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Nashua Telegraph: Monday, February 3, 1969 - Page 6

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - February 3, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                               NASHUA TELEGRAPH, NASHUA. N.H. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 8, 1961 Courts Overwhelmed By Backlog of Cases for more By MALCOLM BAKU WASHINGTON-CAP) A re- port sent to the attorney general today showed that the backlog of civil and criminal cases pend- .ing in U.S. district courts at the of the last fiscal stood at a record report, prepared by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, said the backlog rose 71 per cent from 1955 al- though the number of cases (iled remained "relatively sta- ble." As part of his fight against the rising tide of crime in the coun- possible. try, President Nixon hai called The Administrative Office re- port indicated the .backlog at end of. fiscal 1968 consisted of ditial Conference of the United criminal cases pending States also expressed concern and civil suits. prosecutors in order to dispose of the cases faster. A companion report by the Ju- CUt t----------. federal judges and over requests for continuance. about congested court calendars and suggested in addition to more judges: careful analysis of the inventory pending cases. to defense law- yers of the need to complete trial preparations as promptly Officer Switches Armies To Get Viet Assignment FT. BENNING, Ga. (AP) Lt.. Col. Peter G. Fleming picked an unorthodox route to Vietnam. He switched armies. Until Friday, Flem- ing was an officer in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, a regiment of (he British army. He eight hours. Saturday, he was sworn in as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army by .Maj. Gen. John M. Wright Jr., commanding gener- al of Ft. Benning, so- he can be sent to duty in Vietnam. Fleming wore an. American uniform borrowed from the wid- ow of a friend who died in ac- tion in Vietnam. He was then assigned as executive officer of Taxpayers Ask IRS Q I'm all set to file ray rc- the 197th Light Infantry Brigade at Ft. Benning, until he can be transferred to. Vietnam. Fleming's U.S. mission is temporary- It was arranged aft- er he received some precedent- setting, red-tape-cutting waivers from the British government which took several months. The waivers remove Fleming from complying with a regula- tion that commissioned officers wait, five years. after their re- tirement from the British Army before they join any other mili- tary service.. The 42-year-old officer has served 22 years in the British India, Africa and Southeast Asia. In 1961 he fought guerrillas in Malaysia and Borneo. But the British wouldn't send him to Vietnam. Fleming said he tried unsuccessfully to get (here as an observer, and found it "professionally frustrating when he could not.. He has been at Ft. Benning since 1966, serving as British liaison officer to the U.S. Army Infantry School and Infantry Center a job- he described jok- defendant may expect to get jury trial, according to statisti- and thorough cai data in the report, is 5.8 of months.-This varies from a high of 22.8 months in the Eastern District of New York to 1.4 months in the Western District of Kentucky. Defense lawyers and U.S. at- torneys generally consider 4 to 6 -weeks as a maximum Kthat a lerson should await a jury trial. The following figures show the median time defendants await ury trial, in federal courts across the nation, with the me- dian time it takes to process guilty pleas in parentheses: First circuit, 7.8 months (3 Second circuit, 10.5 third circuit 9 fourth circuit 4.6 fifth cir- cuit 6.3 sixth circuit 4.0 seventh circuit 9.3 eighth Circuit 5.5 ninth circuit 4.6 tenth circuit 3.4 and the District of Colum- bia 10.1 The median for the 89 dis- ricts of the tenth district and he District of Columbia is a 5.S month wait for jury trial, a wait of 4.6 months for trial without ury and a wait of 2.2 months to an M.A. degree uum A Wait until your W-2 arrives. said. his Margaret and their The law requires employers to 15.yeal..0ia daughter Cormna issue tax withholding statementsjprobably will stay at Ft. Ben- to employees by January 31 soining wnen he is shipped to vou should receive the statement where the action is. They can. shortly. They're U.S. dependents now. If you don't get your W-2 state- ment by January 31 ask your employer about it. Q Where can I get a copy of the new 1040 ES tar form? A About 13 million new esti- mated tax form packages -will be mailed to taxpayers February 1. If you filed an estimated tax declaration more than last year or, owed when you filed viduals, in the mail. The new forms are your 1967 return, you will receive a 1040 ES form, Declaration of. Estimated Income Tax for Indi- dressed to assure proper identifi- cation of estimated tax credits. Be sure to use your preaddressed form when you file. Others filing for the first time should get a Form 1040 ES from their District Director. Q When parents are divorced! 'vhich the Kills 66 Pigs BORDENTOWN, N.J. (AP) At least, pigs died when a them upset at an exit ramp of the New Jersey Turnpike. Jan Carter, 28, of Pierceton, Ind., driver of the truck, es- caped injury. State police said the trucks maintenance one gets to claim children as dependents? A Generally' the parent who has custody of the child for the greater part of the year is en- titled to the dependency exemp- tion. However, if the other parent contributes at least during the year to the support of the child he or she. may be entitled to the exemption. There is also a special rule for a parent who port during the year but does have custody. D tio Commands Base day. At the same time, Cross also will become commander of the 75th Tactical Reconnaissance .special ruie lor a paium wuv wing at Bergstrom Air Force furnishes more than of iffir6] the 12th Air Force judicial' control ,The .median time In, which :nter a guilty plea. Providing additional head- iches for court administrators jnd judges across the nation are he increasing numbers of civil cases. More than 10 per cent of these have been pending nearly hree years. A backlog of cases has grown too in the U.S. courts of appeal. Fifty-three per cent of-appeals stem from criminal actions and applications for habeas corpus, ;he -report said. The ever-increasing work load of the appeals courts over the decade is illustrated by the new appeals filed in 1960, com- pared with the filed in 1968. Three Minutes A Day Bj REV. JAMES KELLER EARLY WEEK SPECIALS Mon. Tues. -Wed. Feb. 3rd, 4th 5th FROZEN Ready Made family, 23 Strong Frederick J. O'Donucll, widower, and Fran- ces Bradey, wodow, kiss each other following their marriage in Blessed Sacrament Church in Boston Sunday, surrounded by their 23 chil- dren. O'DonneU, an city clerk In Bos- ton, father of 13 children, and Mrs. Bradey, mother of It, met when she got a job In the city clerk's department. (AP ffircphoto) POUND BAG Couple Starts Married Life With Family of 23 Children. BOSTON (AP) Mr. and Mrs. Frederick J. O'DonneU are starting their married life with a family of 23 the aridcgroom says he wbuldn't want it to be any different. Even the priest was at a loss for words Sunday as O'DonneU, 49, a widower, and Frances Brady, a widow, took their vows Royal Family's Fashions Kindle Interest in America STUDENT PUTS BODY ON ICE Before his death at 24, a col- lege student ordered his' body frozen in the hope that someday a cure might be found for the in- fection that took his life. An avid reader of science fic- tion, he joined the Cryonics So Bv NADEANE WALKER LONDON (AP) The investi- ture of Prince Charles as Prince of Wales on July 1 this year has given English manufacturers an idea for boosting exports. It's the -Windsor Line, officially adopted by the British Hens'- wear Guild, and it will be launched in America at a con- vention in Chicago this week. Nobody has thought of Charles.as a fashion plate be- fore. But Tailor Cutter, the men's wear bible here, pointed out that "our .royal family seems to kindle more enthu- siasm in the breasts of Ameri- cans .than among the cynical younger generation 'growing up at home." Undisputed leader The Duke of Windsor, an. un- disputed fashion leader while Prince of Wales, set the seal of State police smu uic uon, ne jomea IMS cargo shifted causing it to keel cjety. He left instructions that maintenance uric lAoallv his over. Turnp-se maintenance once was dead, his men built a temporary corral body- would be specially pre- from a snow fence to keep the m a giant bottle cooled pigs off the toll road. Many of by nitrogen, them came tumbling out of the broken roof trailer. ceus ana sian can The 225-pound porkers were cessfuUy thawed after refrigera- en route from farms in Illinois tion to packer in Wrightstown. human longing for survi val after death finds many _ i forms of expression. What they Promoted; have in common is the convic- tion that this brief journey can't ie "all there is." But human desire, however ar royal approval on several fads: suede shoes, midnight blue and double-breasted dinner jackets, wide ties and spread collars. British manufacturers hope the magic of .the title will work- again. The Windsor Line, they say, is "an updating of the gay London of the '30s, i long, lean look." n AUSTIN Tex. (AP) o dent annot change (he inevita James U. Cross, who served as h God wh d h announced.' s have part to play. The quality of our future existence is no arbi- trary thing. It is deeply affected by how effectively our faith reaches out to our brother men in acts of compassionate love. "He will have compassion ac- Bold plaids' and such colors as fore him. Tudor blue, Georgian silver, re- gency gold, whisky, salmon, Scotch pine and peat brown fig- ure importantly in the new line. So will wide lapels, wider ties', colored shirts, bold stripes and checks, Donegal tweeds and suppressed waists. One manu- facturer will show in Chicago trousers that are "high rising to a shaped hip and waist fitting, with a fishtail back legs long and narrow, with a definite flare below the knee." With irreverence, Carnaby Street is pushing a similar '30s line as "the Butch Look-" While the guild hasn't decreed any hairstyles to go with the Wind- sor Line, Carnaby Street advo- cates cropped hair and heavy boots with the Butch. It's a com- plete revolt, they say, against fancy, frilly men's wear and long hair. What Prince Charles himself makes of it all is anybody's guess. One male fashion writer forecast that will ignore Guild's attempt to cast him in the role of Prince Charming." But he may set styles, unwill- ingly or unwittingly, as many royal personages have done be- "Prince Charles the Menswear with his 13 children and her 10 filling the first two pews. "For once I'm the Rev. William Benet said as he looked out at the gathering of some 550 persons. O'DonneU ignored the tradi- tion of not seeing the bride be- fore the ceremony, breaking away from well-wishers as she entered the Blessed Sacrament church, grasping both of her hands and saying: "Fran, you look absolutely beautiful." O'DonneU then led his bride own the aisle. "I'm not giving anything he said just efore they started down. After the ceremony and a re- eption, the couple left for a wo-week wedding trip during hich relatives will care for the lildreri; O'DonneU, assistant city clerk f Boston, met his petite, dark- aired bride-to-be when she took job in his department. When they decided on mar- age, O'Donnel! bough! a hree-family house which ley've converted into a 16- oom one-family After the honeymoon, Fran ran't return to her job, but will ake over the bigger one of run- ing that house. Three of the Brady children re married while O'Donnell's iree oldest girls will share an partment of their own, so .that, s Kevin Brady, 17, said; There'll be only 17 of us kids at enough." DSlOaea Feb. 3 Woman, 104, Fools Doctor; Survives Premature Birth WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) On Feb. 1, 1865, a tiny two- pound baby was born to Mr. and Mrs. James A. Gebhart of Balti- more, Md. The-doctor told the Gebharts their child would not live through the day.. But the child did live. Satur- day she celebrated her 104th birthday at her home here. Mrs. Florence R. Crumlish, the sprightly centenarian-plus, spurns glasses, hearing aid and cane. irvorcea or Brents ill Hyosophobia is .a fear of high cording to the abundance of His j Lovcs t0 Relate seiner provide more than half effaces; acrophobia'is a fear of steadfast love.. .She loves to relate the story.of ho Minmrt 'beine at a sreat height. (Lamentations 3.3.) h Drematur. birth and the child's support. NOTICE MM WW TAX RtrilKN TO'- INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE CENTER 310 LOWELL STUEET Honolulu Suburb] HONOLULU (AP) Lt. Goy, Thomas P. Gill suggests the is- land of Molokai, 20 miles south-: east of Oahu Island, could be- come a suburb of Honolulu. "Its closeness'to Honolulu, the rapid development of effiicnt short range aircraft and the in- credible population pressures of Honolulu may yet turn parts of REALTY COURSE FREE LECTURE, TUES., FEI. 4, 7 P.M. AU CLASSES HELD AT NASHUA YWCA AND WOMEN, VOUB irdUie of Obtain your broker's ount nmi onn TUIIJF nuvnBuiiEu oj in, lull DiUili (I Fro Mulini or Itr phtni COILICT, III INITITUTC, IrtoMint. tlrt nunt will M title) In Nmhun. Apprnte Let the hope of future life, Jesus, be a spur to action and not an excuse for passivity. her premature..birth prediction that she wouldn't sur- vive. "They wrapped me In a down she said, "and three j hours after I was born, I was christened.. They say I screamed murder when the Ished by construction of Inter- state 95. She finally conceded defeat and moved into an apart ment. Three of her four children are living. She has 14 grandchildren and, she estimates, "about 30 great-grandchildren they keep Mrs. .Crumlish describes her long life as "one big yesterday wrapped in a package. Anc when you open it up, it's fillec with all sorts of good and the bad. But troubles make you appreciate the gooi when it comes." Molokai into said Sunday. a Gill priest put salt on my tongue and the priest said, 'She'll live. She's got a wonderful pair of Mrs. Crumlish stands less than 5 feet and weighs only 100 pounds.rbut ,she irknown in Wil- mington as "the fiery foe of the freeway." From 1962 to 1961 she waged a'pitched battle to save her 'home from being dempl- Largest use of salt is in the preparation of chemicals, account- ing for about 70 per cent usage in the United States. FAY'S PLACE Cor. W. Hollit I Ask St. For Your Late Hour Eating Pleasure OPEN TO .3 A.M. Thurs. Frl. It Sat. NigWs STYLE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE IN DIAMOND RINGS (fflolitaire duets styled to wtekly make your diamonds Tailored simplicity look much larger! ICOTT't DIAMONDS GUARANTEED IN WRITING FUlltlUK-IN VALUE ALWAYS veil ml lull priei oi your diamond when-1 you'rt rtidy It I trMi Itr t Urgir ttt trick.' tta fiery brilliance of your diamond and criatet tire Illusion o reiler she. MAIN'IT. NAIHUA HOURS: TMW.-M. 8 A.M. to S P.M. ani to P.M. SAT. 8 A.M. to New Mode Barber School 42 Chestnut Sr. NORGE HEAVY DUTY WASHERS DRYERS U.S. No. 1 MICHIGAN POUND BAG OSCAR MAYER VARIETY PAC WASH 2 to 18 Ibs. of clothes Parts k Labor Guarantee at no extra cost C. J. McKUSKIE CO. Authorized Norge Dealer Sales t Service Since MM 160 W. Pearl St. 882-5519 Heating t Appliances 12 bz. PACKAGE OSCAR MAYER SLICE of HAM C BREEZE size SILVER DUST 8T giant size 38 01. VIM 69' COLD WATER YouVegood for more at Beneficial even as much as A Beneficial All-in-One Loan takes cure of every- loans, time-payment accounts, bills, expenses gives yon .the-extra cash you want as well. Phone where the money is. BENEFICIAL FINANCE SYSTEM Loans up to up to 48 months to repay NASHUA Finance Co. of Nashua 182 Main St., Sears Roebuck......... MILFORO Beneficial Flnarfce Co. of Milford Nashua St., Utchis BWg., Union Sq.......Pnotii! flNANCE CO. quart ALL 79' DOVE LIQUID 62' 22 oi, SPRY 42 ox. OO SWAN LIQUID 22 ox. LIFEBUOY BATH WISH quart RINSOBIUE 83' giant ADVANCED ALL 59 oz. FINAL TOUCH 87' 33 ei. LUX FLAKES 3 8 LIFEBUOY REG. DISHWASHER 20 ex. ALL 44' LUX REGULAR FLUFFY ALL 3 pounds LUX LIQUID 22 oi. HANDY ANDY 32 oi. 69 LUX BATH PRAISE BATH   

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