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Reno Evening Gazette: Saturday, November 1, 1890 - Page 1

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   Reno Evening Gazette (Newspaper) - November 1, 1890, Reno, Nevada                                A iHE BEST REKoIGAZEif jsj awarded the premium by the Nevada State Fair. DO SOT 00 AWAV, From home for yistir printing. Try the GAZKTTB and have a clour conscience. VOL. XXX. RENO, WASHOE COUNTY, NEVADA, SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 1, 1890. MISCELLANEOUS. NO. 28. H. LETER, THE BON TON TAILOR, Has junt received a fine line oil Fall goods, both FRENCH AND DOMESTIC. Suits made to order cheaper than any other place in the city. A perfect fit guaranteed or 110 wile. VIRGINIA STREET. NEAR COMMERCIAL ROW, RENO, NEVADA. aosep AN AWL Two Children Thrown From a Precipice. THE WEEKLY BAKE STATEMENT. FIFTY CENTS PER WEEK. "All classes of legitimate ad- vertisements, not exceeding six lines, inserted in this column for fifty per week. Situation Wanted. AS BOOKKEEPER, SALESMAN OR office work, Permanent position de- Col. Carey Charged with Sac- rificing the French Prince Full Particulars Steamship of Yesterday's Collision. rather than large salary." For refer euce furnished as to integrity, ability, etc., address p. o. Box 511, Reuo Nev. noi'iw Loat. AWHITB SKTTKK PUP WITH BROWN spots on ears; 4 months old. Person returning it to this office will receive reward. Farniahed House to Rent, OF FIVE RUuMS, OUTHOUSES AND barn. 100 feet front and land un der cultivation tautant. Girl Wanted. DO COOKING OH A RANCH, X wages, thirty dollars per mouth. Home Per Rent. riONTAINING SEVEN ROOMS AND all modern improvements, situated on I'lnza street. Inquire ou premises, I. N. WAU.ACE. For Rent. AN KI.ICIBI.Y LOCATED DWIU.I.ING house of five rooms. Inquire of DCJ9tf J. 8. SHOEMAKER. Pin Lost. ON WKST STREET, SOUTH OK TRACK, a plainjgold safety pin. Plense leave at OAZETTK office, wi Tor Sale. mHOSK BEAUTIFUL, oil, PAINTINGS, J_ by Mrs. ulauch Hubbard, which took, the premium at the recent State Fair, arc for sale, and ou exhibition at the residence of Mrs. W. S. Bender. Commercial Row. Please call and see them. oct27wi Tor Sale. MY RESIDENCE ON SIERRA STREET immediately north of the Opera House, one of the most desirable pi ices tu town and furuislud with all modern improvements, ocidtf___________________ D. n.L.l.EN'. For Sale. Gloves, purses, pipes, books, plates, Envelopes, tablets, inks, pencils, slates, oils, perfumes, knives, shears, traps, Knzors, brushes, cosmetics, soaps, straps, Glue, needles, and a variety more. Ulegaut things at the Reno Bargain Store. ________ '3QC____________ To Let for the Winter. x APART OK, OR MY ENTIRE RESI- deuce, lurnlshed. Apply at my oitice 111 Sunderland's bullumg. ocStf DR. H. BERGSTEIN. For Sale. A PINE FAMILY CARRIAGE HORSE, phaeton and uarneis for sale very cheap. Apply at this office at once. sepiStl For Trade. A LOT OF GOOD HOKSES AMD CAT- tlu to trade for eheop. Apply at this utUce. sepiStf Choice Residence Property FOR SALE, ONE HALF MILE FROM the Railroad Depot and one-fourth mile Irotn theSute University. Wattr with the property. If you wish to make a home come and see me. B. K. LEETE. Fine and aO TO H. K. tAVOLA FOR FINE MENh ladles and cliildreus boots and shoes. 1-ine custom work a specialty, repairing neatly done. septltf Ladles Remember r I'HAT MRS. b. C. JUDD CARRIES THOSE JL beautiful fitting Madame McCabe Cor- sets, the Kerris Waists, Rawlmgs' Shoulder Braces, White House Cook Book and Stanley's Atrica. Call and examine the goods. Residence doors north Opera House Brooklns' Steam Candy Factory fltHK FIRST CA.NJDX i'AUl'OUY lt> JL Reno, fresh candy every hour. Call anc get prices of small quantities or by the barrel. Wholesale prices same as San Francisco. )ai4tf C. J. BROOK1NS. Ttr Sale. WINDOW WEIGHTS ALWAYS ON hand and for sale at the mchutt UNION IRON WORKS. To the Public. A LL ANNOUNCEMENTS OF SPEECHES A to be delivered by Dr. H. IL un Her the Kuspices of the Wushoe County Dem- ocratic Central Committee nre hereby cancell- ed, and