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Reno Evening Gazette: Wednesday, December 3, 1890 - Page 1

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   Reno Evening Gazette (Newspaper) - December 3, 1890, Reno, Nevada                                Reno Gazette Has the beet Eastoin and Coast Telegraph Report of any paper between San Jb rancisco and 3alt Lake. A Look at the Gazette Will convince unyouo of ita superior excellence as a newspaper. vol. xxx. RENO, WASHOE COUNTY, NEVAJXA, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1890. .NO. 54. Election Bill Under Discussion. OFFICERS KILL A MURDERER, Congressman Killed by Fall- ing in an Elevator Shaft A. "Wealthy Widow Gauged And Bobbed. natters. By Aiuociated Press.] WASHINGTON, Dec. 3. In peseuting a petition for an amendment to the Tariff bill in relation to a rebate on manufactured tobacco, Allison said the confereen on the part of both houses agreed to that section of the bill, but it had omitted in tho enrollment. He had no doubt the matter would recoive early attention. Cullom introduced a bill to reduce letter postage to one cent. Referred. An interesting discussion took place on the subject of the threatened In- dian war apropos of the joint resolu- tion to issue arms to the States of North and South Dakota and Ne- braska, Voorliecs having charged that the situation is due to the fact of the Indians being starved, and is being replied to by Dawea and Pierce. The debute at 2 o'clock on the Elec- tion bill is coming up us unfinished business. Hoar, who is in charge of the bill, said that, in view of tho fact that on reporting tho bill at the close of the last session he had addressed the Sen- ate on it, he would now forego any opening of the debate, but would an- swer whatever objections that have been made to the bill on the Demo- cratic side. Turpie opened the discussion in op- position. The debate on the Copyright bill lasted until 2 o'clock. The bill was then passed yeas 139, nays 05. Honvwhat Firmer. By Associated Press 1 NEW Dec. Stocks were quiet at the opening and prices higher, Union Pacific aud.Atctiison being the moat active. A weakness was devel- oped and the advances were lost. The sugar trusts lost three-fourths, but a firmer tone was then developed, when sugar refineries advanced from to 59 and sugar trusts to 57. At It o'clock toe list wan generally strcng and slightly above tho first prices. After 11 o'clock the sugar refineries were the principal feature, and after a further advance to 60, certificates fell dftvay to 57% and the receipts from 57% to The general list spmpa- thized in tho decline and the market became vgry dull and stagnant. Pt >cks closed dull and weak at about the lowest figures of tlw day. Railroad By Associated Press 1 NKW YORK, Dec. C. P. Hunting- ton, President of the Southern Pacific, has issued a call for a meeting of rail- road officials and bankers identified with railroad interests. Ho states that no agreement has been made or signed, and there is no information in regard to the purpose of the meeting contained in the paper. It is simply a call for a meeting, and nothing more. No meeting or conference haa- yet been held, and no result reached in regard to the formqtion of a new association, although (he street is flooded with schemes and agreements which it is asserted have been consummated. Nfcot by Kobbera. By Associated Press.! CHARLESTON (W. Dec. 3. Yesterday robbers entered the house of Mrs. Carey, a wealthy widow resid- ing at Sen ell, took her-Lrom her bed, boitnd and gagged her, urxt secured Thu two robbers were sub- sequently captured, but soon after escaped, and, in an exchange of shots that followed, n man by tlifi name of Mason was shot dead. A Hardrrer Killed by Oflleeiti. By Associated Press, i WILUAUCTOWN Dec. Last evening George Burgess, a saloon- keeper, fhot and fatally wounded Alice McKinley, and then barricaded himself in bis saloon. The Sheriff and a deputy marshal! broke down tlie door, and a fusilade followed end- ing with the death of Burge.