Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - July 1, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Today's Chuckle If you can't get away for a vacation, just tip every third person you meet and you'll get the same feeling. Nashua New Hampshire's Largest Evening Newspaper Weather Cooler Tonight Foir on Wednesdoy Report On Page Two VOL 101 NO. 104 Continuing the New Hampshire Telegraph Established October M. NASHUA. NEW HAMPSHIRE, TUESDAY, JULY I, 1969 Second Class Postage Paid At'Xuhui, X. H. 34 PASES Prito TEN CENTS Royal Train Is Rocked By Bomb Notables Escape Injury; Prince Charles Invested Squinting Squirt Ever have the problem of being too short and the water bubbler squirt too high? That's what Richard Young of 10 Salem St., had to con- tend with. With a little help from the Atherton Avenue playground instructor, Richie finally got his drink. CAERNARVON, Wales to Caernarvon The (AP) A bomb shook the royal train that brought Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles today to his investiture here as the Prince of Wales. Witnesses said the ex- plosion tore up a section of railroad track less than a mile from Caernarvon Castle. Train In Field The royal train had halted in a field about three-quarters of a mile in back of the spot where the bomb exploded just after the queea and other members of the royal family alighted at a spe- cial platform. Crewmen on the royal train said it shoot The explosion came soon after a special train bearing celebri- ties bad passed by on its way to the town. Two youths were arrested within moments of the explosion near the scene but in general confusion it was impossible to tell immediately whether they were directly involved, Meanwhile, In Caernarvon It- self several arrests were made among men booing the royal procession as it passed. One youth was threatened with lynching by the crowd after he the By Claudette Durocher After hearing its alder- manic members voice their concerns over the selection of the Yudicki land for a "super" high school, the joint school building com- mittee has agreed to sub- mit proposed sites to an economic engineering sur- vey. Surrey Plans The survey would be tinder taken by an architectural firm with a report to be submitted to the join! committee. Members of the joint commit- tee voted unanimously last night, after almost two hours of .discussion, to empower its chairman, Dr. Norman W. Crisp, to appoint a committee to interview architects and build- ing consultants for the new school. Once the interviews are com- pleted, the committee will re- port its recommendations to the joint committee which will ac- lually hire the architect and building consultant During the meeting, several aldermen pressed Board of Ed- ucation members to furnish the committee with some type of report presenting facts and fig- ures for its selection of the Yudicli site. Memorandum Sought Alderman Barry L. Cerier made a motion toward the end of the session to require the Board of Education lo submit a memorandum to the joint com- mittee detailing its reasons for choosing the Yudicki site. But Crisp ruled him out of order, saying the joint commit- tee could not legislate for the Board of Education no more than the board could legislate for the Board of Aldermen. A similar point to Cerier's was brought up by Alderman Sherman Horton Jr. who said he would like to "something in writing" to document facts and figures supporting the Yu- dicki site selection. blast was heard throughout the town but many thought, it was part of the Jl-gun salute for Ihe queen. About 50 potice surround- ed the area where the royal par- ty had left the train. Police said the youths were arrested climbing over the railroad guardwall close to the scene of the explosion. A section of (he track was torn up by the force of the ex- plosion. Among the passengers aboard Ihe special train which passed over Ihe track before the bomb went off were U.S. Ambassador Walter Annenberg and Patricia Nixon, daughter of the Ameri- can president. Prince Charles was Installed as Prince of Wales later In a cere- mony overflowing with the pomp of the British monarcy. He promised to protect the her- itage of the Wi million Welsh- men, many of them hostile lo English rule. Queen Elizabeth II, mother to the heir to the an- cient throne of Britain, proudly bestowed on him the coronet, sword, mantle, golden rod and ring that go with his office. The ceremony, first of its kind in 58 years, look place in the courtyard of 700-year-old Caer- navon Castle in a royal pageant right out of Britain's past. Charles appeared for the sol- wilh true British pomp and pre- cision, merely put the stamp on Charles' title, lie has been using it since'the age of 9 when the queen at Cardiff conferred it and told the Welsh people she would present him for investj- ture "when he is grown up." Today Charles was formally accepted. Only chosen nobles and guests were able to squeeze into the castle courtyard, but Brit- ain's television networks cov> ered the entire event. Charles is only the third prince lo be invested in Wales and the first in 5S years. Ed- ward VIII went through the cer- emony in 1S11, and Edward H endured it in 1S01. Others have accepted the title in England. Between and police and detectives from throughout the nation mounted the biggesl security operation ever attempt- ed in Britain for the protection of one person. People with busi- ness in the 13 Ih century castle were searched repeatedly be- fore being allowed inside. Police said the explosion near the railroad tracks in Abergale, miles