Okina- wa. However, the 9th Marines may be delayed by a typhoon nearing the coast. The withdrawals that have been completed .and are scbed The most sensitive area, how- ever, appeared to be the infil- tration corridor northwest of Province, all hilling the slopes of Black Virgin Moun- tain which dots the area. It was the first time the big ;Strategic Air Command Vietnamese, the mountain long has been an enemy stronghold with a small group of U.S. and South Vietnamese troops on top; Although a lull continued in Saijoa in Tay Ninh Provinceihav. been used against ground fighting, headquarters reports indicated some increase Ji small scale skirmishes and ;hetlings across South Vietnam. The most dramatic firefight reported resulted in the libera- tion of a badly wounded Ameri- can soldier who had been miss- ng and evidently held captive >y enemy forces for two months. An enemy defector reported the location of the wounded man, identified as Spec. 4 Larry 3. Aiken of Jamaica, N.Y., and a South Vietnamese reconnais- sance force went by helicopter into the jungle area about 50 miles southwest of Da Rang. In a sharp firelight, six North Vietnamese were killed and two captured. Then the wounded American was taken by helicop- ter to a field hospital. U.S.-offi- cers .said, the, soldier .was.ro! jets enemy troops on the slopes a'ni Allied forces at bile. By DAVID NYHAN LYNN. Mass.- (AP) Ixptoding chemicals. in a irge; "adhesives factory lew down block 'demolished the roof, nd shattered hundreds of lindows in West' Lynn arty today. No Injuries Police said that no one was hurt, although ozens of homes were evacuat-d as firemen wet down the moking ruins of the main build-ig of the sprawling C.L. Haulaway Sons Corp. "People told me they were nocked right out of said olice SgL James Cheevers. A ow of shops along Western venue, in front of the huge iver Works' plant of General Ilectric Co.; bad their windows lown out. -Extra police from the city's 00-man department were called 9 to guard store windows onlil wners were informed of explosion and asked to secure their stores. "We were sitting in tie cruiser down by City Hall, a mile said Patrolman Richard Jenkinj. "We saw the flash before we. heard the noise. There were two big blasts, then four or five smaller ones. We drove down here and that girder almost hit the cruiser." The girder was a twisted 12-foot length ot room beam that weighed hundreds of pounds. It was thrown skyway by the blast, which shattered windows as far away as a quarter-mile. Police noted that most of the damage came south and east of the one-story, rambling factory building from where the blast originated. "Many ol the 100 or so calls we got right afterward came from down said Sgt. Cheevers, pointing across the narrow Saugus River, which runs along the south side of the factory. Heavy brown smoke noun from the wreckage. Owners ef the plant, which em-toys about 1M persons, told po-ice that no one was supposed to be in the factory, which was shut down for a vacation period. Police investigated the cause, >ut offered no explanation. Th< irm manufactures cement uset n shoe making. "The concussion was said Cheevers of the blast which set off a fire that this weekend involve men. The VS., Command said under its present timetable, (he August withdrawal deadline may be beaten by several in the" firefight 'but were unable to tell exactly how old his wound was. There was little pattern in the skirmishes and shellings reported from about 30 areas in of A dap of joy came tc as she watched the retur of the Army's 3rd Battal fantry, march in 'Seattle group of more than 800 of ordered returne Lis For Area COXCORD-The N.H. Board of Education has distributed to 102 school districts as state aid for the education o! intellectually retarded children. l Newell J. Paire, commissioner of education, said the program has been increased from 452 pupils in 1551-62 to in 1963-69. The law, he said, permits a reimbursement of per pupil but that insufficient funds were appropriated for full implementation of the program. Paire also announced that the state's educators had distributed to 50 school districts as aid for the education of physically handicapped children receiving home Instruction In Funds Schools Amounts distributed to area schools for aiding retarded children, follow: Nashua estimated eligible pupiU, 142, and J16.439; 10.9 and Brookline and 2J1; Deny Cooperative -8.4 and 970; Hollis-8.9 and 14.9 and Londonderry 11.4 and Lyndeboro-3.9 and 450; 