other speakers will fill the appoint nients. Any speeches delivered by the docto. are his privr te utterances and are neither en- dorsed not authorized by the above com- mittee. By order, H. BERGVTEfN, Chf inn. .11. P. H. MULCAHV, Secretary. ftM Reuo, oct. 25, 1890. BBBl A Terrible Crime. By Associated Press.] BUFFALO, Nov. of the most terrible murders ever known in the history of Erie county was committed at Akron, twenty-four miles east of this city, last night. A young woman named Sarah McMullen, aged 19, re- siding with Mrs. Patrick Brown, en- atthe ticed Delia Brown, aged 6, and Nellie May Connors, aged 10, onto the Akron cemant works' narrow-gauge-road bridge, which is 65 feet above Murder creek, when all of a sudden she pushed Delia Brown over the side of the bridge, and then grabbed Nellie Con- nors and hurled her from the preci- pice. Nellie was instantly killed, and little Delia Brown had her arms and legs broken, and, although terribly bruised, it is thought she will recover. 'Last night the citizens searched for the missing girls and found them at 2 o'clock this morning. For several hours Delia laid on the stunes at the side of the creek unable to move. It is believed that Sarah McMullen is crazy, as she subsequently threw her- self into the stream from which she was rescued by a man passing at the time. She is in custody, but refuses to talk.________ ________ They Die Hard. By Associated Press.J CINCINNATI, Nov. new board of city officers went to their office a little earlier than the usual time for meeting this morning, accompanied by the Mayor. The office.was locked, and there was only a clerk within.who on the request of the Mayor to open the door refused to do so. The Mayor directed an officer to force an entrance, and three kicks from a policeman's brogan opened the door. The inner door, which was also locked, was opened by sending a man through the transom. The board then elected a new clerk and discharged the assist- ant, who refused to give up his book of minutes. Piesident Keemelin of the old board catne in later and began to raise objections, but when Mayor Mosby told b im ho had no right to in- terfere with tha business, he left the room. The other members of the old Board acquiesced. Tbe Old Kate. By Associated Press.] NEW YOKK, Nov. to the result of a meeting on Monday last, the increasd tariff on express matter went into effect this morning. The manager of the American Express says the rate hns simply been put back to those charged in 1888. Bank Htatement. By Associated Press.] NEW YORK, Nov. weekly bank statement shows a reserve in- crease of specie decrease, deposit decrease, The banks now hold in excess of the requirement of the 25 per cent. rule.1) Arrest of Rioters. By Cable and Associated Press.] BKRNK, Nov. arrests of rioters have been made at Lugano. It is believed the turbulent Canton of Ticino will be divided into two. Perfect A Pure Cream of Tartar Superior to every other known. Used in Millions of Years the Standard. Delirious Cake and Pastry, Light Flaky Biscuit, Griddle Cakw Palatable and Wholesome. No other baking powder docs work. Wlxty-sevea By Associated Press, i NEW YOBK, Nov. is now cer- tain that twenty-seven lives were saved from the wrecked steamer Viz- caya. Word has been received from Delaware Breakwater that eight per- sons were saved and are now there. Their names are not known. A tug was sent this morning from Sandy Hook for the seven survivors taken off by the Marshall, and noi on board that vessel. The Ceballo representatives, wb went with the tug after the seven sur vivors picked up by a pilot boat, have returned. They brought seven of th crew of the Vizcaya and one of tb schooner's crew. A dispatch received from Lewes Del., says that Second Engineer Ar thur Gueralla, Fourth Engineer Leo- pold Mediaralla, the boatswain, cook a fireman and two sailors had arrivec there, and also that the body of the stewardess of the Vizcaya had come ashore. Second mate Walker of the schooner Cornelius Hargraves gives the follow- ing account of the collision: "I had just came on deck a few minutes be- fore