-s. former Mentcaeed. By Associated Press.] NKW YORK, Dec. A. H. Smith, a member of the firm of Mills, Bobeson Smith, bankers and brokers, was to-day sentenced to seventeen years' imprisonment in the State Prison for forgvy. The Parnell (location. By Cable and Associated Press.) LONDON. Dec. meeting of the Irish Nationalists to further con- sider Parnell's leadership re-assem- bled at 2 o'clock this afternoon. During the proceedings ParneU an- nounced that the Sergeant-at-Arms of the House of Commons had granted the Irish members use of a com- mittee room until 7 o'clock. Healy disputed that official's right to determine the length of their delib- erations, and desired that he be noti- fied to that effect. Parnell declared the proposed mes- sage important. Objection was raisad to telegrams from individuals 'being received'during tbe proceedings. Dur- ing the discussion a telegram personal to Parnell was read. Sexton said he would persist to the end in his opposition to Parnell, de- spite the ruffiianly attacks made upon him. Dispatches from C'.onmel were read declaring the tenants on the Smith Barry estate, with Dillon and O'Brien, in opposition to Parnell. Telegrams from the Belfast branch of the National league were read, one of which declared its members would have no leader but Parnell. Sexton, who represented the western division of Belfast, aaid if the opinion of the Belfast nationalists was con- trary to his he would resign. Clancy said he had a proposal to make, which he hoped would induce a solution of the difficulty. A conversation ensued, which re- sulted in an adjournment until to- morrow, when it is expected a com- promise will be arranged which will lead to entirely new developments. Clancy's motion involved the tem- porary retirement of Parnell, subject to certain conditions being exacted from Gladstone in connection with his promised home rule scheme. Clancy's proposal has raised a hope among the Nationalists that a unanimous settle- ment can be effected. The Liberal circles, however, do not share in the hope, the attitude and front of the Opposition regarding Parnell being resolute and unyielding. DUBLIN, Dec. Board of Poor Law Guardians passed a vote of con- fidence in Paruell. The Poor Law Guardians of Strokes- town, Carrick and Boyle have with- drawn their confidence in Parnell. The Town Council of Maryborough adopted resolutions supporting Par- nell. The opinion of the National- ists in County Tyrone in favor of Par- nell is growing stronger. Rey- nolds, who represents the eastern di- vision of that county, and Matthew Kinney, who represents the middle division, have been summoned by their constituents to resign if they do not support Purnell. COKK, Dec. Nationalist members of the Municipal Council of Cork to resolution expressing confidence in Parnell, and urging him not to recognize any ad- verse uct ion by his opponents. Tbe resolution passed after a very hot and noisy debate. The Catholic Bishop of Elphin, county Roecomunon, called upon Parnell to resign. A Kail are. By Associated Press.] NEW YORK, Dec. evening papers say at the regular auction sale of teas to-day Richard M. Montgomery Co. announced that their firm was in course of liquidation, owing to the late financial stringency, and had been put into the hands of a receiver. It was further announced that a stock be called the Richard M. Montgomery Auction Company, is to be organized. Montgomery said the creditors are entirely satisfied with the arrangement. George S. Coe, President of the American Exchange National Bank, is receiver. Richard M. Montgomery Co. were the largest brokers in. the tea trade, f Alabama Minera' Bv Auoctatcd Press.] BIRMINGHAM Dec. 3. The striking coal miners have been joined by nearly all the men at work.