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Nashua Telegraph: Friday, January 24, 1969 - Page 1

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - January 24, 1969, Nashua, New Hampshire                               Today's Chucklt GOSSIP: What goes in both ears and comes out of the mouth, rrettly enlarged. 1969 T.l.groph'. 100th Y.ar At A Daily Mtwipoptr Weather Roiny, Mild Tonight Little Change Saturday. FULL REPORT ON PAW TWO VOT inn NO' VOL, 100 NO. .276 ataHMwl i> i Weekly October u Drily. Mireh'i; NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, FRIDAY, JANUARY Second Clau At Nashua, N. H. 16 PAGES Price TEN SAIGON (AP) The U. S. Command announced to- day a medical evacuation helicopter was, shot down in the central highlands killing seven and bringing the war'f total of choppers lost in combat to 999. Belated Report The command also belatedly announced that a helicopter shot down Jan. 15 south of Da Nang killed Col. Michael M. Spark, 41, Alexandria, Va., commander of the 3rd Marine. Division's 3rd Regiment. Six others, including a Marine officer, died with him in the flaming crash. Spark was the 'first Marine regimental commander killed in Vietnam. The medical evacuation heli- copter was downed Thursday in the central highlands 23, miles northwest of 'Pleiku. 'Three wounded American! and four crewmen were killed. The com- mand said it was clearly marked with red crosses. In addition to the number of helicopters lost in combat, the U.S. Command said have been lost since Jan. 1, 1961, due to mechanical failure, enemy barrages that caught them on the ground and ofher causes. Meanwhile, U.S. military ana- lysts 'said from now until mid- February is a critical period in the Vietnam war because of the peace talks in Paris. and the new'administration in Washing- ton. These experts dp not see any imminent threat to Saigon, in- stead they anticipate enemy at- tacks on the provinces along the Cambodian border northwest to northeast of the Binh Long and Phuoc Long. Pressure U.S. The! analysis' said intelligence, reports indicate the Communist command plans to increase, opv erations in ,an attempt to .give Hie .negotiators from Hanoi ant! the Viet Cong greater leverage in Paris and'to put pressured on the Nixon" administration while it is still An enemy winter-spring offcn- sive has been anticipated.since last Dec. 13, hut the experts said they believe the'UiS'.'and South Vietnamese .operations that have smashed, numerous bases and captured hundreds'of tons of supplies have upset the Viet'Cong's timetable. Because Cambodia is off lim- its, to U.S. and South Viet- forces, suppb'es stock- piled just over the border are available to the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese for opera- tions nearby in (he. three north- ern provinces of the 3rd Corps Area, which has Saigon its heart. "The enemy is not in a posi- tion to attack Saigon right one source said. conceded, however, that Viet Gong can make terror blow up allied installa: i tlons and pull off assassinations inside the capital. He estimated there are now 400 to 500 special action troops in Saigon, agents trained in terror, assassination and use of explosives. In the only significant ground fighting reported today, South Vietnamese said their tniops killed 44 Viet Cong In tht Mekong. Delta Thursday after- noon 103 miles southwest of Sai- gon. Only one South Vietnamese soldier was reported wounded, because artillery and air strikes were the chief government, weapons. A few scattered shellings were reported during the night, including mortar attacks on base camps of the U.S. J5th In- fantry Division 40 miles north- west of Saigon and the llth Light Infantry Brigade 65 miles south of Da Nang. A few Ameri- cans were reported wounded but 'none were killed. Field reports said troops of the ilth Light Infantry Brigade closed out their cordon opera- tion against an abandoned lag'e-which enemy troops had' fortified hear the brigade's base camp.. The reports, said the; finally swept through the village unopposed, and what' remained of an esti- mated ISO-man enemy force ap- parently had slipped out spme- tuife-'duririg the four nights the was under siege. The U.S, Command said 26. enr emy. todies were found, .while three Americans were killed and-25" were wounded. Four Tried to Quit Johnson's Cabinet By JOSEPH A. LOFTUS Ntw York Timu NIWI liniet WASHINGTON -.Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz, as we'l as Secretary of the Interior Stewart L. Udall, offered Jo re- sign from President Johnson's cabinet. They were among three, pos- sibly' cabinet members wliose relationship with President ,-became strained -.in the closing days of the adminis- tration. The third was Ramsey Clark, attorney The evidence is less clear in the "case qf Wilbur J. Cohen, Secretary ;of Health, Welfare, but some sources say that'he, like Clark, had incurred presi- dential displeasure because of aggressive- actions and p r o- noimcemchts in recent weeks. Not A fact lliat may be .unrelated though some sources take it as proof of the strain was the omission of. these four men from the guest list of a farewell luncheon given by the departing Secretary of Defense, Cla r It Clifford, for Johnson, Vice Pres- ident Hubert H. Humphrey, the FUEL OIL SAVE MORE With LORDEH OIL CO. INC. Serving aod itirrouad- Icr towni. 