Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Nashua Telegraph Newspaper Archive: September 11, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Nashua Telegraph

Location: Nashua, New Hampshire

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - September 11, 1946, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Backs Ouellette On Store Stand Complete Associated Press and Wide World Services NASHUA TELEGRAPH WEATHER Clearing, Cooler Tonight, Thursday VOL. 72. NO. 163. Entered Pott OlMcg it Nashua, N. H., M lecond clam mattor. NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 11, 1946 Established 1832 PRICE: FOUR CENTS NY STRIKE HITS NASHUA PLANTS Table City Purchasing Agent Plan Says Aldermen Have No Authority Takes Position He Was Granted Full Powers to Act Aldermen Rebuke Member Mayor Oswald S. Maynard said this morning that under the pow- ers vested in him under the terms of Jthe emergency housing resolution passed some months ago, he considered he bad all au- thority to handle any situation arising over the use of the land at the housing center and that he has instructed Aid Henry 3. Ouellette to go ahead with his plans to operate a store there. The Mayor said that the mat- ter did not need to" come before the aldermanic Lands and Build- ing committee and that they would have no authority over the emergency housing site until the emergency was over when land would revert to the city. Plan of Aid Henry 1. Ouellefte to operate a general store at the veterans center for the conven- ience of the 80 families who will live on Rancourt st ran into trouble at the meeting of the) Board of Aldermen after Aid Raoul T. April charged last night he had not secured the neces- j sary permission from the Lands j and Building committee. This was freely admitted by Alderman Ouellette who said he had been "misled" as fo the pro- per procedure and that he had asked City Solicitor Leonard G. Velishka to draw up a lease and had understood that this was all that was necessary. MAYOR BACKS Page 5 Parking Space Off Street Parking Lot for Autos Approved by Aid. SENATE GROUP TO PROBE GIFTS TO SHIP SPONSORS Washington, Sept 11 ate Mead committee intends to hold public hearings on war- time shipbuilders' gifts of dia- rriond bracelets, watches, silver-, ware and other baubles to some j studied the possibility of the use women who swung Christ- the property ouncd by the ening bottles at ship launchings. Lithuanian Co-Op as a city park- Chairman Mead (D-NY) said inS lot. He said, if adopted, it the committee had intended mean the levelling and withhold the list ot the gifts' grading of the property by the and the recipients until hearings. Board of Public Works. The The Maritime Commission, how- agreement, he said, would be ever made it public yesterday. Mead said the committee's in- An off-street parking lot at the corner of High st and Washing- ton st, owned by the Lithuanian Co-Operative association, was assured for the use of motorists last night when aldermen passed at resolution authorizing trie mayor to enter into an agree- ment with the Lithuanian Co- Operative association relative to the parking of automobiles there. Traffic Chairman, Aid James W. Logan, reported to the Board that the traffic committee had Aldermen At One Time Favored Plan Aldermen last night squashed the city purchasing department ordinance which would have des- ignated Hie city treasurer as pur- chasing agent and would have foiced all purchases over 5100 to be made en competitive bidding. Action on the ordinance, spon- sored by Aid James W. Logan, was held over from the August meeting which Alderman Logan was unable to attend. Ud Henry J. Ouellette moved that the ordinance be tabled in- definitely and Aid Conrad H. Bellavance seconded. Sponsor Lo jan expressed his appreciation in the Board's delaying action on the measure until he was able to be present to speak for the ordinance. He recalled the fact that 12 aldermen attending a TABLE CITY Page 6 CANAL ST BOY SEVENTH POLIO VICTIM HERE Seventh case of polio here was reported by the Board of Health chairman, Dr Ernest 3. Fraser, fol lowing diagnosis yesterday afternoon of the illness of Ar- thcir Fontaine, 5-year-old son of Mr and Mrs Victor Fontaine of 132 Canal st. Arrangements were made by the family physician and the Board of Health for the transfer of the youngster to the Balch wing of Elliot hospital ir- Man- chester where he is receiving treatment. Two other cases were reported in the state last night, both in Manchester. At a meeting of the Manchester Health board last night it is reported it was de- cided to reopen the schools in that city next Wednesday un- less a rash of additional cases of polio broke out at the end of the week. terest arose from complaints that relatives of officials in the Mari- time Commission were frequent- ly named as ship sponsors. similar to that entered into bv the city with the St Patrick's parish on the Spring st parking lot. Nashua Woman Heads State GOP Ladies Group Mrs Mabel Thompson Cooper He stressed the heavy sched- e under which the BPW has'of Nashua will head the Wo- The sponsors ranged j been operating for the past six man's Division of the Republi- from Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt, wife I months and praised its volume of the late President, to women' of W51k turned ouf in the welders in shipyards. j expressing doubt as to the de- Tha most valuable gift report OFF STREET Page 6 was a diamond brace- let received by Mrs William D. Leahy, wife of President Roose- velt's personal chief of staff, from the Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock corporation, Chester, Pa. Mrs Leahy, who died in 1942, SENATE GROUP Page 6 EMPTY SHELVES IN NEW YORK STORE-Manager Edward Culhane expresses helpless- ness at the empty shelves in his A P store in mid-town Manhattan, explaining to a custo- mer that the truck dnvers' strike in the New York area has brougiit the situation about. The company announced all of it. 500 stores in the area would be closed, due to lack of food to sell, if the strike continues. NH Draft Calls Set at 79 For September, 130 in Oct. Although September and Oc- tober induction ca Us upon the Nashua draft board have not been made public, it was learn- ed today from the office of State Director of Selective Service, General Charles F. Bowen, that over-all calls in New Hampshire for September total 79, while for October will mount to 130. Concord, Sept 11 The Sep- tember induction call upon the twenty Local Boards in New Hampshire will total seventy- nine men and the October call will include one hundred thirty men, according to Brig General Charles F. Bowen, US Army, state director of Selective Service. September inductions call, the first to follow the two months induction holiday, will occur during the period September 25 and 26. "Until this time, it has not been permissible under War De- partment and Navy Department policies to make public the total number involved in calls for in- General Bowen said. "However, these policies have now been liberalized so that it is now possible to release this information. NH DRAFT Page 6 Murder in the U. S. Held in After Kidnapping Terre Haute. Ind, Sept 11 Mrs Mildred Louise Everett, 22, was held in jail in default of bond following her ar- raignment in city court yester- day on vagrancy charges in con- nection with the kidnaping of three year old Madeline (Toby) Tobias of Kansas City, Mo. LAND CLEARING and GRADING work done with bulldozer. Stanley Dubowik 10 Spring St. Tel. 4340 Surprise Raids Uncover Hidden Nazi Wealth Frankfurt, Sept 11 Sur- prise raids throughout the Ameri- can and British occupation zones of Germany have uncovered mil- lions of dollars worth of precious j stones and metals hidden by I the Nazis shortly before Ger- 'many surrendered, United States Army headquarters announced today. The diamonds, gold, silver and platinum found in the raids were dispersed in hiding places by a Nazi government agency in an attempt to keep them from fall- ing into Allied hands. A spokesman United plates Army Intelligence di- vision said it was "conjectural but conceivable" that the hoard might have been designed to finance "a resurgence of Ger- man Nationalist movements." GROMYKO TO RESUME ATTACK AGAINST GREECE Lake Success, Ny, Sept 11 Soviet Delegate Andrei A. Gro- myko was expected to make a final effort in the United Na- tions Security Council today to bolster Ukrainian charges that the present Greek government is a threat to peace in the Balk ins. As the delegates prepared to meet at 3 pm (EOT) 1hey had before them a Brazilian motion that the council leave the Greek case, at least temporarily, and pass on to the next item on the agenda. There appeared little likeli- hood, however, that action would be taken on this proposal until after Gromyko had been heard again. The Soviet delegate al- FIRE, AUTOMOBILE and other fines of coverage R Crowley INSURANCE AGENCY WILLIAM F SULLIVAN Agent TO. 487 171 Mala St ffoahoa. H. USED CARS WANTED We pay OPA ceiling prices Mercer Bros. Garage Co. lt9 MAIN IIT. Est. 1014 TEL. 614 Mrs Thompson Cooper can State committee for the next two years, the first time that the honor has ever come to a local woman. Mrs Cooper handled the de- tails of the Dale campaign for governor, female division, in the primary and did an outstanding job. Merrill Calkins of Manchester, another Dale worker, is to be chairman of the state committee. Revolving Dryer Stand in place to hang wash. Lightw.istitl Easy Jo earryl Folds compactiy. TEL. 3910 4 3911 186 MAIN ST. Dover, Del, Sept 11 50- year old overall clad farmer walked into a sheriff's office with a shotgun cradled in his arms and calmly announced he had just shot a state welfare board woman worker to keep four of his children from being placed in a home. Deputy Attorney General Hen- ry Ridgely said the farmer, whorr he identified as Thomas Griffith, of about 25 miles west of here, would be ar- raigned on a murder charge in connection with the fatal shoot- ing yesterday of Ruth Reinecke, 50, the social worker. Griffith has not been formally charged. Baltimore, Sept 11 ard Elmer Clayton, 40-year-old painter charged with slashing to death a 30-year-old widowed mother of two boys, told police he and the woman, Mrs Sadie Jackson, had got into an argu- ment over a broken bottle of whisky, Police Capt William Murphy said today. Mrs Jackson's body, which medical examiners said had been slashed across the throat, breasts and shoulders, was found wrap- ped in a blanket and secreted behind a wardrobe in Clayton's MURDER page 6 GROMYKO Page 6 St Louis, Sept 11 searched for a motive today for the murder of Mrs Irene Eng- land Elsing, attractive 27-year- old divorcee and mother of two children, whose trussed and weighted body was found float- ing in the Mississippi river five days after she disappeared from her home. Her body bore no marks of violence, but her legs and feet were bound by baling wire and two seven-pound sash weights were_tied to her body. A coron- er's jury returned an open ver- dict. v Six Hurt in Vermont Crash STATE AP NEWS Hanover, Sept persons injured, in a three-car