i.Thursday when I saw the Vizcaya five miles off. A green light shone on her port side. I did not feel the least uneasy, as our lights were burning and must have been plainly visible to those on board the Spaniard. We were sailing at the rate of eight knots an hour. The Spanish ship -was moving rapidly, and I turned a flare of light to show him a sailing vessel was near, but he held on his way, and I began to think we might strike him or he us if of us did not alter our course. I was in charge of the deck, but finally called the Captain, When he came on deck he looked at the cloud of canvas on the Spanish steamship atid then at our sails, all of which were set. We can clear her, I he said, and we held on our way. I watched the vessels drawing nearer, and finally ventured, 'I think we will strike them, Captain.' 'Yes, by God, we will. Hard-a-port! shout- ed. Bat it was too late. Like a race horse our vessel darted forward and we struck the Vizcaya amid ship. The Hargraves tore a great hole the Spaniard's side, and then the vessel swung slowly about until almoct side by side, and then a chorus of ago- nized cries burst forth and men and women darted hither and thither on the steamship and jumped down on our decks, but our ship was as seri- ously wounded as their own. "As Captain Allen heard the panic- stricken paople dropping on our deck he shouted to me: 'Walker, keep them back; let's save our own crew first. To the boats, men, to the and he himself Jcut away the fastenings of the long beat and jumped in, and the first mate and three of our crew followed. "In the meantime I was fighting a gang of Spaniards bent on getting into our boats. Suddenly I looked around and saw Allen shove off with four companions. His boat would have easily carried sixteen. I jumped into the rigging and shouted 'Captain, you are not going to desert your sec- ond mate, are you? For God's sake come back.' He shouted something in reply and I saw him waiving his hand in farewell and (knew the cow- ard had made off, leaving the rest of his crew to Walker then told in a dramatic way of the struggles for life of the remain- ing ten men of the Hargraves' crew, and the crowd of Spaniards from the Viscaya. Walker threw a plank over- board and followed it, a large number of persons clung to it, and it was cap- sized again and again, each time los- ing some of its freight of human life. Finally the number was reduced to five. They lost strength gradually, and one by one let go and sunk into the depths leaving Walker alone. Again and again he was washed over- board, but straggled back. He was fast losing his mind and conscious- ness when he saw Barnegat, and tried to paddle toward it, but drifted out to sea. Many vessels passed, but were too far away to see his signals. At 4 A. M. he fell in with a Spaniard who had a raft of spars and joined him, and soon after they were picked up by a tug. Total number rescued, 42; lost, 67. LEWES Nov. sur- vivors of the collision of the steamer Vizcaya and the schooner Cornelius Hargravo were brought here last night. The following is a list of their names: From the Cornelius tain J. F. Allen of Fall Eiver, First Mate H. C. Perring of Philadelphia, and seamen Andrew Hansen of Bos- ton, John Smith of England, George Durand of Philadelphia, John Ander- son of Boston, Thorald Tboraldson of Norway, Harvey Gainer of Philadel- phia, Hans M. Holm sen of Christiana, Norway. From the Gerald of San lander, Leopoldo Gediavilla of Cadiz. Angelo Eseandon of Santunder, Leandro Galcia of Bilbao, Calba of Ponteverdera, Alonza Bartcla of Cadiz, Ramon Camana of Corona. A Cowardly Mmrder. By Associated Press.] AI.BUQCKBQOK (N. Nov. Joseph Lewis, a cowboy of Apache county, was shot and instantly killed on Wednesday nigbt by James Pipkin and Joseph Hatch. Pipkin's wife had left him, and in company with Lewis and another woman, was on her way to St. Johns. The two men followed the party, and, coming up to where Lewis and the women were in camp, they emptied the contents of their double-barrelled shotguns into the body of the man. The murderers then fled, but when the news was reported to the Sheriff, he set out w ith a posse of citizens 'and Deputies Hart and Ashton to run down murderers. Both Pipkin ttfcvfc' killed men before. Overland By Associated Press.] Nov. severance of the relations between the Union Pa- cific road and its eastern connections, except the Chicago Northwestern road, in the matter of billing freight through, went into effect to-day. Freight, wherever it is possible, is being forwarded by other routes. When not, it is billed only to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where it must be re- silled over the Union Pacific. This >reak applies to and from points be- tween Omaha and Salt Lake and does not extend to coast freight. Consulta- ions are going on between the offi- cials, and the rupture may ba mended. A Man VranrlHro lluuttclde. Special to the GAZKTTE.] SAN FRANCICC-O, Nov. 2 o'clock this morning the Coroner wan notified that a murder had been mitted on the corner of fourteenth and Mission and a deputy was sent to investigate the matter. Jtha Bo wen, a waiter in tlio Exte'sior Res- taurant, was Btulibod and almost in- stantly killed by F. C. Beck, a waiter employed in the New Eastern Hotel. The killing occurred in a saloon, and was the outcome of a dispute over a a ten-cent drink. Bowen was in the left breast, and expired in a few minutes. Beck was placed under ar- rest, charged with murder.. Kl'KMSIIlNG GOODS, HATS BOOTS SHOKS. 1890. FALL AND WINTER. 1891. A Town Burned. By Associated Press.] PEOIUA Nov. business portion of the town of Chillicothe war- Imost entirely destroyed by fire last ight. The tire originated ia a livery table, and spread rapidly in all direc- tions. The telegraph and telephone offices were burned, and all communi- cations are cut off. The loss is about only partially insured. The buildings burned were mostly small stores, saloons and shops. Between thirty and forty buildings in all were totally destroyed. Dlalne la Philadelphia. By Associated Press.] PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 1. Secretary Elaine arrived from Washington this afternoon and he received a great ovation. Later in the afternoon he appeared on the stage of the Academy of Music to address a Republican mass-meeting. The SpTBlousfcuildihg was crowded to the doors and hun- dreds were Unable to gain admission. Chicago. By Associated Press. J CHICAGO, Nov. 1. The big packers of Armour, Swift Morris have just purchased acres of land at the foot of Lake Michigan, across the line in Indiana, and will move their estab- lishments there. It is expected that people will ba moved there inside of five years. Corner Stone Ceremonlen. By Associated Press.] CHICAGO, Nov. The corner-stone of the Great Temple of the National Woinens' Christian Temperance Union was laid this afternoon with ap- propriate ceremonies. The building will be of granite, fifteen stories high, and will cost Francis E. Willard delivered the principal ad- dress. Burned to Death. By Associated Press.] GLENWOOD Nov. The Lake House, at Starbuck, was burned last night. Two children of the pro- prietor, E. P. Byhee, were burned to death, and two others were so badly burned that they are not expected to live. __ Not at All Probable. By Cable and Associated PARIS, Nov. Count Harrise's life of the Prince Imperial, published yesterday, insinuates that Lieut. Carey was a political agent paid to get rid of the Prince in Zoluland. The Official Hejtort. By Cable and Associated PrejsjJ ZANZIBAR, Nov. The official report states the British loss at the storming of Vitu, were four wounded, and the native loss was fifty killed, and many wounded." CO A ST DISPATCHES. A Campaign Accident. By Associated Press.] BAKEBSPIELD, Noy. 1. While firing a salute in honor of ex-Governor Stan- ford last night, Milo G. Mckee and John Hart were injured by the pre- mature discbargeof acannon. McKee bad both arms blown off, his face and head lacerated, 'and his eyesight de- stroyed. He is believed to be fatally injured. He is a plumber and tinner by trade. Hart was not seriously hurt. _ ___ A KeorgaaUed Bank. By Associated Press.] MARYSVILUB, NOT. 1. 