465-2267 PIZZA by Charles Famous thru out New England 147 W. Pearl St. Finest in fall varieties) Regular Charles SPECIAL PIZZA TUESDAY QOc ONLY Ttl.phon. IM-454J Open II A.M. to 2 A.M. Mon. thru Sundiyi 3 P.M.'ft Midnlto oilier cabinet members, and i few congressmen. Clifford was host to this group at his home after the inaugura- tion on Monday. Wirtz submitted :his resigna- tion in October. The immediate cause was a conflict over de- partmental policy, but his troii- the President month earlier after Jie made a doyisli statement JJfttll then, said a.former'as- sociate of Wirtz, "Bill could do no wrong." -The flare-up was papered-over no more than that. ;UdalPs proffer of his resigna- tion last Saturday has already been reported. Information ob- tained, since then indicates that his problems with Johnson dealt with more than the issue of How many acres should be set aside in National parklands. Udall, like Wirz, was a.dis- senter on the administration's Vietnam policy, though he had made no. public statements. Johnson and the four r e- mained on speaking terms but barely so in the case of Udall! and Cohen went to Andrews Air Force Base.Mon- day for a farewell to the chief. Wirtz, in a labor convention speech in Sacramento last Sep- tember, said that if lie had been :delegate to the Democratic National Convention he would have, voted. for the Vietnam peace was opposed by the President. The labor secretory had already communi- cated his feeling about Vietnam to Johnson. BILLS ARE A PAIN ;LET A. B. 0. HELP YOD GET OUT OF DEBT' v BT CONSOHDATJNG 'TODJt '.BITiIil PAST DUE OB NOT. .TOO AVOID DONS _ tETOSRg ATO. THBBATENWB PBOJTE NOT A 10AN ivo BECPRrrr NO CO-SIGNERS TF TOU OWE TAT AS LOW AS WEEKLY JZ.OOO JS6 WBBKIT JS.OOO fas WEEKLY _ exui OB lor ef Kind Vemontm nil- Koorn 101 M it. 813-1757 BUDGET CONSULTANTS i Salem M -L Girl Works for VC Other uniformed guerrilla workers watch a young girl operate a lathe to finish grenade casings in a jungle Viet Cong munitions plant. This scene is from a 16mm film seized by government troops which overran a Viet Cong information center in U Minh forest recently. (AP Wirephoto) The death of two; teen- agers in separate accidents in Hudson and nearby Salem have brought New Hampshire's highway fa- tality toll for the year   Aiken- of Vermont, Edward W. Brooke of Massachusetts, Nor- ris Cotton -of New Hampshire, Winston L. Prouty of Vermont, and Margaret Chase Smith of Maine. Opposed were Sens. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., Thomas J; Mclntyre, D-N.H., Edmund S. 'Muskie, D-Ma'ine, John 0. Pa- store, D-R.I.; 'and Claiborne Pell, D-R. I. Sen. Abraham A. Ribicoff, D- Conn., was paired 'against con- firmation.1 Mansfield, .paired firmation; said. the .vote nt significance future and "we're very hopeful relation! will, be- good." Hickel, whose views .on con- servation and water pollution had stirred a storm of contro- versy, was the last of Ntxon'l 12 Cabinet appointees to be ap- pioved The others were sworn in Wednesday. Also confirmed Thursday was multimillionaire California .in- dustrialist David R Packard deputy secretary of defense The vote was 82 to 1 Tennes- see Democrat Albert Gore, de- claring the nomination constj- lutes "a conflict of interest Slain as the nose on your cast the single "nay." Packard's stock holdings in an electronics com- pany he helped begin raised tlji conflict-of-interest questions. His company has done substth- tial business with the Defenst Department, so Packard plans to put the stock in a trust from which he will derive no mcomt or profit Dividends and any increase in the stock's value will go to char- ity and education, but he can re claim it when he leaves govern- ment service. AH IS dissenting votes on HM Hickel nomination were cist >y Democrats All Republicans ei- ther voted for the Alaska gover- nor or stated support of him. The dissenters included suck luminaries as Fdward M Ken- nedy, the party whip Fred K. Harris, the chairman of tional Democratic Gommittet and Sen. and Eugene J McCarthy, posslbti 1972 presidential candidates. IF YOU WANT A FREE PERSONAL CHECKING ACCOUNT, SEE US. INDIAN HEAD NATIONAL BANK, fttXI.C. Sale Interior Latex Wall Paint Gal, Nashua Wallpaper Co. Pearl St. Open Thurs, nights 'til FREE CHECKING for Juhiiar ,Senior Citizens NASHUA TRUST COMPANY f, O. TONIGHT IN THE Abby 7 Biossat 'S Classifieds M, 13, 14, 15 Comics Crossword- 12 Editorial 4 .Fininda! 1 .Hal Boyle 5 Laivrence 4 Nariiua Scene 4 Obituaries Sports Suburban Newt 't 11, 11 I, Taylor 4 Television 11 Theaters 11 Dr. Thosteson T Weather Wicker I Rvf -JUST FOR Our ii I for the 1 f'qt 1 ca   

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