- On Monday all the mines were idle, ex- cept where connteta wete worked or negsoen have been" Eight thousand miners are BOW 'kjle, and tbe indications are that the struggle be a long and bitter one. Nearly half the furnaces in this district will go out of blast this week, and others will follow as soon as the stock of coke is exhausted. Millie Panhorec Acquitted. By Associated Press.] SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. trial of Millie Fanhorst, the young woman who shot and killed Samuel Goldberg several months ago, was concluded to-day, and jory rendeied a ver- dict of acqojttal. Pefendent's coun- sel made the plea that the shooting waa done in self-defense. InMantly Killed. By Associated Press.l CrucnwATi, Dec. Isaac M. Jordan accidentally fell (town an elevator shaft this morning, and was instantly killed. Troops Being Rapidly Concentrated. COLD WEATHEK IN THE EAST. A Tobacco Factory Burned and tjbss of Life. A Woman Sentenced, to Death for Murder. Indian Unchanged. By Associated Press.] WASHINGTON, Dec. 3. General Schofield received a telegram this morning saying affairs are quiet and unchanged at the Rosebud Agency. Orders were issued to-day for the First, Fifth and Seventh regiments ot infantry to proceed at once to the scene of the threatened outbreak. CHICAGO, Dec. Miles arrived from Washington this morn- ing, and it understood he will at once proceed to the scene of the disturbance among the Indians in the Northwest. He has decided to mount two infantry regiments which have been ordered to First Regiment from California and the Seventh from Den- ver The horses are being hastily got together for that purpose. CHICAGO, Dec. have been received from Washington for the en- listment of twelve hundred Indians for attachment to the various regi- ments in the neighborhood of the In- dian troubles, two troops to each cavalry regiment and two companies to each infantry. Inspection-General Heyl, of the Division of the Missouri, returned to his headquarters this morning after an absence of nearly two weeks in the Northwest. From Chicago I went to Pine said Colonel Heyl. When I reached there on the 26th I found the Indians quiet and evidently in- clined to be peaceful. No doubt the rapid concentration of troops at Pine Ridge prevented an outbreak. Many reports sent by correspondents were sensational and are working great in- jury to the settlements. Many of the settlers have sold their stock at a sac- rifice and are leaving the country. I left Pine Ridge night before last; it was snowing bard and a blizzard was blowing, which will no .doubt cool the ardor of the young braves, while the older men are pacific in disposition." OMAHA, Dec. special to the Bee from Pine Ridge says "the weather is cold and a driving storm of cutting sleet prevails The troops are hugging their camp-fires, and the indiams are freezing in their tepees. To-day Agent Royer will call call in all the Indians at the agency and give then) a big feed at the Block- house. Should the present storm continue, and particularly should there be a heavy fall of enow, the ponies of the Indians now whose hay has been stolen by the hostiles, would die of starvation. At the best, this winter will inevitably be very tough on the copperfaces who have bowed their heads to Government rule in the present instance, while their rebellious and thieving brothers are living on the fat of the land. A Fire. By Associated Press.] DETROIT, Dec. fine cut de- partment of the Scotten Tobacco Works was burned this morning. Loss, The stock was also a total loss; value unknown. Two fire- men were killed and two injured by the falling of the walls. The dead are O. G. Robinson and Patrick Coughlin. Peter Cullen and Peter Demay were seriously hurt. Six hundred girls are thrown out of employment. The loss is of which OOOwaaon. the building and the re- nmindWonthaatoclcand machinery. It was ptitiaUy insured. A Ctty JUeettoo. By Associated Press. J AHGBLEB, Dec. re- turns yesterday's municipal elec- tion show that the entire Republican ticket was elected except the City Engineer and one Library Trustee. Hazard for Mayor received a majority of -201 over Ling CDem.) and Ward The Democrats elect three Councilman and the Republi- cans six. Death By Cable and- AMOolatod PreM.1 LONDON, Dec. trial of Mrs. Nellie Pearcy for the murder of Mrs. Hogg, wife of a London porter, and her child, resulted to-day in a sentence of death. The