northeast of Caernar- von, apparently was aimed at blowing up local government bnUdiags, but Ihe incident heightened concern for the prince's safety. A police spokesman said the Iwo men who were tilled "were Scene of Confroversial Ceremony Caernarvon Castle is the scene of today's ceremonies in which Prince Charles (inset) was to be invested as Prince of Wales by his mother, Queen Elizabeth. The train on which the royal family traveling nar- rowly escaped destruction when a bomb exploded just before the train came to it today. A minority group, the Welsh Nationalists, has been con- ducting demonstrations against the Prince. School Officials in Pelham By RICHARD WITHS Hi. Turk Ttmtt Hlwi ttraici NEW YORK-Col Frank Bonnan, who commanded the Apollo 8 flight around the moon, Ht for Moscow last right for i nine-day First visit to Russia by tn American as- tronaut Reliable sources said his itin- erary caned for him !o look in 01 a Russian equivalent of Cape Kennedy. -So far as is known, only Trance's Charles de Gaulle, has previously been TONIGHT IN THE TELEGRAPH Abby Baker CUssiteds J2. J4. Comics Crossword Editorial Fmantial Lawrence 31 Pearson Reston Sodal Sports Nashua Scene 4 Obiraaries J H Suburban g Television ii Theaters S3 Dr. Thosleson 11 Weather Wicker 9 altered a first-hand view of Russian launching facilities. The launching site usually Is Identified by Ihe Russians as Baikonur, 'located about mile southeast of Moscow. It also was reported that Bor- on the trip by his wife Susan and their two inspect, and per- hips fly. Russia's supersonic airliner, the TU-H4. Some space officials suggest- ed that the Russians might be ready la send one or more ob- servers to Cape Kennedy Jury It tt> wzlch the ApoDo 11 crew lake off for what is intended to be the first manned landing on the moon. The Soviet emment has rejected numerous 12 Invitations to Cape Kennedy, apparently because !t was not Inclined to re.'dprccate. There waj speculation too Ihat Ihe Borraan visit might Indicate some Imminent move- merit by the' Russians toward international cooperation in the field of manned Whot's So Special About FREE CHECKING AT NASHUA minimum balance if you're under 65 and NONE if you're over. That's what! Member, FJX1.C. The explosion happened just after the. royal family had alighted from the train for the viewers around the rorld. after spending the night n a secret, heavily guarded location somewhere fn northwest Svales.' Surrounded by noblej of the realm, Welsh leaders, foreign dignitaries and diplomats; Charles knelt In obeisance to his mother. The heir to the throne then pledged: "I, Charles, Prince of Wales, lo become year liege man of ife and limb and earthly worship, and faith and trust I will sear unto you to live and die against all manner of folks." The queen then presented diaries to the people of Wales. The town of Caernarvon with a population of only swelled to a milling throng of a quarter of a million. The vast :rowd waved a sea of Union Facks, ignoring the Welsh nationalists. The ceremony, up. Their bodies were ound behind the local government offices, one can assume hey had gone there lo blow them up." The royal train carrying Charles, Queen Elizabeth and uost of tlit royal family was lilted for 50 minutes while po-ice checked what appeared to M a bomb found under a railroad bridge farther ahead on bt train route. It was dummy. Signal wires and telephone ca-Jles along a stretch of the route xtween Aber and Bangor were cut, but an emergency crew quickly repaired Ihe damage. In Caernarvon, youngsters slept in the streets to be sure of a place near the castle en-rance. Elderly housewives  resented tHs to the people of Pelham (at the School District And the people of Pclham had the impression that he tuition would be the same for all ont-of-Iown pupils attending Alvime." The Board agreed to poslpone any decision until its July 22 meeting, but did not rule out the possibility of calling a special School District meeting next month on the problem. As the matter stands 'at Pelham has exercised a two-year option on the ofd contract, an option which calls for a state average pcr-pupil tuition rate, or about J69i per pupil. This option would be aufomal-cally cancelled upon the sign-Ing of the five-year contract. And Hudson has warned that, should Pelham merely exercise the two-year option, they will not grant any further renewal. At the March School meeting, Hudson voters approved the terms of the contract, and til rne Pact April 2, Pelham residents also approved it after much discussion. It was argued it that time that Pelham had to "buy time" until local borrowing power and number "of students warranted a local high school or until Wind-ham or some other neighboring town was interested in a cooperative venture. At the time of the April J School District meeting, members of the High School Study Committee, who had taken fc 'Unjust' in the negotiations, wholeheartedly favored signing the five-year contract with Hudson. Their reactions to the current impasse wil] be reported in later issues. Also present at last night'i meeting were School Board member Pftlip Currier, who was elected tHs star and thai did not taie part in previous negotiations, and Asst. Superintendent of Schools Peter Dolloff. Asked >ol Site "The first thing. I say, is that the school board was elected by Ihe people to make these decisions and they are none of my Horton remarked. "But if this site selection is a terrible blunder, as I am told it is, then it's my business to see that it's not done." He noted that all he has heard SITE STUDY Page Leg Windup By ADOI.PHE V. BERNOTAS CONCORD. N.1I. (AP) The Vew Hampshire Legislature was In Ihe throes of winding up he 1969 session with the last wrst of activity expected today lut the final adjournment time till uncertain. The House Monday passed a resolution to finish its work at 5 p.m. today. But (he rift causing strained eelings between the House and Senate extended even lo ad-oumment lime Ihe resolu-ion promptly was tabled when t reached the Senate. The maneuver left the way open for the senators to take the resolution from the table and act on it today or lo leave it where it Is and not be bound ij a deadline for adjournment. Animosity between the mem-xrs of the two chambers surfaced during the afternoon 'in debate over a conference com-Jiiltee'i report on Ihe mil-ion capital improvements budget. House Speaker Marshall Cob-leigh, R-Nashua, criticized the senators for sending to the lower chamber provisions which House members already rejected. "They're telling us no mailer liow many times we kill a bill we'll have (o conlinue (o lake it tip." Applauding House members gave Cobleigh a 131-7 vote of confidence and sent to the Senate a resolution warning the senators the House would Delayed accept mailers it previously had killed. The rift erupted over a request that the conference com-mittce studying the budget bi allowed to take up the previous-y killed measures later passed n the Senate as amendments to he budget. "I say we don't negotiate Veville Cobleigh said. "I say we do what'i right." lie said some Senate mem-sers had threatened to kill the budget. He said he wanted to see it passed but added, "it wouldn't be the end of the world." He said it takes building programs at least two years la start and noted that the lawmakers probably will back In January in special session. The Senate then went Into closed session lo decide its next move. It was learned that hour-long session produced an agreement that Ihe conference coir.millc-e today fry to arrive at a compromise. Also lo be ironed out today was the stale employes salary increase authorization bill and several ether measures. Although the House volcd adjourn at 5 p.m., real time means little in the New Hampshire Legislature. In (tie pasl, the lawmaker! have stopped the clock as adjournment lime approached and ground away into Ihe next day. Variety Stay-At-I A varied program for the annual Fourth of July celebration in Nashua was announced today by George Sargent, chairman of the Park-Recreation Commission. All activities for children and will lake place Event lomes 01 day in Holman Stadium. In the] event of rain, the program win carried out on Saturday. The event, designed for stay-at-homes over the holiday, yearly attracts large crowds. For the past several years, more than persons Await i July 4 thronged the stadium for the vening program, climaxed by a fireworks display. Children, ages 6 through It, will have a field day, beginning at 1 p.m., with various game; and contests. Refreshments will be served. The evening program will include: At 6, baseball game between he Junior American Legion earn, representing the James 5. Coffey Post, and the Babe Ruth League All-Stars; At 8, marching and muslca exhibition featuring the Subur-banetles All-Girl Drill Team, and the award-winning Eiks Trojans and Nashua Spartans drum and bugle corps; At dark, fireworks display. The program will Include a )rief address by Mayor Dennis Sullivan, and the presenta-lon of the first Nashua Park-flecreation Deparlmenl Serv-Ice-lo-Youlh award. Officials said the award will be made annually to a person recognlze viet Facility barrier that had kept American astronauts out of the Soviet Union. Answering a news conference question on subject, be said: "I don't krxnr why we aren't going to Russia. 1 would like lo visit Russia." A Soviet cosmonaut, Gherman Titov, his visited this country, but not Cape Kennedy or any other launching center. Bonnan, recently turned 41, and Ms two ApoQo 8 crewmales -Capt. James A. Lovell Jr. and MaJ. Wiffiam A. captured the world's imagination hi December when they became the first men lo orbit the moon and marked the occasion with Christmas eve FRANK BORMAN Borman made some overtures in thU direction when he was in Paris in February on a good will tour of eight west-em European nations. He suggested that the United and Russia pursue separate objectives in space, with a foil ind free exchange of information. He also made known Ml strong desire to break down this year, Bonnan resigned as active Apolfo crewman to become deputy director of flight crew operations. In May, be became field BORMAN Page Instructors. Edwin Schroeder, superintendent o parks, is in charge of stadium preparations. The P-R Commission includes chairman Sargent, Roger Chan-tal, Allan Silber, Wilmur and Richard by Charles Famous Ihruout New F.ngland H7 W. PEARL ST. Fines! in Pizzas Grinders (all varieties) Regular 90c PLAIN PIZZA TUESDAY 7CC ONLY Pu Telephone 88M542 Open 1 1 A.M. (a 2 A.M. Mon. thru Sat. Sunday! 3 P.M. to ELECTRIC JUniNJUIN 0 SUPPLY INC. 209 Morn Street Will Close Wednesday until P.M. Out of respect for the passing of. Everett E. Johnson, Sr, Accounts INVITED WE HONOR BANKAMERICARD UNICARD Nashua Wallpaper Co. W. Pearl St. SH-Wfl Opea Thuri. Night tin and CRAIG TAPE RECORDER CASSETTE and REEL Large Selection BankAmerfcard UnlcarJ FOTOMART CAMERA Corp. MAIN ST. StlT 10 STATE CI5EXA fotoiairt Shop QUARTERLY State Federal TAX RETURNS ARE DUE For Assistance Can FRED ACKLEY   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication