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Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: June 26, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - June 26, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                               Today's Chuckle Yawning may be bad man- ners but at least It's an honest opinion. Celeara Ntw Hampshire's Larftct Evening Ktwspaptr Weather ''Fair- Mild fonigtil Cloudy, Humid Friday Report On foft two VOL. 101 NO. 100 Continuing tht New Hwnpthire Telegrtph Established October M, 18M NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, THURSDAY, JUNE 26. 1969 Second CUtt Postage Piid AtNiihut, N.H. PAGES Prlet TEN CENTS Surtax Vote Due Monday By EDMOND LeBRETON WASHINGTON (AP) Democratic House chiefs have decided to call for a vote on President Iran's surtax extension week or more earlieFthah expected receiving assurances Republican mem- bers have closed ranks behind the plan. Emergency Measure The House will take up Friday an emergency measure to ex- 'tend present 'withholding rates July 31. Otherwise, they Would drop to presurtax rates at midnight Monday when the orig- inal 10 per cent income tax sur- charge expires. Even if the House passes the surtax Monday, the Senate still must act in committee and on the floor, so there is no chance of enactment by the midnight June 30 deadline. House Republican Leader Gerald R. Ford of Michigan said about 170 Republican votes for surtax extension are in sight after Nixon appealed for votes at a Republican conference Wednesday. .This would mean only about 50 of the 245 Democrats would have to vote favorably to pass the measure. Some Republicans suggested, however, that Ford's count may be optimistic. After headcounts showed sub- stantial lack of firm Democratic support, leaders had postponed a vote scheduled for Wednes- day. Ford's report, however, caused them to reconsider plans to let the surtax lie-over until after the July 4 holiday. The surtax issue became linked with legislation on the federal program for aid to de- pendent, children. Rep. Phillip Burton, D-Calif., blocked short cut action on the withholding tension Wednesday, demanding the House move on a lift a freeze on the number of chil- dren who may be included in the program. The freeze, voted more than a year ago, actually never has gone into effect. Congress sus> pended it for a year, which tat pires Monday. The Senate Has voted for outright repeal, bul that bill has not been acted on in the House. Pope Ends Silence On 668 Encyclical By ROBERT C. DOTY Niw York Tiiml Ntw> ROME Pope Paul VI today ended his 11-month silence on his controversial birth control encyclical. He said that much of the opposition to his renewal of the ban on artificial con- traception is based on a desire for the easy life. Not since his original defense of the encyclical "humanae vitae" human de- livered the' week after it -was published on July 29, 1968, Had the pontiff made direct, public reference to the storm of world- wide dissent it set off. Yesterday, at his general au- dience for several thousand pil- grims in St. Peter's Basilica, He conceded that "simple and fundamental spiritual concep- tions" similar to those enunciat- ed by Saint Paul, were desira- ble. But the pontiff distin- guished between simplicity and facility, declaring unacceptable the. attitude that would dissolve the bonds of Christian morality by dismissing them is "taboos" Is Christianity, inade for tem- peraments: weak in human force and 'for the indolent in moral conscience, for. hearted tepid, lie asked. "We ask ourselves also if among the motives of objection raised with respect to the en cyclical inner 'humanae vitae' also of HeW In Slaying of Eight Torres was arrested on a murder charge. At left is Patrolman Casper Carbone arid at right is Patrolman Richard Ford. (AP Wirephoto) Rafael Torres, 40-year-old grocer, is led from the scene in Jersey City after his wife and seven of their nine children were found stabbed to death in the Torres apartment Wednesday. Some Officials Wary Of Site for School By CLAUDETTE DUHOCHER brought iip at the meeting and Selection of the Yudicki the site selection will be brought site for the construction of W for consideration not that I a "super" high school will anythmg' definitely be thrashed out the of Eduction at a meeting of the joint was decicied on the Yudicki site school building committee a iong time ago and that was ap- Monday night, Aldermanic parent, in my opinion, at our joint President Maurice L. Arel meeting with the Planning said today. Board." Board Calls Meeting Jurisdiction Cited The -Board of Education has The Board of Education has called for the meeting to get jurisdiction over the site of a procedures in motion to select school site. an architect for ,'construction of Under the jurisdiction of the joint school building committee, the'new school. But Arel said the board's se- lectiSrt'' of the' Yudicki site for the school has not been gen- erally accepted by the aldermen. T.can't speak for them per- he said, "but only from conversations I've heard about the selection. which is composed of the 12-meni' ber Board of Education arid 12 aldermen, are architect selection and construction expenditures. Dr. Norman W. Crisp, Board of Sducation president, is chairman of the joint committee. The school board picked the IB-acre Yudicki site on the Main Dunstable Road for the new high school at a meeting Friday nigh with three members opposed and one abstention. In its site analysis report pre- sented to the joint committee las week, the Planning Board favora the.Mill Pond site north of Wes Hollis Street arid south of tht rriili canal as a preferred site for the school. The 62-acre site lie immediately west of the turnpike Easthampton Man Is Held In Slaying of 6-Year-Old e took as his theme what is HUI mat UL of them are Mass. (AP) ailed the erroneous thought: To abolish t costs, including Mark LaCount, a blue-eyed ion of the ecumenical law to render life a sewage line and added missing since Sun- Vatican II, as ah invitation But if it is law, costs, associated was found slain during the nake Christianity easy its foundation in God, and a 24-year-old drifter it to be sure the subject will by police as a some- circus worker was No Gains Seen in with murder in the case. Mark's body was discovered in a shallow grave about a quar- from his home shortly For Middle East midnight, police said. It was unclothed, investigators added. By PETER GROSE York THnil Ntwi long-standing Soviet positions supporting those of the to the Russians late last month, there was cause of death was not determined immediate.y but an autopsy was to be undertaken WASHINGTON The on territorial Jnion's latest counter United States officials The United States today. or a peace settlement in the Hiddle East is reported to leave Moscow and Washington that after the latest exchange between Moscow and Washington "there is still a for "secure and recognized frontiers" accepted by the countries involved, was Ernest M. Ar-chambault of Easthampton, who officers said moved here recent- s far apart on central to go" in finding a direct from Florida. ial and political issues as satisfactory formula Russians in their faced arraignment in Nor- vere nearly five months between Israel and made no provision for District Court. vhen the international between Arabs was arrested at naking efforts harshest part of the on any subject. State Hospital, po- Diplomatic analysts, after tudying the detailed terms of he Soviet note handed- to Sec-etary of State William note was said to be a detailed timetable for the withdrawal of Israeli troops from all-trie territories occupied the critical demand. Instead of following the American lead of leaving aside territorial details, the Soviet said, where he was admitted earlier in the week after being treated at CbOley Dicken-son Hospital in Northampton for Rogers last week, found no the 1967 with each of the officers said was an over- lence of any significant the U.S. package of sleeping pills. Knowles Nornination Still in WASHINGTON (AP) The m-again, off-again unofficial mmination of Dr. John H. Snowies as the nation's top lealth officer appears off again oday or does doing little to help matters. A White House spokesman warned newsmen Wednesday against "going out on a limb" in predicting that Knowles would be named for the post that of Welfare Secretary Robert H. Finch and a Finch spokesman said Wednesday night "the name had been sent up to the White House." Knowles, director of the AMA in April, saying the medical association deserves to be heard because of its .broad influence in the health field. A few hours after the word of caution from the White House Differing reports abounded on whether President Nixon had lecided to battle the American dedlcal Association and vacant for nearly six months while a major public test of wills built up between Dirksen and the General Hospital, is Finch's choice to be his assistant secretary for health and scientific affairs. He is news said flatly Nixon had decided against the nomination. It quoted an unnamed senator who had been with Nixon earlier tepublican Leader Everett M. Dirkseri and send the name to he warning was issued even though Nixon told a nationally televised news conference powerful elements in the AMA who feel he is too liberal and too afterward the Washington Post