12.3 and 8.5 and 981; ifont 3.9 and 450; 1.9 and 219; Salem-lS.J and 2.J2S; Wilton-5 and 577, and J and 231. Aiding physically handicapped: Nashua, J1.465; Deny Cooperative, 252; Hollis, 238; Hudson, 235; Pelham, 88; Salem, 711, and Wilton, Glass littered the streets for Jbcks around the .plant. The brick buildings of the River Works plant, one block east, showed some windows shattered. Had the blast occurred later in the day, police said, hundreds of motorists and pedestrians might have been struck by flying glasj. "The amount of glass breakage is said Cheevers, "but there was not looting. We were fortunate in that respect." Families routed from their sleep by the explosion donned bathrobes and were moved to a street corner several hundred yards from the still-burning Gromyko By ALFRED FRIENDLY JR. Ntw York Timci Ntwi Strrlii BELGRADE Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko, who said that Ms cocatry sought to improve relations with Yugoslavia, will make a format visit here in September or October, a high-ranking Yugoslav official disclosed today. Agreement on the visit culminated an intensive diplomatic exchange beginning with a Rui- Gardner, M( Drowns in fl By HAZEL COTZLX NEW IPSWICH Gregory ieraard, son of Mr. and Mrs. lonald Bernard of Gardner, rfass., drowned in Pratt Pond ere last night, police said oday. According to the authorities, Sernard and (wo of his chil-Iren, and a friend, Rene Sevoie tnd his daughter, also of Gard-ier, were In a row boat which lad a small motor. The boat capsized, about nd the victim was caught un-ler.the craft, while the others me thrown clear. The (wo sen assisted the other two chil-Iren to shore and then swam jack to look for young Gregory, was wearing a life Jacket They found the boy in quick ime and took him (o shore rtere William Johnson of Boy f 6, few Ipswich Ipswich, a nearby camp owner, attempted mouth-to-moo th resuscitation. Police and fire fighters arrived on the scene shortly after and a resustitator was used until 9: JO, but to no avail. Working on the child were firemen James Atbree and David Borcorthell. Dr. Alexandra G. Law of Mil-lard, medical referee, attributed death to accidental drowning. Rene Sevoie suffered exhaustion and he was taken to the Jfonadnock Commnnity Hospital, Peterborough. Heading the police investigation and rescue operations was Chief Nelson LaFreniere, assisted by Officers Paul Card Sr., Earl Dane, Richard Putnam and Alan By CARL P. LEUBSDORF WASHINGTON (AP) After a week of Senate debate opponents cf the Safeguard system remain confident Uiey can either win or force a compromise while backers of the administration's missile defense program insist there will be no retreat. "If they don't compromise we've got them Sen. Philip' A. Hart, cosponsor of one of two compromise amendments Introduced thU reek, said in an Interview. But Sen. John G. Tower, R-Tex., told the Senate: "I'm convinced that acceptance of either amendment would materially weaken cor defense posture. The administration is opposed to the two amendments." The amendment proposed by Hart, and Sen. John Sherman Coooer. R-Ky.. wonld limit Issue program to research with no of any missile corapo-nenls and no authorization for site acquisition. Sen. Thomas J. Hclntyre, D-N.lf., is pushing le other amendment to permit eployment of radar and computer elements while barring the missiles. These amendment! also were rejected Friday by the Pentagon. A spokesman said Secre-ary of Defense Melvin R. Laird wished to express his "unquali-led support for the Safeguard iroposal as submitted by the to Congress." The spokesman, Jerry Fried-leira, replied "that is correct" when asked if Laird opposes 3 compromise. During this first week of on the J29 billion military procurement authorization bill, which contain) J753.1 million Safeguard, there was no apparent efforts to try to wort out an amendment that would fall between the Cooper-Hart and Mc-nlyre proposals. Some senators ce this as the most likely route o a successful compromise. But two and maybe more weeks of debate lie ahead bc-ore any voles take place, and most of those closely involved with Ihe situation expect some discussions to lake place in lhat period between the rival groups. "I expect to soe another mendment coming in Mclnlyre said, possibly from the ranks of some one dozen Republicans who oppose Safeguard and also are agairut the Coop-r-Hart amendment. Mclntyre, suggesting that the administration faces rejection of the entire Safeguard proposal if it pushes ahead, old ministration is going (o have to make up its mind whether it. is going to go for broke or go for a modification. 'TTiey don't have tfie the New Hampshire Democrat said in an Interview. "They'll be iard-nosed this afternoon, but next week they'll begin to crack." The latest Associated Presj of the senators shows 50 op-wing ABM, 43 supporting the administration and two uncommitted. if the uncommitted Is Sen. Winston L. Prouty, R-Vt., PIZZA by Charles Famous Ihrwut New England H7 W. PEARL ST. fines! in Pizzas Grinders (an State Federal TAX REFURNS ARE DUE For Assistance CaD FRED ACKLEY in a speech Monday. Sen. John J. Williams, R-Del., Is the other uncommitted rote. One of the prime spokesmen or Safeguard In the Senate on 'rlday was Sen. Barry Goldna-ter who said he had no doubts at Joy of Seeing the Boys Home narn. The U.S. Command announced today that another, battalion from the 9th Infantry Division will leave for the United States tomorrow. (AP Wirephoto) Ian note delivered here In Belgrade still shared a widt April. The trip itself will be the area of common Interest, first to Yugoslavia by any high- replied by re- evel Soviet official since the on Cze- ouster of Premier Nikita. S. but agreeing, nev- Khrushchev in 1K1. tli. trie Ister at I Nike- sign ilia- went to M ertheless, that the two coun- tries could and should cooper- ate en the basis declaration! issued here and a s vakia last Aug. 21. Yugoslav Communists been open for three years and con' should be honored first. demned the Invasion, and Presl- Interpreting the Russian dent Tito, in a speech just U- agreement to this proposal, a fore the opening of. his party's placed Yugoslav official ninth congress this March, commented, "ihe Soviet Union strongly attacked the Soviet has learned that the boycott Union for repressive interna- icy does not work." Although tonal and foreign poKciej. The Yugoslavia has flatly refused to Sovset Union and all her War- take sides in the Sino Soviet aw Pact allies eicept Romania quarrel, he added, Moscow boycotted the Yugoslav Parly wants all the friends Congress, which waj attended gei. That-j whal Gromy by only 17 non-Yugoslav Com- J.0', Jrffch ij all about." mumst party delegations. Tn a rjnging foreign Regular 90c PLAIN PIZZA TUESDAY 7Cr ONLY 88V-4542 Dpan 11 A.M. to 2 A.M. Msn. thru Saf. Sundayi 3 P.M. fo What's So Special About FREE CHECKING AT NASHUA TRUST? minimum balance if you're under 65 and NONE if you're over. That's what! Member, FJO.I.G, RENT A MOVIE CAMERA CAMERA DUAL 8 PROJECTOR 1SMM SOUND PROJECTOR TAPE RECORDER SLIDE PROJECTOR BankAmerlcard Unicard FOTOMART CAMERA Corp. 178 MAIN ST. JfEIT TO SWTE CI-VEMA Fotoinurt Eb KUHLS MARINE PRODUCTS Available ot Nashua Wallpaper Co. Pearl St. 882-M91 Open Thurs. 'til The chilly atmosphere began policy address to the sixth ses- o change in April when (he So- sioa of the Supreme Soviet in viet Union sent Yugoslavia ?n Moscow, Gromyko said that lide memoire outlining again "although relations do not ler reasons for acting against run the Soviet Czechoslovakia but suggesting government "attaches great lhat, despite differences on importance lo developing rela- some subjects, Moscow and lions with Socialist Yugoslavia." City Planner Asks Delay In Neverett Land Issue all about the rebability of the AHcrmanfc president, M.uricefin i position to be sued by Hi. L. today said be is uncertain Neverett Interests, if the owners ABM. IN THE TELEGRAPH Abby Church Classifieds It Pearson 3 Social Sports H. 17 Teen bovr a proposal by (Sly Planner chose that avenue to settle thi Fred McCulchen to delay the issue. Neverelt purchase by three There are many legal ramifica- monthj wiH fare In the finance Uons to Ite situation. Are! said, committee meeting Tuesday which need to be studied before night. the next step ts taken In the pur- Comics 13, H Television Crossword Jl Theaters Editorial Financial S Weather Horoscope 11 Worccn'i Lawrence Obituaries 9 S Saying, "I wish thaj had been chase proposed. If done three months Afel Are! yesterday proposed that 1) plained lhat he has talked over the property be reappraised to Dr.Thostesoil] the situation with City Solicitor aid the city in determining Arthur p. Gormley Jr. purchase offer. Pwe He taid Gormley advised him UcCutchen leeks a three-month that delaying tie purchase further delay so he can undertake a tfudy it IWj point may place the tity of City Hall expansion   

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