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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - May 26, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                               Today's Chuckle Rule for a happy marriage: "If your wife isn't talking to interrupt." TW lOOtfi Ytor Ai A Doily C. J Weather Frost -f Sunny, Wormar FULL REPORT ON PAfll TWO VOL. 101 NO. 73 Established >i a Weekly October X, Incorporitw u i March 1. NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, MONDAY, MAY 26, 1969 Second Cisss Postage Paid At Naihua, N. H. 30 PAGES Prlct TEN CENTS Astronauts Land Safely ii, After Historic Flight U.S. Space Trio Gets Big Welcome The diagram at left illustrates the Apollo 10 space capsule coming into earth's atmosphere through, the reentry corridor and splashing .down in: the Pacific. Making the-Historic flight, which set. the stage for a lunar Through fhe Reenfry Corridor to Splashdown landing in July thiee astronauts (right left to right Navy Cmdrs. Eugene A. Cernan and John W. Young arid Air Force Col. Thomas P.-Stafford.-; (AP Wirephotos) By HOWARD BENEDICT SPACE CENTER, Houston Apollo 10 spacecraft, returning triumphantly from a trip to moon, splashed down in the Pacific Ocean in good shape today. "We are m great radioed one of the astro- nauts. The spacecraft was sighted almost immediately as it came through a light cloud -cover and helicopters were overhead. Splashdown was three miles from the prime recovery ship Message Of Hope As they appioached the world they had left eight days before, An Force Col Thomas P Staf- fold and Navy Capts John W Young and Eugene A Ceinan, beamed down a-television mes- sage of hope. "How' much we're :going to pi ogress m the future is left to your Stafford "but if we harness our en- eigies and keep our perspec- tives right, the goals are unlim- A beacon could be seen flash- ing as the spacecraft swayed gently to the surface "We should be right on top of >ou if jou're down Staf- ford said "We are in great shape the time the space- craft still was in the air; U, S. -Launcher New Vietnam Offensive By GEORGE ESPER SAIGON (AP) The -U.S. Command .today .an- nounced two new .Ameri- can offensives in South Vietnam's; northernmost- provinces and said they were aimed at "capturing or destroying enemy forces, material- and installations." two Drives The two new drives .have ac- counted for 142 North Viet- namese soldiers killed since they began, one-18 days ago, the other 11 days ago, U.S: Head- vquarters said. "casualties were put at 28 killed and 134 wounded. The command said announce- ment of the operations were withheld for security reasons. One of the offensives, Opera- tion Lamar Plain, was launched May 16 by.hundreds of para- troopers fr.om the U.S. 101st Air- borne Division in jungled foot- hills 45 miles south of Da Nang. It is aimed at taking pressure off the important provincial capital of Tarn Ky, around which there has been heavy fighting in recent weeks. The U.S. Command said 113 North Vietnamese and 26 paratroopers have been killed, and 102 para- troopers wounded. In the second drive, about U.S. Marines from the 3rd Division are checking an area north-northeast of the aban- doned combat base of Khe Sanh shout 18 miles east of the Lao- tian border arid 10 miles below the Demilitarized Zone. Dubbed Operation Herkimer Mountain, It has produced lit- tle significant results since it was''launched May .9. '.The "U.S. Command reported 29 North Vietnamese killed and said U.S. casualties Have been" two killed and 32 wounded. f hi. U.S: Command also're- ported 26 enemy. rocket and Sunday night mil said'.'bnly 10 caused casual- ties or. damage and-these were light! 'The Command also re-, ported- two more American heli- copters shot with seven Am.eri c-a-ns .wounded. .-The raised to the number of American helicopters reported lost in the war'." Allied sources reported today that casualties in the war1 last week included ahout 300 Ameri- cans, 413 South. Vietnamese and of the enemy, according to preliminary reports. As the controversy in the United States over American casualties continued, the U.S. Command in Saigon announced that more than 40 of the enemy were killed for every allied sol- dier during a 24-hour period of the weekend. But battlefield re- ports gave a ratio Saturday and Sunday of 24 to one, with 436 Viet Cong and .North Viet- namese, 12 Americans and six South Vietnamese killed. Anoth- er 105 Americans and 16 South Vietnamese were wounded. The kill ratio for the casual- ties reported for last week was nearly 6 enemy to 1 allied sol- dier. This was somewhat less than the ratio of 7 or 8 to 1 that has prevailed in recent weeks, but the figures made available today are incomplete and may revised by the time the week- ly summary is issued Thursday.' Casualties have' soared since" May 11, when the Communist command' stepped iip its attacks across South Vietnam. The-U.S; Command blames' the' higher casualties on increased enemy a spokesman for.Gen. Creighton W. Abrams said two days ago that1 U.S. forces have not increased the level of their offensive activity but are contin- uing to operate-In the same manner, they have for many months. "A'cardirial principle.of U.S. Baitlefielti Tactics i Supported by By FBED S. HOFFMAN WASHINGTON (AF) Secre- tary of Defense Melvin R. Laird has spoken out in battlefield .tactics -in Viet-. nam, which Democratic critics say cause, needless loss of. American lives. "Ills always been our goal to keen the maximum pressure on the enemy consistent with- the lowest -possible Laird said Sunday, adding that U.S. commanders continue.un- der instructions to carry out this policy. Laird, a Republican congress- man from Wisconsin before President.'Nixon appointed him defense chief, outlined, his view in an interview before he board-' ed his airplane for a week-long North Atlantic .-Treaty Organiza- tion planning conference in Brussels and'London. Battlefield tactics have come under mounting criticism from1 Democratic leaders since the 10-day battle in which GIs drove North Vietnamese off Dong Ap Bia Mountain in 11 assaults that cost some 50.American lives. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D- Mass., .called the battle "sense- less and irresponsible" in a Sen- ate speech last week and his stand was supported over the weekend 'by Senate Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield and Sen. George S. McGovern, D-S.D. Mansfield said Sunday the United States is jeopardizing progress in the Paris peace talks by escalating the war through expanded military pres- sure creating an "act-react syn- "What we ought to do is not so much to apply presure in Viet- nam as to instead apply pres- sure in the Montana senator said. "That is where peace is going to be made, not on the battlefield." Mansfield made the comment on CBS' "Face the Nation." McGovern praised Kennedy Saturday for speaking out' "in protest against a truly senseless BATTLEFIELD Page I military operation is to accom- plish the mission with'minimum the spokesman said; Meanwhile, the National Lib- eration Front broadcast an an- nouncement that Viet Cong forces will observe a 48-hour cease-fire in honor of Buddha's birthday on May 30: The Saigon government announced nearly three weeks ago that allied forces would halt offensive oper- ations for 24 hours, from 6 a.m. Saigon time May 30 to 6 a.m. May 31. The NLF said its cease file would stait 23 hours earlier, at 7 a.m. May 29, and continue until 7 a.m. May 31. There was no immediate com- ment from the South Viet- namese government on the Viet Cong's announcement, but it was not expected to extend its cease-fire period to conform to the enemy's. On the political front, Presi- deno Nguyen Van Thieu un- veiled a new alliance of six po- litical parties supporting him and invited other groups lo join the coalition if they oppose communism. "Those who .fight communism but do not agree with us on some poinls, may (hose.bodies form into an opposition, an op- position that will show respect for [he constitution.and for Ihe people's Thieu told a meeting of .delegates and spectators Sunday at a heavily guarded rally in a Saigon movie house. The alliance is named the Na- tional Social Democratic .Front. Vietnam's anti-Communists traditionally have been split into a large number of political par- ties or factions, leaving the Communists the largest-and most effective organized politi- cal force in the country. Thieu said in' a speech-April 7 -that a well organized is necessary if the. anti-Commu- nists are to survive. Three Accidental Deaths in N.H. During Weekend By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Accidents claimed three lives over the. weekend in New Hampshire. The body of Bruce Masters, 7, of Pittsburg, was recovered from the Connecticut River Sun- day nigbl. Authorities said he fell into the river earlier in the day while playing with his brother and a friend. In Marlboro, Lindsey Thrash- er, 17, of Keene, died Friday night when the car lie was driv- ing flipped over on Route 101. In Tilton, Burl Smith, 64, was killed Saturday when the lawn- mower lie was driving caught a clothesline and pulled out a post which fell on him. The traffic death brought the state's highway fatality toll for the year lo 58. ited The first light of dawn was coming up ovei the Pacific as Apollo 10 enteied its blackout Atmospheric entry to splash- down was to take about 14 min- utes. "We have a first repoit that Samoa rescue one aircraft has visual mission control announced as the spaced aft came out of the blackout A second aircraft spotted the ship Howver, mission control said later that the an craft had radio visual Television cameras picked up the spaceuafl "We're gonna be there short- Stafford announced jubi- lantly The USS Princeton, a helicop- ter carrier, was-the main recov- ery vessel It was steaming near the splashdown point, 399 miles east of Pago Pago in the Samoan Islands. Because of the dawning light it was impossible to see the three giant parachutes that slowly lowered the spacecraft into the wafer. Soon be seen rising 130 feet above the spacecraft and the sailors on the Princeton cheered. The sea was smooth with waves of- 3 to 4 feet, the sky was partlj' cloiidy and temperatures were in the high 80s. The 11 m.p.h. breeze, was barely enough to ruffle the Princeton's flags "The lookout aboard the Princeton reports they are sighting the spacecraft on para- said mission control. It was still 25 minutes to sunrise. The prime recovery vessel re- ported it heard a sonic boom from -the rapidly descending spacecraft.. ABOARD USS PRINCETON (AP) Climaxing a voyage of discovery, the Apollo 10 moon explorers came safely from the heavens Monday, blaz- ing back through earth's atmos- phere to a bull's eye landing in the South Pacific within sight of the lecovery ship Princeton America's newest heroes ended man's greatest and most dangerous space ad- venture when their sturdy six- ton spaceship parachuted into gently rolling seas about miles from the Princeton Air Force Col Thomas P! Stafford and Navy Cmdrs John W Young and Eugene A Cer1 nan landed at 12 52 p m EDT. The touchdown was about 400 miles east of Pago Pago, just at dawn in this part of the world As the. craft .descended, its tracking lights blinked in the semidarkness The pinpoint landing was I fit- ting thmax to the near-flawless eight dav flight, a final dress re- hearsal which cleared the way foi two astronauts to walk on the moon In less than two months. Stafford, Young and Cernan did not expect.to stay ;overnight on the carrier., as did earlier Apollo teams. After'medical ex- amination; 'shower, and food, they planned to fly by helicopter to. Samoa, where'they would transfer to a jet transport for tup to Ellington Air Force Base neai Houston's Manned Space- craft Center'and a reunion with' their families. A-'long'delay in pickup could cause the flight to Samoa to be delayed to Tues- day. Good Humor Young and Gernan were in good humor and eager to get home as their sturdy spaceship neared: the end. of .its return trip from the. moon. Sunday they aimed, their color APOLLO 19 Page J Douglas Says Probe Is 'Manufactured Case' Two Nashua Men Held in Market Holdup I By BARNARD L. COLLIER New York Times Nowa Servlei LOS ANGELES Supreme Court Justice William 0. Doug- las has privately characterized Internal Revenue Service inves- tigation-of the Albert Parvih Foundation as a "manufactured case" intended to force, him to, leave the bench. The characterization was in- cluded-in a letter dated May U, to Albert Parvin, the multimil- lionaire Los Angeles business executive whose profits from the sale.of the Flamingo, Hotel in Las Vegas provided the ini- tial capital for the foundation. "The strategy is to get me off Die Douglas wrote. "I do not propose, to betid to .any ruch pressure." When Douglas, who.could not be reached for comment, wrote the letter, he was still president and a director of the Founda- tion and was earning a annual salary from the job. According lo Foundation rec- ords here, lie used Ihe salary primarily for travel expenses in-' connection with Foundation business. Douglas' was an- nounced Friday in a statement released by the Foundation. The.statement said that Doug- las had indicated to other Foun- dation directors more, than a month ago that e x p-a h ding Foundation' activities posed "too heavy a work load" for him and that his health was also i matter of concern fol- lowing an operation for appen- dicitis, In 'Washington, Douglas, in- formed that his letter released in California, made no comment. A spokesman for the Revenue Service rejected the suggestion, that any of the agency's inquir- ies could be motivated .by per- sonal or political considera- tions. in the files on Foiirtdation.'-business .main- tained by- was for nearly seven years the Foun- dation's Finance Committee .chairman land' direc- tor 'showed that Douglas on May 1 .advised the .Foundation's board; that he wanted to give up his posls after, nine- years., It was in a file with that ;me- morandum and numerous other letters and records pertaining to Foundation business that Douglas' letter, of May-12 dis- cussing the federal tax investi- gations .appeared.: The issue of Douglas' connec- tion with the Parvin Foundation was raised.-recently because of the controversy surrounding'the 11 resignation from Ithe. Supreme' Court of Justice- Abe Fo'rtas, who-had been offered a a-year fee by (he Wolfson Fam- ily-Foundation. 1 Parvin says lhat'he hasJenown' Louis E. Wolfson for many years. Parvin was named a co- conspirator but was never a slock .fraud'case involving Woifson, whi 'is now. in prison for violations securities law. Despite the prestige rof some of the board members of Par-! vin's Foundation, critics still point out that the. Parvin Foun- dation was started..' with the million-in profis Par- vin gained when he sold the- Flamingo Hotel and gambling Casino in Las Vegas 10 years ago. Parvin made many of his Foundation records, which in- cluded Douglas' .letter, availa- ble- to- the New York Times to show he asserted, that "nothing the Foundation has done is in any .way :wrong." Also contained in Parvin's files is a packet of documents pertaining to; the Internal Reve- nue Service investigation of the tax-exempt status '-of "the Foun- daion. Tlie which Parvin's lawyers advised him he could 'not release for publication, in- cluded a series.of allegations by Held agent questioning moi-e ihah 'a' dozen transactions; involving Parvin's investment :of Foundation funds. a-eopy of the alle- gations were answering letters and documents prepared by Parvin and. lawyers for the Foundation, -including Carolyn the wife of.Abe Fortas, who .recently resigned from the Supreme Court. By JOHN HARRIGAN Two Nashua men were held over for a Superior Court appear- ance in September after being arraigned" in Nashua District Court this morning on charges of armed robbery. Judge Antoine A. Guertin presided. Perley S. Miller, 48, of 100 Main Street and Charles A. Cor- nellier, 29, of 19. Cottage St., waived probable cause hearing and were bound over without bail. The court: appearance stemmed from a cash.theft last night at Soucy's Market, 147 Lake St. In that robbery, two men, one of them armed with a .38 "snub- nosed" revolver, forced a store employe to hand over in cash and checks. Police said (he employe, James .T. Marcclla II, 22, of 558 West Hollis Ihe police sta- tion at p.m. to report lhat he had just-been-robbed. Authorities immediately put out an all-points bulletin and set up roadblocks at key points. Meanwhile, police had received a call about a stolen car. Albert ,7. Millard, of Pompanp, Fla., and Lawrence, .Mass., said his 1961 sedan had been stolen from 'an Elm Street parking lot, Police said Ihe description of the slolen car- matched that of Ihe vehicle Scene of Sunday Holdup Soucy's Market, at 147 Lake St., was the target of an armed'robbery last night in which more than in cash and checks was taken. Two Nashua men appeared in Nashua District Court this morning in connection with the theft. (Telegraphoto-Harrigan) POLAROID COLOR -PAK..II, CAMERA NOW IN STOCK Reg. 29.95 Special FOTOMART CAMERA Com. 178 MAIN ST. TO STATE CINEMA rotoimart Shop CALIFORNIA HOUSE PAINTV SALE Nashua Wallpaper Co. IN W. Si! 882-MU Opea- Trt. Xiiliti '111.' WANT TO SPEAK-MORE EFFECTIVED Seasoned Professor-with Master's Degree in the Communication Arts will offer semi-private in- struction evenings .in speech. For further details call 424-3597 after6 .RMM What's S6 Special About FREE CHECKING AT NASHUA TRUST? minimum balance if you're under 65 and NONE if.you're over.. That's what! Member, F.D.l.C, used in the holdup, and that the car was later recovered in the west end of the city. Store Phone Ripped Out Police said that Marcclla called :from a nearby building. The two thieves had reportedly ripped the store phone from the wall be- fore they fled the scene. Tax Problems? Bookkeeping and Accounting Services Fred Aeklty 883-3912 According to 'authorities; the two suspects were apprehended at gunpoint in a motel on the South Daniel Webster Highway at about p.m. Marcella was reportedly alone in the usually busy store when the theft occurred, The market is one of four Soucy. establishments in the .city. Police Chief PaulTracy praised one of .his officers, Kenneth'Bry- son, (or his assistance in quick arrest of, the' suspects. Tracy -said Officer ;Bryson .ob- tained valuable informaUon-jbout the location of tht two TONIGHT. IN- THE TELEGRAPH Abby 1 ,4 26, 17, 28, 14, ii Comics Cook 11, U Crossword 4 KditorUI IS Financltl M Mil Boyll Thottwn It Uwrmce t   

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