'well- known and long established banking bouse of Bideout Smith has incor- porated under the name of the Hideout Bank, with N. D. Rideotit as Presi- dent. The old firm begun business here in 1861. Special to the GAZBTTK.I PORT TOWNSEND, Nov. 1. The Bteamer Walla Walla, which had not been heard from since Wedneiday night, when she lef1 Nanaimo for sea, arrived last evening. Owing to a thick fog Captain Wallace had an- chored his ship in St. George's Chan- nel. She leaves for San Francisco to-day. The steamer Haitian Kepubliceame off the beach near Point Wilson, where she went during a fog, but sus- tained no injury, and is now on her way to San Francisco. the Worst of Ic. Special to the GAZETTE] MoDKb-ro Nov. morn- ing Seuton Poren was shot in the leg and beat over the head at Turlock by officer Spiers, while resisting arrest. Boren had been drunk and quarrel- some all night, and when the officer j ittempted to arrest him he fortilied himself behind a bar and commenced a fusillade of glasses and tumblers upon the officer. Boren was brought to the county hospital, where his in- juries were pronounced not fatal. Spiers under arrest. IHert a Itroken Heart. By Associated Press.] FUKSNO, Nov. J. L. Still- man, wife of the murderer of J. Fiske, died at the County Hospital this morning. She bemoaned to the ast the desperate act of her husband, and gradually expired from a loss of vitality. She leaves two small chil- dren. Stillman had not been in- tormed of the death of his wife up to a late hour. MY STOCK OK------- Fo Fall and Winter Is now compU-tc, conalstlitx of and Mr- ilium lien's and Boy's Clothiog, AND FURNISHING GOODS. FINE BEAVER OVERCOATS, Chinchilla and Kerseys. A lurge assortment of Men 'a anil Boys' Fine Wool and Merino Underwear. A line line of Men's nnd Hoys' Wool and Cotton Socks Largest and best line of In the State, also a full lino of JOHN U. STETSON to CO.'S HATS. A Large Assortment of Men's and Boys' Suspenders. The f inest Line of Men's French Kid and Buck Gloves In the State, s.nd a full line of Wool-Lined Gloves nnd MiUs. Finest Un of Hwear ALWAYS ON HAND.- BOOTS AND SHOES Oploi By Associated Press.] SEATTLE, Nov. States luatoms Searchers Todd and Woodby seized 240 five-tael cans of prepared opium on the pteamer Olympian, which arrived at 1'ort Townsend from Victoria, 'B. C. Night watchman Adams was arrcBted on suspicion. Went In Mis ItCMlgaatlon. By Associated Press.] OLTMPIA Nov. F. Gowey, ex-Mayor of this city, who was recently appointed United States Consul to Tokio, Japan, has sent his resignation to the President on account of Ill-health. Gowey is now in Cali- fornia for the benefit of his health. IN KNDLKSS VARIETY, DEFY COMPETITION. AT PKICES THAT Custom Made Pants Always On Hand. IN Wo bavo the finest nssortmont in all grades, run- ning in price from upwards. NutlG to .iiraHore on MhorteHt Kotlrc. The Meattle Water Works. By Associated Press.] SEATTLE, Nov. Spring Hill Water Company has turned over its water works, and hereafter they will be operated by the city. Tho pur- chase price was TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES. ouniry Orders will Receive Prompt Attention. JOHN SUNDERLAND, TAKE ADVANTAGE ........OF OUR........ ORE AT PREMIUM SALE. Of onr New Stock of Dry Groods Oloa ks Prices Lower than Ever. says the Liverpool Bar silver, A Ncsv York dispatch Comte de Paris sailed for to-day. A dispatch sitys the President leaves for Indianapolis on Monday to vote. _ Public Francis G. Newlands, K. L. Fulton and the candidates will addrcHH the people to-night at Armory Hall on the political issues of the day. C. D. Van Duzen and F. If. Norcross will also address the Young Menu' Bepub'icao Club at the same place._____ Bacltlem's Arnica Halve. The best salve in the world for cuts, bruises ores, ulcers, salt rheum, fever sores, chnppe hr ids, chilblains, corns all skin eruptions and positively cures pltn or BO pay required. It is guaranteed to give satisfaction, or money refunded. Pi'ce cents per box. Ho by Wm.Pinnls'er. 
                            

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