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Nashua Telegraph: Saturday, May 17, 1969 - Page 1

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - May 17, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                               Today's Chuckle The nicest thing about an egotist: He never eoes around talking about other people. IMt Tfce Tffbfraph'i YMT At A Dolly Newspaper.... C_J raph 1 Weather Cloudy Toniflht Chance of Rain Sunday PULL RIFORT ON PAM TWO VOL. 101 NO. 66 EiUUUwd ii t October Ittt u Daily llirek 1.1W NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, SATURDAY, MAY Cliu PHI At Nlihua, N. H. 18 PAGES Met TEN CENTS Apollo Crew Set For Flight Sunday Nashua Girl Selected Gatherine Zanichkowsky, 18, of Nashua was chosen as Miss New Hampshire last night at the annual pageant, held in the Practical Arts Auditorium, Manchester. She wall iepreserit the state in the 1969 Miss America pageant next September in Atlantic City, N.J. She is the daughter of Mr and Mrs Martin Zanichkowsky of 22 Swart Terrace, and is employed as a secretary for the Improved Machinery Inc State Seeking gmg Law By CARL C; CRAFT .CONCORD, N.H. (AP) Backers feel enactment of a New Hampshire wiretapping and eavesdropping law with built-in safeguards to avoid abuse of the authority aill help solve major crimes and help combat the organized un- derworld. They also believe the bill passed by the House. Thursday and sent to the Senate will .effectively protect, the right of personal privacy because it out- law's unauthorized bugging. Drawing a line between what the-authorities are empowered to do and what the general public is blocked from doing, the measure is aimed at in- creasing the war on crime. Approve Plan New Hampshire's Judicial Council reviewed and approved the measure sponsored by Rep. Daniel Healy, D-Manchesier. the council said its provisions "represent an equitable balance between the interest of society in an effective law enforcement capability and the interest of the individual in protection from unreasonable searches and seiz- ures upon the part of the gov- ernment." the only way to tap a' con- versation would be lo get an or- der from a Superior Court judge. The judge could grant sach an order only on a written petition from the state's attor- nej general, deputy 'attorney general or a county attornej The petitionei would have to show that the information con- cerns a major case.such as one involving organized crime and specific offenses such as gam- bling, kidnaping, extortion, brib- er) homicide prostitution and dangerous drugs. The time limit ori the legal wiretap under the court's ap- proval would be up .to 10 days. Any person intercepting or 'di- vulging a wire dr oral commu- nication obtained illegally tinder the proposal would be subject to' criminal prosecution. A person who is not a law en- forcement officer may neither apply for nor receive a "court ordered authority for wiretap- pins and electronic surveillance. I! the 10-day time limit is not sufficient, the judge, may grant g 10-day time extension only if the application for the addition- al time meets the requirements for an original order. And, unless otherwise ordered by the judge, an interception, of the communication sought will end the authorization .for the surveillance. A fine of' up lo a jail term of up to five years, or both, would be the penalty for those convicted of illegal wire- lapping and eavesdropping as defined by the law including. gaining information in business or commercial establishments. Parade at 3 Will Highligfa State Jaycees' Convention A three-division parade, a highlight of the state Jaycees convention, will get under way on.Main Street this afternoon at 3.' tonight, the convention din- ner will be held in the Thun- derbird 88 Restaurant, and will feature an address by Dr, Rob- ert-1'A? Frosch, assistant secre- tary. the Navy. Tomorrow, officers will beiejected. p a'-r a will start from the Simoneau Plaza where the'.'participants will assemble. line of march: north on Main Street, to.Canal Street, to thf south parking lot of Sanders Associates, Inc. .Participants include: First' Division-Hwlice coliar-guard, Veterans eign Wars' Post; Suburbahettes Drum Corps; Pauline Daoiist's baton' twirlers> Concord': Chap- 'ter; Portsmouth Chapter and float; and float; Valley 'Chapter and float, and'Dover Chapter and'.float. I, Second Elks- Tro- jans; h'a.p't'e r Hampton Nashua lice Department float; Nashua Chapter an'd'float; NashuaTEire Department Keene Chap- ter, and Rochester Chapter-and Third 'Division .-.Spartans Drum Corps; PembyokefCh'ap-, ter; .Exeter Chapter arid Berlm-Gorham" Chapter; Hampshire Hospital r Claremont Chapter; Newport Chapter, and American Red Cross COLUMBIA PICTURES FINEST IN HOME MOVIES Featuring'.'..'. 8mm and Super Large Selection fOTOMART CAMERA Cni-lt' 178 MAIN'ST. .l.NIXT TO 8WTB 'OUfElM "It. HOUSE PAINT IN PROGRESS Nashua Walipaper Go. IJf W., Pearl St. aW-Mli; OPBN Thuri. t Frt. 'til B; HOWARD BENEDICT CAPE KENNEDY, Fit. Eager to (tart their voy- age of discovery, the Apollo 10 relaxed today U the launch crew pre- pared the rocket and space- ship to transport them a quarter million miles to or- bit the moon. Tht three veteran space- men, Thomas P. Stafford, John W. Young and Eugene A. Cernan, are to nde into space at 12 49 p m. EOT Sunday on the power of a 36 story tall Saturn 5 rocket. Concern Rlset There was conceri) for several hours Friday night and early to- day that the flight might have to be postponed because of a sus- pected leak in the spaceship's fuel system But the troubleshooting teams traced the problem to a electrical connection. It wai tightened and countdown continued astronauts to fly a pathfinder mission intended to clear the way for two Apollo 11 astronauts to land on the moon In July 4pollo 10" explained Com- mander Stafford, "is designed to tie together all the knots to try to sort out all the unknowns and pave the way for a lunar do everything exact- ly as.on the landing mission ex- cept the final descent to the lu- nar surface." The tno planned to spend dav in the crew quarters five miles from the launch pad, re- viewing the complex flight plan and keeping track of the count- down. They will have dinner at T p m tonight in the quarter! with Vice President !Spird T. Ag. new and Dr. 'Thomas 0. Paine; administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- tration Agnew is chairman of the National Aeronautics and Space Council, which advises the President on spare matters Mrs Agnew planned dinner at nearby Patnck Air Force Base with Barbara Cernan, the only astronaut wife'here to view the blastoff. Faye Stafford and Bar- bara Young will watch on'televi- sion- at their homes near Manned Spacecraft Center, 'Houston. Tex. 10' mission director George Hage 'Friday gave the go-ahead for the final count- down after .reviewing the status of the astronauts, ,'the, Saturn 5, recovery forces, launch .operations and 'weather. Dr. 'Charles Berry, the astro- nauts' chief physician, said spacemen had ho signs of illness and" appear to be well In Good Shape Donald K. Slayton, an astro- naut who-is director of-flight THOMAS P. STAFFORD crew operations, reported Staf- ford, Young and Cernan are "in good shape and ready to go For.three days, the astronauts are .to soar outwards across trackless space, zeroing in on their distant target, miles away. As they zip behind JOHN w. YOUNG the moon's-backside, they'll fire .themselves, into an 'orbit 69 miles above the surface. Halfway through their 2W day orbit of the moon, Stafford and1 Cernan are to transfer to-a hi- tlar module, or LEMi tacked .to the command ship nose. They'll EUGENE A. CERNAN detach the spideiy vehicle and execute a series of maneuvers that twice will take them miles above the site where Apol- lo U astronauts Neil A Arm- strong and Edwin E Aldnn hope to land July 20 That s a relatively flat area IB Crucial Maneuver A crucial maneuver in the Apollo on its power to feet. Astro- 10 mission, shown in NASA artist's naut Jonn Young will remain in the sketch, will come when the Lunar Mod- Command Capsule in a ule, with astronauts Thomas Staffoid orbit, ready to swoop down to the Land- and Eugene Cernan aboard, detaches ing Module's rescue if necessary from the Command Module and descends State Asks TT ri i TJ New Bids U.h. Fishing Boat for Bridge Seized Off Peru New bids for the construction of. the. Nashua-Hudson bridge will be opened June 5 in Con- cord. Proposals. for the bridge sub- structure 'were opened but shelved because .they'ex- estimates by 80 per cent. In seeking new bids, .the state Department of Public Works and Highways combined sub- structure and superstructure work to provide a more at- tractive construction. package competitive.bidding.. The three-pier lo be -built' about.200 feet to the north of the' Falls Bridgt, will be 5W feet long. Completion is scheduled for 'Sept. IS, 1J7K. :-TONIGHT IN THE-TELEGRAPH Abby_______ Church J .Classifieds 13'to 17 H-ll Editorial ....4 Financial i Lawrence 4 Obituaries I Pearson... Social Sports Teen Television Theaters j. Dr. Thmteton U Women's 10 .3 13 a By JOE McGOWAN LIMA (AP) Peru seized its third U.S. fishing boat this year, but released it Friday .after the. captain paid in fees and fines. The. incident put further strain on the two countries already damaged by appropriation of U.S.-owned oil properties :Iast October. U.S. Embassy sources in Lima said the tuna clipper Western King, owned by Peter Pan Caribe, Inc., of Seattle, Wash., was captured by a Peru- vian, torpedo boat 25 miles off the coast- and: taken 'to the port of Talera, northwest of Lima. .Boarded A'communigue from the'Peru- 'yia'n'.iN'ivalV'Ministty-.saliJ the Western "fishing ille- gally. -miles .offshore.'.' It said.1'Peruvian' sailors--boarded the U.S. ship; and took her to Talera. -P -The" Nick.'Tiu- rtgisttii a fishing li- cense and about J10.000 in other fines' 'and' said ;hit planned to Peruvian torpedo boats cap- tured mother tuna boats What's So About FREE CHECKING AT NASHUA TRUST? minimum balance if you're under 65 and NONE if you're oyer. That's what! .March 19 and Feb. 14. They also fired oh a' fourth' U.SJ boat in February but it got away. The basis for such seizures is Peruvian .claim, that her juris- diction in the rich fishing waters extends 200 miles offshore. The capture of the Western King came a few hours after and Peruvian' officials in Washington concluded talks on the fishing rights dispute and .Peru's expropriation of Interria- tional Petroleum Co., a subsidi- ary of Standard-Oil-of-New Jer- sey'.-. It was also learned--in Wash- ington that the United States has suspended military aid to Peru because of the earlier sei- zures. Military aid1 has' run about a .'year. U.S.'officials said the :mililary aid-was, cut off several .weeks, ago without announcement-so as not; to t jeopardize .talks. .between the two governments..''" '.V talks have been going on since last month. Under -U.S. law, ertyVis .in a halting of all foreign aid in six months. The six-month ..period, for the oil and Nix- on dispatched! John Irwih, a Wall .Street lawyer; to begin; ne- gotiations. It was decided to ex- tend the deadline until August pending further negotiations in Washington. Weekend Edition Stock Lists Teen-Age Page Extra Comics Tax Problems? Bookkeeping and Accounting' Fred Ackley 883-3912 N.H. Highway Deaths at 53 H (AP) Richard Carey, 38, of Reads- field, Maine, was" killed today when his car ran off Interstate 83, State Police reported The vehicle rolled over_'and he fell out of it He died i crushed chest and puifctaed lung, State Police said Ctny.wH alone in the car, they added His death was the 53rd .of year' from traffic accident's in New Hampshire. Watertown Man Named Director BOSTON (AP) Richard E. 31, of'Wa'tertdwn, is to take up his new duties .u executive director of the Repub- lican state Committee next Monday. The slate committee approved his appointment" to the i year job as its last mefetlng. Mastrangelo is to resign his post us an assistant attorney gtttn- tht Sea of Tranquillity tht enter Moltke. Then, duplicating maneuveri moon-landing astronauts mtut make in leaving the moon, they'll fly a tricky rendezvous to rejoin Young In the command After another day of photo- graphing potential landing spots learning how to navigate the moon, they'll start the M-hour homeward trip To- tal flight time is eight days, five minutes. New TV Camera When the Apollo Id' astro- naut; turn on their newest tele- vision camera and transmit to earth next week, you probably will notice one improvement more significant than the fact the picture is in color for the first time from space. More notable will be their na- tural human movements With the new camera, developed by Westmghouse for military proj- ects and adapted to Apollo 10 in less than three months, those jerky motions from previous flights are replaced by normal action The new camera transmits at the 525 scan lines that appeal on home television screens, while the flickering action on the cam- era used previously resulted from its transmission at only 100 scan lines. As for color, inside pictures may be a disappointment Vir- tually even thing in the space- craft is a bland gray Stanley Lebar, Westmghouse program maniger for Apollo, cameras, said in checking for colored objects to photograph in the spacecraft, a crew came up with a short list the Apollo II cloth patches tnd American flags on the uni- forms, the red cross on the first aid kit and the flesh tones of the astronauts' faces "But the view everyone li looking forward to is the earth In Lebar said There will be a delay of IB leconds from the time the pic- ture is received m the space center at Houston until it is sent out In this time, the red, green and blue sequence signals from the color wheel camera will be synchronized through two video tape lecordeis. It wouldn't be necessary to do this for home color TV sets, said the camera's developer, Larkin Niemyer, but it is done so that TV networks and stations can videotape U and play it back lat- er. The color camera the astro- naut: will use in the command module weighs 13 pounds They also will have a three-pound monitor which they can attach to the camera or to the metal spacecraft or hold in one hand. Another new camera feature is a zoom lens that can, with a twist of the astronaut's wrist, increase the size of an object nine times. Teri color transmissions from (pace are scheduled Enemy Action Is Anticipated By GEORGE ESPER SAIGON (AP) Field com- manders across South Vietnam alerted their troops to expect "Stepped up 'enemy action thil marking the 79th birth- day of President Ho Chi Minh of North Vietnam Monday. On Ho's birthday last sear, Viet Cong gunners lobbed more than JO rockets into the Sal- ion, killing 11 persons. Military .sources disclosed to- day that more than Ameri- can troops have pulled back from the Cambodian border area, to'meet, a-new. Viet Cong threat to the sprawling Long Binh-Bien Hoa military complex hear Saigon. Airmen Restricted At'Tan Son Nhiit atrbase, near the U.S. airmen .we're .restricted' to -the base .in case -of the attacks, but" other servicemen'Jn the Saigon area were not restricted. A' spokes- man .explained restrictions were up to the unit commander. Secretary of State William. P. '.'Rogers, visited-U.5. at Tan ''Son Nhut for briefirig'ori mili- tary operations and pacification efforts and planned to travel to some, outlying villages later in the day as he continued his fact-finding .tbiir. Military analysts said, despite the increased threat of shelling! and terrorist'attacks, they: did not anticipate any major ground offensive against.'the.capital. .Reporting.the troop" pullback, sources said two battalions of the US. 1st Air Cavalry Divi- sion had been moved from War Zone C along the border to1 Waf Zone D" northeast of Saigon. Both areas long have been dom- inated by enemy troops and are used as staling areas for at- tacks on US and South Viet- namese bases and towns north of Saigon. The sources said the Viet Cong's 5th Division was report- ed moving south and southeast out of War Zone D after receiv- ing replacements for the heavy losses it suffered Feb. 23 in an unsuccessful offensive against Bien Hoa. Military analysts anticipate the 5tK plans to launch another drive against the bases, which include the U.S. Army's South Vietnamese headquarters, the U.S. 2nd Field Force and a ma- jor fighter-bomber base. B52 bombers also have stepped up their strikes in the area to knock out enemy base camps and supply depots. Reports said.the North Viet- namese were still clinging to peak of. Dong Ap Bia Mountain on the Laotian border just west of the A Shau Valley. Paratroopers' of the 101st Air- borne' Division have been trying for a week to capture the moun- tain, said'to be a major enemy, base. The 101st claimed it had killed more than 200 enemy troops. U.S. losses.were reported as 39. killed and 227 wounded. Kenison Boosted For Fbrtas' Seat CONCORD, N H (AF) The state's top four Republican elected office-holders -have told President Nliton that New Hamp- shire Supreme Court Chief Jus- tice Frank R. Kehisoh would an excellent IKS. Supreme Court justice. Gov Walter Peterson, Sen. Norns Cotton, and Reps James Cleveland and'Lpuis Wyman rec- .the President name Kenison to the vacancy created by the recent resignation of US. Supreme Court Justice Abe For- tas In a letter to Nixon Friday, they said Republican a former state attorney general who wa< appointed to the five member state Supreme, Court in April, K5J bnv made an "out- standing contribution to balanced jurisprudence." Kenison, of twice chairman of the National Conference of State Chief Jus- tices, was out' of and not available .for comment on the recommendation. They uid Keniion ii "well known and very highly regarded by members of the profession in all parti of the country." even-handed responsive and responsible wdicial'deristoni pa the CauM." they added, "would help assure the quality of judicial decisions at the highest level of American jurisprudence for years to come. It. would, also contribute greatly to an enhanced public confidence in the U.S..Supreme Court at both federal and state levels." Kenison is.due for mandatory retirement from the state's high- est tribunal in November, 1977. Milford Baptists To Build Church MILFORD The Baptiit Church has named Frank Rand- lett chairman of a "building drive for a new church this fall. The agreed that it would be more economi- cal to construct a new church rather than 're'palr the .present itruclure on South Street, The Rev. Glen C Bachelder aid the present building was more than M yean old, and urged that la new church bt built., .The parish voted' to acquire land at West and Spauldinr Streets for the new building, to be designed and constructed by, Christian UU Church Buildings, Whitton. 111.   

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