collision at Hartland, Vt, were recovering today at Mary Hitchcock hos- pital here. They were Mrs Helen Towne, 36, of Hartland; her son, Law- rence, two; Mrs Julia Dow, 27, of Springfield, Mass, and her three children, Judy, 5, Cathy, 9 months, and Carol Ann, whose age police did not report. Urges Action To Prevent 'Squatting' Washington, Sept 11 Clare Boothe Luce telegraphed a half dozen veterans' organiza- tions today urging them to take voluntary action to head off any i squatters invasion of private pro- iperty such as has occurred in 1 England. Mrs Luce told a reporter she urged the veterans groups to form committees to consult with local real estate boards and rental agencies "to urge action making all vacant property im- mediately available for personal occupancy at reasonable rates." She added in her telegram that such action might avert inci- dents similar to those which oc- curred in England and might "forestall government seizure and allocation of vacant pro- perty." Mrs Luce told a newsman she fully expects "Communist ele- ments" in this country to try to stage a drive among homeless veterans to take over any pro- perty they find unoccupied. FURNITURE MOVING ANYWHERE IN NEW HAMPSHIRE OR MASSACHUSETTS LOCAL AND NEW HAMPSHIRE GENERAL TRUCKING 168 MAIN COBLEIGH HOWE 772 INSURANCE FIRE AUTOMOBILE C. I. SPALDING CO. Hoomi OHO IS Ird HMt CADILLAC Be Trailer Wise Hove One of Our Vz Ton BANTAM H. C. LINTOTT 25 Main St. Tel. 77 o L D s M O Card Shop Can't Ship Out Goods Other Plants Soon to Feel Effect of Truck Strike Little Prospect of Settlement Extensive strike of truck driv- ers in New York City has al- ready affected one large concern in town in relation to its manu- factured goods outbound for the metropolitan area, it was learn- ed todaj from a spokesman of the Nashua Gummed anc] Coated Paper company, who stated that the warehouses of the firm are already congested with goods which have been held up here since the beginning of the strike. If no relief comes within a few days, said the spokesman, the situation is going to become ser- ious, as all available warehouse space will be filled with manu- factured goods. In addition, it was said that raw materials in- bound by truck have been held up by the strike, and although a good inventory was on hand when the strike began, continu- ance of it would mean scarcity of raw materials. No closing down of any of the manufacturing plants of the Sim have been discussed as yet, said the spokesman. Officials at the Nashua Manu- facturing company said this morning that the mills have not been affected as yet by shortage of raw materials as a conse- quence of the strike in New York. One official said, however, NY STRIKE Page 5 Inflation 18-Hour Day Is Worth Say Workers, Election Wards Although some 15 of the city's 90-odd election workers, including word moderators, clerks, selectmen and ballot maikers, met at City hall last night and voted to attend last night's aldermanic session in the interests of securing a re- ported pay raise from to S20, no measure was introduc- ed during the meeting. Ward Workers have been paid at the rate oJ a day and seek the S5 raise, it is rumored, on the basis that are employed for 18 hour stretch or more in many of the city's polling booths. Some election workers com- plain that the stipend is too low. Ward moderators, for in- stance, are required to check in at 11.30 a.m. on election day, to go to City hall to secure the ballot boxes, re- main on duty until the count is completed, then return the tally to City hall. Especially in the larger wards this task is not completed until nearly 1 o'clock in the instance of long voting hours, it is represented. In each ward on election days there are on duty a mou- erator, a clerk, three selectmen, and four ballot markers, two representing the Republican and Democratic partie; re- spectively, thus making in all same 89 election workers. Schools to Open Next Wednesday RESOLUTION ON PARK LAND SALE BY-PASSED By-passed last night, apparent- ly because of the unexpected heavy file of aldermanic busi- ness, was a resolution which would authorize the sale of the city's nine acres of park pro- perty at the corner of Manches- ter st and Sargent av. Spokesmen from both the Lands and Building committee and also the group reportedly I interested in acquiring the pro- perty as a site for a Catholic chapel said today it would prob- ably come before the Board at its next meeting. Disappointed in its failure to be presented last night were members of a large delegation of North Enders, some 30 in num- ber, most of whom it is under- stood opposed the sale of any park lands for any purpose. Considerable opposition to the disposition of park property for other purposes is reported to have been forwarded to Aid James W. Logan as alderman of ths ward in which the property in question is located and he had with him last night in readi- RES01LUTION Page 6 As far as is known at the moment school authorities are going ahead with plans to open schools next Wednesday even though polio cases con- tinue to be uncovered. The polio situation in Nash- ua ir, not at an epidemic stage and the prevalence was re- ported as only sporadic in nature. Wards 74th Anniversary Sale! Lock-Grip PLIERS Reduced "JQ Made with strong adjustable j aws that lock tightly. MONTGOMERY WARD ACCOUNTING EVENING COURSES September 16 Veterans Enrolled under Gl Bill of Rights Office Open Evenings for NASHUA BUSINESS COLLEGE Approved by the National Council of Business Schools   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication