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Reno Evening Gazette: Tuesday, August 12, 1890 - Page 1

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   Reno Evening Gazette (Newspaper) - August 12, 1890, Reno, Nevada                                JOB WORK The Neatest, The Best, At the Gazette Office. LOPES Cheaper than VOL. XXIX. RENO, 'WASHOE COUNTY, NEVADA, TUESDAY; AUGUST MISCELLANEOUS. GRAND ARMY. POWDER Absolutely Pure. A cream of .tartar batting powdm Highest of ail'JrrtpftVgnltJR Strength Usft: Government Rf-aart, Aug. Largest Military Gath- ering Seen in Boston. TROUBLE IX TURKEY IN ASIA. The Hungarian Crops Ruined by Floods. 6, Frost in Manitoba-and the IjTortfeWeat. ANNOUNCEMENTS. car's inserted under this Cot payable in adv.mce. Short Term Commissioner. WM. ANNOUNCES HIMSKI.F a-, a candidate for Short Term Com- miiMoner subject to the decision of the Ke- public.i" County Convention. For Commissioner. EW I'ARKY HEREBY ANNOUNCES himself for the office of long term Commissioner. to the decision of the Republican County Convention. County Commissioner. AN O CONNER HKBKBY ANNOUNCES himsel. f r the offke ol County Commis- sionrr subject to the decision ol the County Convention. D County Commissioner. V. M'LAlTGHKIN HKRFIiY AN- nounccs hlmseli as a candidate for County Commissioner, subject to the decision of the'Di mociatic County Convention_______ County Clerk. HW. HIOGINS HKKBBY ANNOUNCES himself us a candidate lor County CU-rlc, subjict to decision of the Reptibli can County Convention.__________________ Foi County Clerk. IIUJKKIIY ANNOUNCK MYSELF AS A can ulate for the office of Cleric of Waslioc County, .subject to the decision ol the Republican County mug ORLANDO EVANS. Unclaimed Freight Sale. TO AU. WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. IS H i- RKBY G1VKN THAT THE iv loHowmg prouerty marked or consigned as follows now on hand at the Railway Station of the Southern Pacific Co ni Keno, Nev., having remained unclaimed Uic time required by law, will be sold at public auc- tion or. the nth day of August, liiyo, at snid railway station, nt 10 o'clock a m account of freight and storage charges, unless sootiet removed: i crate cloth rollers. A. I. Oliver, i case B, paint, J. H. Kiumaubon, i uox crocucry, Juhn A. Stroh; I carboy acid, b. Muller 8t Co., i bundle sacks, G w. Mapcs, i barrel whisky, G.Becker; a boxes personal elftcts, George Hallcr; i chair, i cu-hlon, ilaro table, Geo Bell; sewing machine, John M. t-oomcr, 6 bundle blankets, Kmiz, i bundle wall pa per; M. C Guire, i school disk, C. WGrover: i sack bedding, Jas. Andrews; 2 bandies sacks, Edntoud-'Stone, t boxed trunk, J. G. trSJr windlass or derrick, cog and piliiioo and? handles and i copper I window weight, 12 piects iron General' Freight Agent, Southern Pacific ngitio C. NOVACOVICH. H. I. BERRY. BERRY NOVACOVICU, -----Wholesale and Retail Dealers iu----- Groceries, Provisions, FINE TEAfe AND COFFEES, Fish: aid; Oysters In season. FRUITS OF ALL, KINDS, Wines, Liquors, Tobacco, Crockery. We corrv a fine assortment of KANCY GROCKRIfcS. Commercial Row, Reno, Nevada. RKMKMBKR RKMEMBHR' YOU YOU CANNOT CANNOT GET TOBWORK riHEADKR OR A NY BT tJosyORK JUHHAPKR OR ANY BETTER KTTER DONE ONK nv BY KNDIN SKN EN ENDIN AWAY FROM Tl OMK. WAV UKOM 1.1 OME. The Army Heiuonntratlon. By Associated Press BOSTON, Aug. day opened perfectly for the Grand Army demon- stration. Light clouds obscure the sun's rays; the thermometer was 67at 9 A. M., with a nice breeze. A hun- dred thousand strangers are in the city. Before 8 o'clock the roar of cannon from the fleet in the harbor announced that the Dispatch with Secretary tVacy, Vice-president Morton and General Sherman was coming up the bay, and half and hour later another salute announced its-' arrival iu the harbor. Subsequently Tracy and Mor- ton took seats on the Presidential re- viewing etaud at Gopley Square. President Httrrisott breakfasted early, and shortly before 9 o'clock re- ceived the- and State dple- gation, the party took carriages and rode over a portiotot the route of the parade to view the decorations. After thb drive, the President took a seat on the reviewing stand. During the ride the President was the recip- ient of many expresnions of good will and respect fiom the crowds along the way. Meantime the formation of the great parade proceeding on Common- wealth avenue. The Common and street adjoining were black with marching posts, while many thou- sands of witnessed their maneuvers from the public garden and every other spot in the neighbor- hood where space could be procured. The unexpected delay in the forma- tion of the column was owing to the lateness of arrival of some delegations and the difficulty of massing BO large a force in such narrow quarters. De- partments were ranged on Common- wealth Avenue in the order of senior- ity, Illinois leading and Massachusetts as the receiving department, occupying the left of the line. At all was- ready and Com- mander-In-Chief Alger with a full staff of. COO Vriounted men, escorted by the 113th Massachusetts cavalry and headed by a corps of mounted police, rode to the head of the Illinois depart- ment. The band struck up "God Bless the and at the com- mand of the- leader the greatest mili- tary street ever witnessed in Boston began its march. At 1 o'clock only six departments, those of Illinois, Wisconsin, Pennsyl- vania, Ohio, New York and Connecti- cut, had passed out of Commonwealth Avenue, and it looked as though the last departmeht would not get oft' be- fore late this afternoon. General Al- jrer reached the reviewing stand in Adams Square at p. M It is ex- pected it will require live hours for the procession to pass a given point. The Turku %lariued. By Cable and Associated Press CoNHTANTiNOPMi, Aug. conflicts have occurred between the Turks and Armenians in Aliishgerd district. It is reported that a band of young Russo-Armenian volunteers, mounted and well armed, have ap- peared at and are recruiting adherants fust. The report caused a panic among the Turkish authorities. j A Bonrbnn j By Associated Press.J j DOVER Aaz. follow- is a synopsis oP'ttte pfetform of the Democratic Covention held here to- day It arraigns the Republican Ad- ministration and Congress for reckless expenditures; denounces the action ol the Republican majority in Congress in the adoption of rules designed to cripplu (he essential powers of self- government and pave the way for arbitrary legislation; condemns the substitution for tbe high discretion of the House the autocratic power of one man; protests against the Force bill, and declares the enactment of the measure is so atrocious that it would deprive tbe State of local self-govern- that the people of Delaware indignantly, resent the menace and insult of bayonets at the colls; de- nounces MeKinley'8-tariff bill, which increases taxation, while it lessens the revenue.'strangles commerce, en liances the cost of living and of production, obstructs the enterprise of shipbuilding and tlie employment of mechanics and navigators, and piles new burdens on agriculture without giving the farmers a wider market for a single production. Prior to the assembling of the dele- gates to the Democratic State Conven- tion to-day a secret conference was held, at which were present Thomas F. Bayard, ex-Governor Stockley and Robert .J. Reynolds, the most promi- nent candidate, and a few other party leaders. The Convention was called to order at 1 p. M., and the usual committees were appointed. Reynolds was nominated for Gov- ernor on the first ballot. KGPOWDER MOST PERFECT MADE. Fromthe Professor of Chemistry, California ColUge of Pharmacy. SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 14, 1 I have made n careful analysis of a sample of Dr. Price's Cream Bakine Powder purchased bv me tn open market. The results of my analysis show that the Cream of Tartar used in its manufacture is pure and that it does notcon- tnin anv foreign such as Alum, Ammonia, Lime or other Immirlties I consider It to be pnre and wholesome, and in every y wnv a superior artic'e. W. T. ff. D. Ph. M., Ph. G. Professor ol Chemistry in the Cala. Col. of Fharm., UniYersfty of CaHtornia. The Central Strlue. By Associated Press 1 HEW YORK, Atig. the Central dejiot this morning the passen- trer trains are coining and going with all the appearance of usual regularity. A telegram to the General Manager from Syracuse Bays that order is fully restored there, and the trains are run- ning without interruption. he said, "ends the Btrike." Vic-e-Precident Webb says that ar- rangements are being completed to run freight that the road had all the men it needed now. Reports from all along the line of the New York Central indicate that tbe strike is at an end. Passenger trains are running on time between here and Albany this morning, anil the delay west of there is unimportant. All trains are leaving the Grand Cen- tral depot exactly on time, and the incoming trains are only slightly de- layed. The freight traffic bus been partially resumed, and the blockade of cars is being rapidly raised. The leaders of the strike are still defiant, and talk mysteriously about Home important move to be made, which shall allow them to retire from the fight with flying colors, upon a a..compromise -with the rait The strikers were in secret session all the mornine. They claim they have another card to play. To-Way's Races. By Associated Press.] SARATPOA, Ang. The first race, one mile, Belle Dor won, Puzzle second, Worth third. Time, The second race, one mile, Ruperta won, Lady Pulsifer second, Eminence third. Time, 1 The third race, three-quarters of a mile, Cleopatra won, Esperanza sec- ond, Bertha Campbell third. Time, 1 -.16. The fourth race, a mile and half a furlong, Lavinia Belle won, Wilfred second, Martin Russell third. Time, The fifth race, mile and a half, Sin- aloa won, Isaac Lewis second. Rancouus third. Time, 2 LIBERTY By Three San Quentin Prisoners. TERRIFIC STORMS IN COLORADO. Within OKA Ovgree or a Frost By Associated Press.] Aug. President Allen of the Manitoba Northwestern Railroad telegraphed an inquiry to the manager of the Company at Portage La Prairie, and got a reply stating that there was within one degree of a frost in the valley of Minnede, but no dam- age done to crops at any point, even the most tender vines and vegetation escaping untouched. It was stated on tbe New York and Chicago Exchanges that the frost had ruined the wheat in Manitoba and the Northwest Territory. Winning Knmbers. By Associated New- ORLEANS, Ang. The follow- ing numbers won prizes in the Louis- iana Lottery drawing'to-day No. 61176 drew No. 92811 drew No. 88871 drew ,10385 drew NOB. 74858 and .55336, drew each. Nos. 24778, 48779, 68105, 78432 and 65269 drew each. Which Destroy Much' Fruit, Wheat and Sale of the Chicago and Atlan- tic Railroad. Took Deaperate Chaoeeit. By Associated Press.] SAN QUENTIN PRISON August afternoon about 1 o'clock three convicts named Hanlon, Tnrcott and Manning, who were repairing the windmill belonging to the prison, made their escape. After refusing to iialt at the command of the guards galling guns were turned loose on :hetn. The bullets fell all around, but never struck them. When they reached the prison boundary they were challenged by vidette Porter, and they shot the horse from under him. It is supposed they are in the nrnsli half a mile from San Rafael, and it is said they have opened a fusitade on he guards who have them cornered. Nineteen guards are thoroughly search- ing the hills for them. A. Turcott, for murder, was serving a life sen- ence. He came from San Jouquin in 1884. C. Manning and Hanlon were eai-h serving 17 years for robbery com- mitted in Mendocino in 1889. SAN QUENTIN, escaped convicts, Turcott, Hanlon and Man ri- ng, after reaching a gulch near Laurel Grove, threw up a breastwork of imhs, stumps and soil around a clump of trees in a dense thicket and secured a, commanding and unpenetrable posi- ion. They stood a siege of about eighteen hours, firing at their beseig- ers.every once in a while, but not to cill. Guard Bo wen of Mendocino md the stock of bis gun shattered by a shot from their rifle, and the bones of his right forearm were broken by the bullet rebounding. After holding several negotiations with the Sheriffs, being convinced