murder was committed October 24th, when Mrs. Hogg visited Mn. Eearcy to remonstrate against the fcrttarti intimacy with Mr, Hogg. Special to the GA.zBtrr.1 SAM JOHE Dec. hundredths of an iijch of rain fell here last sight. The wasjow at noon. REDWOOD, Dec. first rain of the season fell hnndredths of an itiph. PETAI.UMA, ut the heav- iest storms for tfte past twelve months set in last night. .The wind blew a hurricane and was accompanied by a heavy rain and thunder and lightning. By this morning tUree-quar- ters inches of Tain f .il lew, making two inches for the aeiwon. The storm continues. AUBURN, Dec. commenced raining last evening and has rained steadily About one inch has fallen; for the season, about two and one-half inches. The rain was greatly needed. NORTH SAN JUAN, Dec. day afternoon rain commenced falling and a heavy rain and wind prevailed all night. The rain was very welcome. MODESTO, Dec. began fall- ing at 3 o'clock this morning and up to A.. M. of an inch bad fallen; total for the sea- son, 2.00 inches. SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. began falling again at 10 o'clock this morning. It was succeeded by sunshine, but the sky is overcrst at intervals and the weather continues threatening. The signal rervice reports that within the twenty-four hours ending nt 5 o'clock this morning, 1 62 inches of ruin had failed in San Francisco, 1 inch at Sac ramento, 1.1 at Red Bbuff, a trace t Fresno, .02 at Winnemucca and .52 at Portland. NEWMAN. Dec. commenced falling early this morning and up to 10 o'clock .47 of an inch had fallen. Dec. rainfall last night amounted to two and one-half inches. A tremendous thunder storm and hail was experienced at about 10 o'clock to-day, and it is still raining hard. HOLLIBTEB, Dec. .05 of an inch of rain fell last night, making' about two inches for the season. Plowing will begin at once in Hollister Valley, while in the southern portion of the county, where more rain has fallen, much land and sowed. A large acreage will be put into cereals, while hundreds of acres will be put out in trees and vines." SACRAMENTO, Dec. four to twelve inches of snow has fallen in the Sierra Nevadas. CHICAGO, Dec. signal service officials here say Chicago is just at the edge of a snow storm this morning, which is moving east. At Rapid City, near Rosebud agency, the thermome- ter registers above zero; at Fort Sully, above; and at Bismarck above. Defying tbe haws. By Associated Press.] CHICAGO, Dec. C. Peasley, treasurer of the Burlington Railroad, was brought into the Federal Court this afternoon for refusing to answer questions before tbe Federal Grand Jury, and hie refusal to produce the books and papers of the company. The jury is trying to discover whether the road is violating tbe Interstate Commerce law by giving certain ship- pers rebates.____________ Arrival of a Hissing Steamer. By Cable and Associated Press.] LONDON, Dec. Anchor Line steamer Ethiopia, from New York for Glasgow, concerning whose safety much anxiety has oeen felt, being several days overdue, passed Tory Island this morning with a broken shaft. The Difficulty Mettled. By Cable and Associated Press Rio JANEIRO, Dec. crisis in the Ministry arose from a dispute be- tween President Fonseca and his Cab- inet regarding the punishment of the officers of theTribuna. The difficulty has been settled. 18 TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES. Dr. Mary Walker's condition much improved. There has been no change in Dr. Baxter's condition since last nurht. Central New York was visited by the second severe- snow storm of tbe season to-day. Hln Third. Trial. Special to the GAZETTE SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. The work of obtaining a jury for the third triu' of Carl Lunguifit for tho murder of Minnie Lohse in December, 1887, began before Judge Van Reynegom to-day. In the first trial the jury dis- agreed, and in the second he was convicted of iittrder in the second degree and sentenced to thirty-four vears imprisonment, but the Supreme Court granted a new trial. j Mltver BY Associated