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Nashua Telegraph: Monday, September 9, 1946 - Page 1

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   Nashua Telegraph (Newspaper) - September 9, 1946, Nashua, New Hampshire                                Bridges Hits At Yugoslav Shipments Complete Associated Press and Wide World Services NASHUA WEATHER Showers Tonight Clearing Tomorrow VOL.72. NO. 161. Entered the Post Office at Nashua, N. H., as second olass matter. NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 9, 1946 Established 1832 FOUR CENTS STAGE RUN ON MEAT IN NASHUA 7 Escape Serious Injury In 3 Car Crash On DW Highway LONGSHOREMEN REFUSE TO LOAD YUGOSLAV SHIPS New York, Sept 9 Joseph P. Ryan, president of the Inter- national Longshoremen's Asso- ciation said today long- shoremen would not load any re lief supplies for Yugoslavia "un- til proper action is taken against those who were responsible for shooting down our planes" in that country. Ryan asserted that even if the strike of AFL seamen were to end today, there still would be no loading of any vessel with cargoes bound for Yugoslavia. F. H. LaGuardia, general di- rector of UNRRA, said yesterday that Joseph Curran, president of the National Maritime Union had agreed tn order his men to sail UNRRA relief ships to any country provided they were fully loaded. LONGSHOREMEN Page 5 Rev Earl Nauss Resigns as Pastor of First Cong. Church BIG FOUR ASK UN ASSEMBLY DELAY MEETING Paris, Sept 9 Foreign Ministers Council, agreeing to a proposal by Soviet Russia, ask- ed the United Nations General Assembly today to postpone for one month its scheduled Sept 23 meeting in New York to avoid conflict with the Paris Peace Conference. At the same time informed quarters reported that the for- eign ministers had decided to meet in New York next month tion, effective Dec 2, at a meet- to present to the assembly of membeis of the church ALL TREATED AT HOSPITAL FOR MINOR INJURIES Seven persons narrowly es- serious injury in a crash yesterday afternoon on the Dan- iel Webster highway near Lil- lian's cabins involving three cars, which were reportedly driven by Aimand 110 Allds David W. Car- roll of Hudson, and Faustino D'Innocenza of Leommster. According to police, the car driven by Dussault proceed- ing south and attempted to cut out of line and around the ve- hicle driven by the Leominster man. Seeing that he could not make it, police said that Dus- sault then tried 1o swing back into line and in doing so struck the rear of the Massachusetts car which sent the Dussault car swerving into the car being driven north by Cairoll. The Dussault car then turned over in the road, it was said, while 7 ESCAPE Page B! THREE-CAR CRASH Kidnaped Kansas City Girl Found Terre Haute, Ind, Sept 9 I Police Chief Forest Braden said today a child he identified as 3- year-old Madeline (Toby) To- bias, kidnaped Kansas City girl, Rev Earl F. Nauss, Rev Earl F. Nauss, DD, action will be taken on the res- of the First Congregational church, announced his resigna- Dr Nauss is a veteran of both Shortage Will Hit City in Days Ceilings Go Back Tomorrow and Scarcity Will Be Felt Almost at Once Photo with a young above are two of the three cars involved in anaddet the child's abductor. Braden said a man who had to have been J Truing Vn at uciween isuage anu or Rancourt sis. Seven persons reported taken to Memorial World War I and World War II, a newspaper picture of the having returned in February informed officers a girl an- peace treaties which the con-j immediately following the Sun- year after 38 months serv-'swenn? her description was at ference is now drafting for Italy, day morning service. In present-, joe ;n th( us Navy as chaplain 'the rooming house with a Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria and I mg his resignation, Dr Nauss during which time he served Finland. The ministers also .stated that it would DC effective Africa then in the Pa-! Officers were sent to the house hospital, but none was seriously injured. would begin drafting treaties for German and Austria at time, these quarters said. that Dec 2, on the completion of 22 years as pastor. He assumed the cific area during the heaviest of and brought the woman and the fighting, participating in the child to Police headquarters. pastorate of the First church in Philippine and Okinawa mva-1 Braclon said the woman iden- The United States did not join December, 1924, succeeding the s Ons. He also served as Senior !tified hersclf as Mildred King, in the request for postponement of the General Assembly meet- BIG FOUR Page 5 Gunmen Hold Up Laundry Official, Get Only Papers Boston, Sept 9 (.T) Two gun- late Rev Henry E. French, DD. Chaplain at Midshipman's School who had been employed in the _ t _ti______ -n-Tir f TCnncn c Pi f v Vinmo nf Hoi! Polio Spreads Two More Infantile Cases Are Reported in Nashya Two new cases of infantile ing polio and the Board of Health Meat stocks in Nashua mar- kets dwindled steadily today as housewives loaded up with all the meat they could buy in paration for an industry-predict- ed famine. OPA meat price ceil- ings go back into effect tomor- row and iocal butcher shops do not expect a single shipment ot meat here all week. There was steady but not spec- tacular buying in the downtown markets this morning. Meat managers, however, expected the buy ng pace would accelerate by afternoon and said it was a case t of "buy today or go for the rest of the Beef and a little lamb ana mutton were in evidence in the! shovv'cases and luncheon meats and frankfurters were fairly abundant. There was no pork, j ham or bacon to be seen. Prices j were "stiff" on the last day of' the "free" retail market and dications are that dealers will! rot be holding the bag on any meat supplies bought m the free market. Meat-less diet shapes up for trie next two months, dealers here predicted, because of the twin factors of increased meat consumption since Jan 1 and also the heavy slaughtering while price ceilings were off. Also poultry is not in too plenti- ful supply in this section be- cause of the large numbers of flocks killed back in the early summer because of teed short- ages. Washington, Sept 9 ceiling tags go back en canned meats, lard and shortening to- day. Tomorrow they return to fresh meat, thus completing the farm- er to consumer chain started when the price decontrol board orderPd livestock prices HUN ON MEAT Page 6 LIE AND STAFF CONSIDER DELAY IN UN MEETING BLIGHT HAS RUINED CITY TOMATO CROP Special meeting of the church at NY, for a year. has been called for Monday eve-lDunng World War I, Dr Nauss ,_______________ bias. Kansas City home of parents, Mr and Mrs To io- ning, Sept 116, at which time1 KEY EAHL NAUSS Page 5 Abandon Hope of Truce in Worst US Shipping Strike the police chief said the Lake Success, NY, Sept 9 Nashua.s tomato crop is nearly Secretary General Trygve Lie ,1V1 r J summoned his top staff men Per cent blacked out by to' a conference today to take action mato blight and the cost to fam- on a request from the Foreign1 me gardeners wijl mount up to Minister Council that the United several thousands of dollars, it Nations consider postponement was unofficially estimated to- of the general assembly from day as weekend reports show- Sept 23 for one month. ed the heaviest onslaught of the Andrew Cordier, executive as- d scase since 1933. sistant to Lie, said the Secretary-1 The blight, which turns both General called the meeting after I v.nes, ripened fruit and green conferring via phone with fruir into a blackened, rotting Henri Spaak of Belgium, assem- condition, is without remedy, bly president, who attended the agricultural experts announced, ministers' meeting in Paris. jand is caused by the prolonged Cordier said Lie was advised] rain of August. that Russia China and France Many gardeners report had given full support to the postponement plan and that the tnelr tomato UP until last United States and Great Britain "eek fa'r thcavy' "ovf a total had agreed to go along if the lcss and that the black decision was approved by all struck almost overnight, the 51 nations. Experienced gardeners say that Indications were that Lie the blight on tomatoes here is would order early member-' W0r3e than any year back to ship poll which, because of dis- h tv, paralysis were reported today by immediately made arrangements tances and communications in-1 "T y 10 there was chairman of the Board of Health, I for his transfer to the Balch "Dt Dr Ernest J. Fraser, and botn have beeii removed to the Balch wing for treatment yesterday af- ternoon. child apparently was unharmed. Manchester for 1he special polio wing of the Elliot hospital at I Barbara Thibodeau, two year a unaffected in New England the disease. (Associated Press) and CIO seamen, stevedores, men held up James J. Greatest shipping strike in the toasters and other maritime manager of the Morgan ina history continued Us workers, reiteiated late sales last blow your head off." Walsh handed them a bag was carrying and they fled in an i truce was given up by a Labor mediator in San CADILLAC E T Be Trailer Wise Hove One of Our Vj Ton BANTAM H. C. LINTOTT 25 Main St. Tel. 77 O L D S M O B I E spected by another AFL Page 5 Laundry Service, Inc. in front of strangulation of international night that his men would not re- his office foday and demanded: commerce and many to until wage cuts "Give us that bag or we will'' industries today after hope for DX War Stabilization Board aic scrapped. Lundeberg, president of the __ striking Sailors Union of the Pa- automobile." Harrv Lundeberg, leader and the Seafarers Interna- The bag contained two bank the striking AFL seamen' tlorlal Union, said in a radio notes and some unimportant whose picket lines are being re- WORST US business papers but no cash. 1 E V R O Portable Heater New design elec- tric heater. Quick heating. Fine for heating small rooms. 