that no one was killed, and probably secur- ing some concessions, they surren- dered their Winchesters to Sheriffs Standly of Mendocino and Heuby of Marin, and were conducted to the San Quentin prison. It is srrmised that a cousin of Manning was the party who took the weapons on the prison grounds, and the officers are after him. By Associated Pre-ss. WASHINGTON, Aug. mittee on Appropriations reported a joint resolution extending until August 29th the appropriations for the support of government not provided for in the general appropriation bills already passed. In speaking of this resolution Rogers of Arkansas criticized the ruling mado by the Speaker yesterday on the point of order raised by him. The Speaker'u only reply was. "The attitude of the Speaker towards the gentleman from Aikaii'as has been consistent, that of a polito endurance of what cannot be helped." [Applause on Republican side.] The joint resolution was passed. SENATE. Hale reported back-the House bill" to extend census law so to require information to be obtained from unin- corporated express companies; passed. Edmunds, from the Judiciary Com- mittee, reported an amendment to the river and harbor bill and explained that its purpo.se to make it un- lawful to obstruct navigation in any navigable waters of the United States. Laid on the table and ordered printed. Edmunds presented a motion for a change of the rules by limiting debate on the tariff bill. Laid on the table i and ordered printed. Blair also offered a resolution for such a change of the rules as will per- mit the previous question to be moved after a proposition has been considered two days. The same disposition was IT' do of it. The tariff bill wns then taken up, the pending question being on Yest'8 amendment, offered yesterday, reduc- ing the duty on tin plates 2-10 re'nts [xjr pound to one cent, pros- e'n't rate, ard Morgan resumed his ar- gument against the increased duty us provided in the A CoiiHtltnttonul convention. By Associated Press I JACKSON Aug. 12. The Constitutional Contention assembled at noon, and was called to order by Secretary of State (jovan. S. S. Cal- houn was chosen President of the Con- vention. MoKlicry. By Cable and Associated Tress.] BUENOM AYUKS, Aug. mob attacked the residence of ex-Presidi-nt Celman and threatened to burn it. The Government placed a cordon of troops around the NO. 114. FURMSHING GOODS. HATS BOOTS ANH SHOES. My Summer Stock Is Now, Complete, Consisting of The Latest and Best Styles OF. Men's and Boys' Clothing, Underwear, Socks, Gloves, Handkerchiefs, Neckwear, All and Collars, fafe, Windsor Ties and Bade QTflAW UAtQ A LARQB OTBAtil UATO O I "Ml? HA 0 Men's, Boys O nftW ft A U All giadeu An grades and A full line of J. B. Stetson Co. FINE HATS In all grades. Bar silver, A Faithful onieer. Tn the announcement column will be seen the curd of William Merrill for short term Commissioner. Mr. Mer- rill has already served nearly four years us a Commissioner of this county, and so far as the GAZETTE knoiva, has given universal satisfac- tion, having shown himself to he a faithful and conscientious public ser- vant. "to m in Colorado. DENVER, An jr. A Bowldor, npenial says: Trie bursting of a water- spout In the mountains above this town last night caused the water tn the river to rUe to a fearful height in a vary few minutes. The cabin of W. J. King and wife, which was built on the banks of the river near Silona, was caught in the Bond and both were drowned. Tbe railroad track WRH washed away, bo that no train will be able to run for three days. Bowld- ers weighing two tons wore washed down the side of the mountains. Loveland yestertUy evening a hailstorm ruined the entire fruit, wheat and corn crops over a territory ten miles long and two Bun ver was visited ibis afternoon with a severe hailstorm, accompinled by fearful lightning, during which several people were rpndernd insensi- ble. None were fatally injured. Machinists' Strike. By Associated Press.] PrrrsBURG, Aug. The strike of the machinists for nine hours is spreading, men are now idle. The principal fight seems to be against the Westinghouse' interests. By to morrow, it is said, all the em- ployes of Westinghouse, numbering will be out. _ A Washer ethot. By Associated Fress.l CHICAGO, Aug. Dr. Sawyer, a provincial physician, was shot, prob- ably fatally, this1 afternoon by fan- clier, who claims to be a correspondent of the Chicago Horseman, It was brought about by an intimacy between the doctor and Sancher's wife. A Transfer. By Associated Press.) -INDIANAPOLIS, Ang. The Chi- cago Atlantic Railroad was sold un-( der a foreclosure to-day for to a representative of the Erie road, which thus secures an entrance into Chicago. H aural-tan K By Cable and Associated Press.] VIENNA, AUR. 12. The floods in Hungary continue, and the harvest is ruined. Many honees have collapsed and a number of lives were lobt. In Itrrrrt By AModated Press.] SEDAUA Aug. The State Convention of the Farmers and Labor- ers' State Union convened here to-day. The convention will be in secret ses- sion all day. BETTER THAN GOLD. RESTORED HER HEALTH, por 25 years I suffered from boUg, md other blood affections, taking during that lime great quantities of different medicines with- out giving mo any perceptible relief. -Friends Induced me to try 8. S. 8. It improved me from the start, and after taking several bottles, ro- itorcd my health as far its I could hope for at age, which Is now seventy-five years. MRS. S. H. LUCAS, Bowling Green, Ey. matlae on Blood and Skin Dlscasenmalledfree. "wu BPIXIFIC CO., Atlanta, Oft. A Large Assortment of Men'? and Boys' Suspenders. SUNDERLAKD'S 82 6O SHOE. MY STOCK OP BOOTS AND SHOES Is as complete as ever, consisting of Gent's Fine Hand-Sewed Boots and Shoes in all Grades, Ladies' Misses, and Children's Boots, Shoes and'Slippers- in all grades and colors. All Goods sold at the Lowest Possible Price. Ladies' and Gent's Boots and Shoes made to order; Repairing neatly done. F. LEVY BROTHER. WANTED, ON OK BEFOKE SEPT. fl'd In order to raise thia amcut we will continue, to sacrifice our elegant stood of DRY AND FANCY GOODS Rewlte of Cost! WE HIVE A SURPRISE IN STORE FOR YOU. For every dollar's worth of goods you buy of us dur- ing this sale we will give you a premium ticket, for which you can have your choice of the following: Property. I HAVE VERY DKftlRABT.K TOWN property for sale, situated iu the picas antest part or town BUILDING LOTS Suitable for dwelling? with n commanding view, can be had at tail prices. Also Choice Easiness Bloek. If you wish to speculate or be and see or address uy WM. THOMPSON. Reno PACIFIC BRSWERY, Reno Soda Works and Granite Saloon. J. GL Successor to George Becker. Beer by the Glass, or Keg at shortest Lager Beer of tbe best quality always on hancf Orders from the country receive prompt attention. Commercial How-- The newsiest, the cheapest and the Ga- zstte and Stocknjan. m Give oue of those stylish Side Combs. Glve you onc silver-plated Sugar Shtllor one Novelty Hair Pin. C 1 0 TTf'TCF'TS one diver-plated Butter .Knife, or a pair of very pre.ty 1 O Give you the choice of a fine rolled gold I.ace Pin. a pair of 16 L J. O gold front Cuff Pins, a novelty interlocking Glove Buttoner of fine gold plate or a handsome Bangle. 20 TIf KETS Cive Pin or a palr Ear OK rlTir'WTG Give you' the choice of a set ol Rogers' Tea Snoops, a beautiful L L 1 9 Lace Flu, a lovely pair of stylish handsome Necklace OK Oiveyou the choice of a set of Rogera' Knives, a pair of A A.lj L (9 fine rolled gold plate Bracelets, a very choice pair of Kar Rings or a set of Rogers' Give you the choice of a most elaborate pair of fine rolled gold Oiate Bracelets, a very stylish fine rolled gold plate KecklHceor a set of Rogers' Table Spoons. This is no Lottery. No Huinlbtig. You buy our goods cheaper than any other store in the State sell them to you, and in addition for no extra charge or expense you will receive the choice of any of the Abftve-articles according to the amount of tickets you may hold. Call tee these PREMIUM are .on exhibition in our mammoth ntore. Parties indebted to us must pay up at once and save costs,   

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