Press.] WASHINGTON, Dec. 3. The amount silver offered the Treamiry to-c'ay was ,000. The amount pi r- chased wus OUIKM? ut from BREVITIES. Kansas and Nebraska chickens con- tiuve to pass here by the cm load til- most cliuh Mrs. D. Cburich will leave to-mor- row evening for Oakland, where she goes on a visit to relatives. In Hyman Fredrick's watch club drawings Saturday night, James Mor- ris drew the watch in club No. 1, and James O'Neil in club No. 2. Sir Thomas Hesketh came up from the city with Mr. Newlands this morn- ing, and is putting in tho day profita bly in Reno. He accompanies Mr. Newlands east in the morning. Oaiscttc Weather H'crvlre. The storm gave inches of mow this morning and nearly hulf an inch of rain. Total amount of rain and melted snow, .54 of an inch. I don't think it is over yet, for the barometer is at 24.92 low for this I think the storm will continue so long as this condition ex- ists. C. W. IKI.SII. HOUN. Virginia C ty, ICev November 29, 1890, to the wife of Frank W. Haley, a sun. Reno, Nev., December 2, 1860, to the wife of Benjamin Richardson, a daughter. AIAflKIKIK PARR In Virginia City, Nev., November 30, 1890, William Parr of Aurora, Nev., and Mies Lucy Vatilda Keely, of Virgin la Carson Cily, November Eugene Jones and Daisy Strait. Carson City, Nov. 30, 1890, George Allen and Mlwi Celia Carpenter, both of Gleubrook. DIEIK Virginia City, Nev., Nov. 30, 1800, John B. Zangerlc, a native of Alsace, aged 51 years. HAVE YOU SEEN IT? We refer to the full and comprehensive treatise on the Blood and skir Whether you are sick or well, home should have a copy. If you are well, it tells yon how to keep so. If you are sick, it tells you how to regain your health. This valuable pamphlet will be mail- ed free to applicants. THK SWIFT SPECIFIC Co., ATLANTA. OA GAIN ONE POUND A Day. A GAIN OP A POUND A DAY IN THE CASK OF A MAN WHO HAS BECOME "ALL RUN AND HAS BEGUN TO TAKE THAT REMARKABLE FLESH PRODUCER, SCOTT'S MULSION OF PURE COD LIVER OIL WITH Hypophosphites of Lime Soda IS NOTHING UNUSUAL. TlHS FEAT HAS BEEN PERFORMED OVER AND OVER AGAIN. PALATABLE AS MILK. EN- DORSED BY PHYSICIANS. SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS. AVOID SUBSTITUTIONS AND IMITATIONS. M ost Mad A Pure Cream of Tartar Superior to other known. Used in Millions Years the Standard. Delicious Cake and Pastry, Light Flaky Biscuit, Griddle Palatable and Wholesome. No other baking powder does such work. KURMSHING GOODS. HATS BOOTS AND SHOES. 1890. FALL AND WiftTER. 1891 MY STOCK OF- aadttiw For the Full nnd Winter Is now vumplctc, consisting of tho.Klnwt and Me- dium Grades ol Men's and Boy's (Ming AND FURNISHING GOODS. FINE EEAVER OVERCOATS, Clilnclitlla and Kerseys. A large assortment of Men's and Boys' Fine Wool and Merino Underwear. A. Quo lino of Men's and Boys' Wool arid Cotton Socks Largest and best lino of ELA.TS C-AJPS In the State, also a full line of JOHN B STETSON CO.'8 HATS. A Large Assortment of Men's and Boys' Suspenders. The Finest Line of Men's French Kid and Buck Gloves In tho Stale, and a full line of Wool-Lined Glovos and Mills. Tie Finest Lie of Neckwear anil -ALWAYS ON HAND.- BOOTS AND SHOES -IN ENDLKSS AT PRICES THAT DEFY COMPETITION. Custom Made Pants Always On Hand. IN BOYS' CLOTHING, We bave the finest assortment in all grades, run- ning in price from upwards. MuftH 31 to .llcafture on Notice. Country Orders will Receive Prompt Attention. JOHN- SUNDERLAND, RICHARD HERZ, HOWARD. WALTHAM ELGIN, COLUMBUS, ROCKFORD, HAMPTON And Vine 8WI8B WATCHES, AT UNIFORMLY LOW PRICES! PLAIN AND FANCY ENGRAVING, Diamond Setting and Fine Watch Repairing Are our Specialties. OVER 2O.OOO WATCHES REPAIRED IN NEVADA.________ Corner of Commercial Row an Virginia Street, Reno. Prescriptions, Pure Drugs and Chemicals, Patent Medicines, Perfumes and Toilet Ar- ticles Generally, at FRIGES. (Carefully analyzed) on draught at the fine new fountain. TAKE ADVANTAGE ........OF OUR........ CREAT PREMIUM SALE. Of our New Stock of Dry GroocLs OloaJks Prices Lower than Ever.   

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