1320 watts. TEL. 3910 3911 186 MAIN ST. Superior Couri Justice Boston, Sept 9 D. O'Brien ol Northampton was in- ducted today as a Massachusetts Sjpenor court justice. Chief Justice John P. Higgins and several other jurists were on the bench during the ceremony, a Tiong them William A. Burns Farnsworth Brother Kill led In Plane Cirash Coudersport, Pa, Sept 9 Lincoln Farnsworth, 31, brother of television pioneer PhiJo T. Farnsworth, was recovering to- day from injuries suffered in a plane crash that killed another brother, Carl Farnsworth, 35, of Fryeburg, Me. Coudersport hospital officials said Lincoln's injuries were not treatment. They are respectively the fifth and sixth cases reported herd and bring the state score 1 up to a total of 91. Ralph Currier, 7, son of Mr and Mrs Ralph Currier of 5 Beech st, .was diagnosed Sunday as hav-iTWO MORE old daughter of Mr and Mrs Hampey Thibodeau of 6 Maple ot ill only a short time, was also diagnosed late yesterday as hav- ing polio and tho Health Board also made arrangements for the LIE AND STAFF Page 5 tot to be transferred to the Page 5 serious. State Policeman Marvin R. Wilson, said Carl was piloting the plane and attempted a forc- ed landing to avoid a heavy cloud formation. In landing, the plane's undergear hit a power line and the craft plunged to earth, trapping Carl and Lincoln in the wreckage, from which they were later extricated. Carl is survived by his widow and four children. His brother Philo, of Brownfield, Me, devel- oped the first television tube, of Pittsfiold, George Leary of and founded the Farnsworth Tel- FIRE, AUTOMOBILE and other lines of coverage James B. Crowley INSURANCE AGENCY WIU4AM F. SUUJVAM Agent TEL. 171 Meda-St Knhao, H. B. USED CARS WANTED We pay OPA ceUing prices Mercer Bros. Oarage Co. MAIN 8T. Elt. 1814 TEL. 614 Springfield and Raoul H. Beau- dreau. Wards 74th Anniversary Sale starts Wednesday! Look for the-big ten-page cir- cular being delivered, to your door today! Many exciting iralues in every department in the store! evision and Radio Corporation, Fort Wayne, Ind. Republicans Apparently Hold Edge in Maine Election (Associated Press) Maine voters harvest the first fruits of the Congressional cam paign today with a general elec tion in which the Republicans appear to hold the edge foi senator, governor and three rep- resentatives. Nominating conventions ano primaries in Connecticut, Colo- rado, Louisiana and Rhode Is- land make up the remainder of 2429-R: DRIVING INSTRUCTION Da It the Safe Way AUTO SCHOOL OF N. H. 15 Park St., Nashua, Tel. 2429-R the week's major political at- tractions. In Maine, Senator Owen Brew- ster (R) is bidding for a six- year extension to the congres- sional career he began with his election to the House 12 years ago tomorrow. After three terms in the House, Brewster is com- pleting his first Senate term. A victory for him over Peter M. MacDonald, former Democra- BE PUBLICANS page 5 volved, might require several days. Those members available in Paris and here will be cir-1 Suirounding towns also report tomato blight in varying degrees and farmers predicted prices on tins staple fruit will skyrocket because of the small supply and big demand for canning. Grant Recess In Cannibalism Trial of Japs Guam, Sept 9 UP) United Sta-e Military Commission today granted a five-day adjournment in the war crimes trial of 14 J.ip.anese charged with eating the flesh of murdered American Troopship Underway After Being Grounded San Francisco, Sept 9 Bardstown Victory, grounded for several hours on one of the Fa- rallori islands off the Golden Gate, radioed at am today, that she was underway to port. The Coast Guard said the vic- tory ship, loaded with j troops, messaged that her en-j wai prisoners on Chichi Tirna, in gine room was partly flooded but: the Benin islands, during the that she did not need assistance. The vessel, operated by the United Fruit Company and bound from Yokohama to San Francisco, ran aground in heavy fog. The rocky Farallons are last year of the war. The defense asked time to stu- dy prosecution testimony devel- oped during 20 days of hearings, and to bring two additional wit- nesses from Japan. about 25 miles west of the en-j Defendants include Lt Gen Yo- trance to the San Francisco har- shio Tachibana and Vice Adm bor. Kunzio Mori. FURNITURE MOVING RESPONSIBLE BONDED INSURED _ ANYWHERE IN NEW HAMPSHIRE OR MASSACHUSETTS LOCAL AND MEW HAMPSHIRE GENERAL TRUCKING 168 MAIN COBLEIGH HOWE 772 INSURANCE FIRE AUTOMOBILE st C. I. SP ALDING CO. Itoomi Odd rellowt Beratw TeL 286 NIGHT SCHOOL SEPT. 16 Make your evenings count at Nashua Business College. College Office open every eve ning this week for registrations. VETERANS ENROLLED under GI Bill of Rights NASHUA BUSINESS COLLEGE Approved by the National Council of Business Schools   

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