weighed in with a report that the nomination was And the White House that he would abide by publicly sided doubt. by THE FOLLOWING STORES WILL BE thruout New England 147 W. PEARL Federal TAX RETURNS ARE DUE THURSDAY FRIDAY 'TIL 9 in Pizzas Assistance Call FRED ACKLEY Mark, youngest child of Mr and Mrs. Francis LaCount o was last seen Sunday afternoon playing nea his home. He was reporter missing Sunday night, and a intense around-the-clock search involving hundreds of person and. covering acres of land fo. lowed. The grave was unearthed be hind the M L Plastics Co alongside the brush-covere banks of the Manhan River which search parties draggec time and again in their effort to locate the boy. Police declined to sa; immediately how they cam but it wa officers an upon the grave, known that both representatives of the distric attorney's office were present a the tiriie. Northeast Area To Be Appraisec Revaluation crews of the Cole Layer, Trumble appraisal firm mil be moving into the northeas section of Nashua, next weel George A. Dionne, chairman the assessors, said today. He said the crews will be view ing properties in the section lyin east of Main Street between Eas Hollis Street and the Merrimac town line. They are expected t complete their work in this se tion in five to six weeks, Dionn added. Postal Director Named by Bloun WASHINGTON (AP) Ephraim Martin, postmaster i the Boston Postal District, has new job. He was appointed Wednesda postal director for all six Ne England states, under a reo ganization announced by Pos master General Winton M. Bloun Blount created 15 district with a director for each havin broad powers over district ope ations. What's So Special About FREE CHECKING AT NASHUA TRUST? minimum balance if you're under 65 and NONE i'f you're over. That's what! Member, F.D.l.C. Budget Last For Legislature By Adolphe V, Bernotes CONCORD, N. H. (AP) The New Hampshire jegislature moved toward djournment with only a w major items, including million. general und budget, left to clean j today. The last spasm of activity ccurred in the Senate hich stopped its clock at p. m. Wednesday but ontinued until 4 a. m. to- ay, working 17 hours to et everything in under the igal June 25 deadline. Major Items The major items up for action day included the general fund udget, the capital improve- erits budget which the Sen- e increased by nearly mil- on over the million assed in the House and the 5 head tax which the Senate oosted to while lowering the i-year exemption to 66. Also to be fought out today as the Congressional icting measure. The House 'ednesday refused to go along ith' the Senate over a version pproved by the state's Repub :an Congressmen James leveland and Louis Wyman. Democrats charged gerryman ering and 71 House Republi aris voted with them agairisl ic Senate proposal. The mail jjectjon against It was tha eavily Democratic Manchester divided between the- two istricts. The House wasted no time in etting its work done Wedries ay. In one motion, it killed 24 enate bills in its Appropria :ons Committee and recessed' there was talk of retaliation n the Senate to give the sam reatment to the ..remainin House bills in the upper cham er. But the Senate met as ommittee of the whole behim losed doors and later severa enators said they would prefe o take cours f action and grind away at th. sills. The capital improvement judget approved by the Senati idded about million for im irovements at the State Hosp al in Concord arid Lacoriia late School. The upper chamber passed he state's head tax, raising it roni J5 to and lowered the ixemption from 70 to 86 years if age. The head tax was enacted as Senate Riders' On Six Measures CONCORD, NiH. (AP) The New' Hampshire Seriate, work- ng nearly all night, attempted o salvage six of the 24 bills ed by the. House in a single motion Thursday by tacking ;hem to pending legislation as 'riders." The action resulted in sonic rather unusual justifications for adding the provisions of dead rills to measures which still lave a chance at passage. For example, Sen. Howard Townsend, R-Lebanon; attached a timber tax bill to a "truth in packaging" bill which sets up uniform weights and measur.es. He explained that cutting tiiri- >er involves board feet arid cords of wood in other words, measurements. In other action, a bill setting up a commission on educational architecture was added to a compulsory school attendance measure; an appropria tion for a new educational tele- vision antenna was tacked onto the capital appropriations bill, and a bill calling for construc- tion of an alumni house arid mu- seum without cost to the state was added to a bill creating a committee of hbri-academic em- ployes .at the University of New Hampshire.. Probably the rribst "amus.ini issue was speculation'that'Sen Laiirier Lamontagne, D-Berlin, would try to add his Pohtook River Dam bill to a measure granting toll-free passage for funeral processions on toll roads. "What do you.mean it isn't asked Lamontasne jokingly. "The bill's dead, isn't a temporary levy in 1951 and has been re-enacted ever since. Ah attempt to double It to arid to have 18-year-olds pay it was defeated by two votes. A measure designed to set iip centralized data processing'; in the state was sent by the Sen- ate to the Citizens Task Force. The measure carried no 'ap- propriation. However, a power struggle over the Centralized Data Processing Commission and several .other, state, agencies has developed.in recent weeks. The House earlier approved he which; generally would put the data agency in iharge. of all computer opera- ions' in the Departments which have their own computers, have resisted. The measure will now have lo go back to the House.. Among the maior 'business completed by the Seriate was a bill for more than million jvirig the state employes a sal- ary increase effective immedi- ately. The measure no'w. must [0 back to the House for ap- proval of minor amendments. The upper chamber also ap- proved, the. governor's proposal :o establish aerogram'for drug abuse Control In. the Public health Department as: an ad- turict of the state's, alcoholism jrogram: The bill has. an ap- jropriation of .A bill' which Authorizes the state to issue bonds; up; to million for .water-pollution, con- trol was passed by the Seriate and sent to the gdverridr for, his signature.' The current Bonding .for water pollution is million. Scholarship Program The smaller chamber ap- proved a scholarship program -for nurses but 'Wiled another nurses scholarship; appropriation for a feasibility study state uni- versity branch in Manchester has been passed arid sent to Gov- Walter Peterson. The Senate killed a program for town road aid but passed a measure' which lets town road aid funds to be used for resurfacing of roads instead LEGISLATURE Fiji 1 Nashua Father, Daughter Ready for Royal Wedding By MARSHA CLEMENT A Nashua father and daughter will take part in a royal wedding n Boston Saturday. Roland Kohl, )f 74 New Searles Road, and his ittle daughter, Michelle, 5, will je members of the wedding party when Miss Mary Godfrey folk of Boston becomes the bride jf Count Otto Praschma, Baron of Bilkati, of Hothenstein, Hottweil, iermany. Kohl, who is a, supervisor at Hampshire Chemical Co., will erve the count as an usher, and little Miss Kohl will attend the new countess as a flowergirl. Count Praschma and his bride- o-be visited Nashua last week- end as guests of the Kohls. Mrs. Kohl and Miss Volk are also lorig- ime friends, since they were once neighbors in Oxford, Ohio. Miss Volk is the daughter of Mrs Louis F. Volk of Boston and he late Capt. Volk, U.S.N. She is a graduate of Miami Uni- versity in Oxford, Ohio, and studied for a year at the Universi- y of Chicago as an honorary Woodrow Wilson fellow. She then went to Mainz, Germany, where she received a master's degree from Middlebury College's Gradu; ate School of Germar Count Praschma, who is now lawyer, is the son of Countess Sophie Praschma of Rottwell (the former Baroness von Dalwigk zu Uchtenfels) and the late Count Friedrich Praschma. He studied n Bordeaux, France, and Mun- ich, Germany, before receiving i law degree from the University of Saar. He holds a master's de- gree in comparative law from the University of Chicago. Charge Accounts INVITED WE HONOR BANKAMERICARD UNICARD Nashua Wallpaper Co. W. Pearl St. Open Thun. i'iu Nlfhti 'Tit Royal Flower Girl Michelle Kohl, five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roland Kohl of Nashua will be the flower girl at a royal wedding in Boston Saturday when Mary Godfrey Volk of Boston becomes the bride of Count Otto Pra- schma of Germany. Michelle's father, Roland Kohl will serve as an usher. The wedding will take place at an nuptial mass in Mem- orial Church of Harvard Uni- versity. The Bcv. Joseph Collins, Columbia Pictures THE FINEST IN HOME MOVIES Featuring 8mm and Super 8mm Large Selection FOTOMARt CAMERA Corp. 178 MAIN ST. MBIT TO STATE CINEMA, Fotbiniirt." Shop Fotomtrt" pastor of St. Paul's Church, Cambridge! will officiate. A reception will follow in the garden and library of the Harvard Faculty Club. TONIG THE TEL Abby 7 Baker 16 Classifieds 22, JJ.M, M Comics 11 Crossword 22 Editorial 4 Financial Horoscope 21 Scene IN EGRAPH Obituaries 2 Pearson 4 Reston 4 Sports 18, Suburban 14, IS Television 21 Theaters B Dr. Thoiteton IS 1   

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