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Nevada State Journal Newspaper Archive: May 01, 1930 - Page 1

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Publication: Nevada State Journal

Location: Reno, Nevada

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   Nevada State Journal (Newspaper) - May 1, 1930, Reno, Nevada                               METAL PRICES 19 8-16; N. Y..42% 14 T. 5.50; E. St. L.... 5.40 St. Established November 23, 1870 Member of the Associated Press THE WEATHER The highest temperature re- corded yestorday In Keno 39 decrees, lowest 37. Thur.s- Uay, fair and wai'mi'r. Volume LV. No. 362. RENO, NEVADA, THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1930 Ten Pages Five Cents Moves Made All Over World to Halt Rioting N. Y. PREPARED Tokyo Is First to Report Violent Disturbance TOKYO, Thursday. May policemen were injured in a May day clash at Kawasaki, a Tokyo suburb, today. Police attempted to prevent a group of about 80 workmen, Who were carrying bamboo spears, from joining a May day sration. In the scuffle several shots were fired, allegedly by the workmen, and the two policemen wounded. Eight arrests were made. Tokyo's May day demonstration began this morning with a mass meeting at Shiba park with persons present. Ten persons were arrested before noon. Early today 200 known radicals were rounded up by the police and held in custody for the day. Housemaids Rebel; Back Door Is Out DETROIT, April Mis- tresses all over the country, take hired girl is on the warpath. Gathered at the industrial group conference of the national Y. VY. C. A. convention here to- day, those quiet girls who are known as the the "hired girl" or just plain came out from behind the ononymity of their uniforms and drew up an indictment of mistresses all over the land. No longer is the term "maid" acceptable, they say. In its place has come the "domestic cr "Miss or "Miss whatever the case may And mistresses who have their em- ployes' welfare at heart will act accordingly. Their grievances, the girls say, are these: They can't get anywhere with the stigma of "hired girl" at- tached to them forever. "Maid" isn't a whole' lot better, and is at the very bottom of the social scale. They don't like uniforms be- cause it puts them so far apart from people who employ them. They hate eating alone, as eat- ing should be a kind of social af- fair, pleasant and jolly. They haven't any place to en- tertain the boy friends. They haven't any assurance that they can have their regular Thursday evening off, and, Above all, they don't like hav- ing to use the back door. Judge Has Request for Rehearing of Matter NEW YOHK, April What with one celebration and an- other, I'nion Kciuare traditional gathering place of -New York's rad- icals, will be a busy tomor- row, but Police Cornmissoner Grover A. Whalen was so sure to- night that the city's May day will be orderly that lie directed the thousand policemen ddegrtcd to the square to go without their night- sticks. The Veterans of Foreign Wars will use the square from noon to 2 in..for a .patriotic tion or Pewcy day. following a parade from Madison square. Two Parades On An hour after they have left the communists are to take possession of the sum (I. parading thither from another East Side square for their May day demonstration. Meanwhile the socialists will hold a rally of their own at the York coliseum far up in the Bronx, which they forecast an attend- orn IK.iiOO and a celebration so peaceable than no policeman need come near. Five hun'lrc.l bluecoats will es- cort the communist parade to I'nion square, with lo emergency police trucks at close call along the line of march. The thousand clubless police will be there on all-day duty, and Com- missioner will be at Union square in person with a field tele- phone system to direct operations, il any. Arms Ban Ordered Marchers in the parade have been ordered by their com- mander not to carry arms and warned that they cannot march, if they do. Kiom 2 o'clock, when the veterans leave the square, until 3 when the communists arrive, the area will be Six men were a -rested today in two sections of York for hand- ing out or postin? communist bills calling workers tj join tomorrow's communistic Spokesmen for the international labor defense said that more than 100 persons had Tieen arrested this ivek on similar in the vicinity of Brooklyn factories. Paced with a petition by the Win- nemucca Water Users' association. which seeks a modification of the recent order that "tight" dams on the Humboldt river should not be disturbed, Judge George A. Bartlett last night in Reno said that he would "not order any dams re- moved at this time." Judge Bartlett, v. ho is presiding judg-e in the Humboldt adjudication proceedings, also said that if, as charged by the Winnemucca users, there is unlawful diversion of water being made upstream, "It i.s the duty of the state engineer to call it to the attention of the court." Receives Petition The Winnemucca petition, filed in the district court in Winnemucca, was received by Judge Bartlett yes- terday afternoon. It charges that in the Elko district with later priorities for use of water :han those in the Winnemucca dis- trict are diverting water to which they are not entitled by means of dams. A rehearing of the "tight" dam controversy with a view to modify- ing: the order recently made in Win- nemucca by Judge Bartlett. is asked. Judge Bartlett said last night that the recent hearing had convinced him that "it would not be wise at Prisoners Dig Tunnel in Attempt to Gain Entrance to Warden's Residence Public Safety Head Is Arrested on Court Order PHILADELPHIA, Mav Three hundred or more students of the University o.' Pennsylvania, rested after a fight with the police near the campus, were this morning after reprimands. They had been taken to a police station in patrol wagons. Their release was preceded by the issuance of a warrant for the arrtst of Lemuel Kchofield. director of public safety, by Magistrate John O'Malley. Magistrate O'Malley declared the diiectw had obstructed justice by refusing to r< lease 2D students on copies of the charges. Requires Bail O'Malley told Hchofleld that un- less bail was furnished he would be committed to prison. Responding to riot calls police charged into crowds of students for an "ivy week" cele- bration, forced their way into fra- ternity houses and arrested the oc- cupants, as well as those found in adjacent stores and lunch rooms. Two Wardens Killed Trying to Arrest Net Seiner SAN FRANCISCO, April Anderson, 60-year-old fisherman, shot and killed two of- ficers who sought to arrest him for illegal use of nets in the upper bay off Burlmgame early to- day and despite five bullet wounds in his own body, skippered his tiny fishing smack 10 miles to Fisher- men's wharf here to surrender. The dead: Allan G. Curry, 29. deputy state fish and game warden; Jack Burke, 48, a former game warden. Bodies Brought In First intimation of the tragedy came "when Anderson's boat yawled crazily into Fishermen's wharf tow- Ing two small boats behind. Sprawl- ed on the cabin roof were the bodies of two officers, and huddled over the wheel was Anderson, bleeding from wounds. Both lungs were punctured by revolver bullets, his right arm was shattered and there this time to order out dams which I were wounds in both his left arm and right hand. At the harbor emergency hospital Anderson said he had been fishing off Burlingame, when Curry a-nd Burke came aboard his craft and told him bo was under arrest and his nets confiscated for illegal fibb- ing. Arrested Six Times "I told them I had perfect right Among those arrested the president of the senior class, Kobcrt Barnes of Kan Luis Obispo, Cal. VIOLENCE EXPECTED THROUGHOUT EUROPE LONDON. April -Prepa- rations for toning down the- reds and pinks and other clashing hues which are expected to dominate the May day celebrations throughout Europe tomorrow have been made by police and troops in the various capitals. In general the communists, social- ists and laborites will be permitted to march and speak as long as the (Continued on Two) Sublet Your a responsible party before you leave Reno. It will bring you extra pay a part of the expense of your trip. Many desirable look for a short term Place a "Furnished ApaiWBt For Rent" Ad in the Journal Classi- fied Section, and you'll floubt- less rent the apartment imme- diately. Ask for an Art-Taker when you call Reno 4121. READ and USE JOURNAL Classified Daily Phone 4121 WASHINGTON, April Secretary Wilbur forwarded today to the budget bureau a request for appropriations to begin work on Boulder dam. This preliminary step is neces- sary before congress can be asked to enact an appropriation bill for the project. The budget request was accompanied by the signed contracts for the power to be produced at the dam. Cor many years have been part of tho system of irrigation on the river." Considers Future "If, in the be added, "it is deemed advisable to replace the dams with other control devices, the change should be made only after careful and intelligent study and not as ,i sudden emergency measure." After a telephone conversation last night with T. A. Brandon, at- torney for the Winnemucca users, Judge Barttitt with- hold decision on the petition pend ing further information. He ad- vised Brandon to secure further in- formation from the state engineer's water commissioners on the exact situation. Claims Prior The petition charged that the Klko county ranchers have priori- ties for use of water dalcd later than JS74. The state engineer re- cently directed that only users with rights prior to that year be supplied with water due to the present shortage. The amount of water al- leged to be unlawfully diverted i.s fixed in excels of 150 second feet. Judge Bartlett said last night that he had been advised by John V. Mueller, special engineer for the court, that some of the ranchers mentioned in the petition have pri- orities dating before 1874 as well as later rights. Whether these earlier rights are sufficient to give claim to the amount of water mentioned in the petition is one question that Judge Bartlett said he desired fur- ther information about. The petition, also states that the recent "tight" dam order prevents the state engineer from stopping the alleged unlawful diversion by the Elko ranchers. Judge Bartlett said last night that there is noth- ing to prevent the state engineer (Continued on Two) Boys of Wealthy Family in Holdup SEATTLE. April Kansas City youths, Wallace Posey, IS. and Stanley Preach, 19, whom police said were of well to do fami- lies and had no previous criminal records, were arraigned here yester- day on charges of robbery and probably will plead Friday. They were accused by police of holding up two stores here more than a week ago, shortly after their arrival, and robbing them of about Flood Waters Pass Crest; No Damage OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla., April waters from two rivers in northeastern Oklahoma, which today threatened Miami and Picher, tonight appeared either to have reached or passed the crest of the present high water, with no serious damage or loss of life re- ported. LOCUSTS ATTACK BUCHAREST, April immense swarm of locusts descend- ed upon Rumania today attacking acres of vineyards in the dis- trict of Kujudshuk, in the Dobruja region. WJNOF R. R. ke Step to Counter Claim Set Up by Roads to The Journal. CITY, April pat itory to countering the allcga- tloJjfi of several railroad companies m Nevada that their ope pro tha sta kin Hoi nerty is taxed at a higher rate other classes of property in the Attorney General M. A. Dis- is sending his deputy to the va- s countiesj of the state to make an Independent investigation of the situation. Tile I'nion Pacific, Western Pa- cing, Los Angeles Salt Lake and Southern Pacific railroad companies havJB filed protests with the county tax! receivers and state tax coin- mis pla< Per ties n protesting the valuation ed on their lines in Lincoln, Shing, Humbgldt and other coun- Basia fop Protest Tfie basis of their protest is that the property is assessed for taxa- tion) purposes at a percentage of its taxable valUe greatly in excess of the? percentage of taxable value systematically used and adopted throughout the state, thereby caus- ing." a gross and unjustifiable in- equality per unit of value between the taxes imposed upon general property in (he stata-and that upon the railroad property. Suits in the federal courts are ex- pected to be filed by the railroads within the next few months in an effort to secure refunds from the 1929 taxes paid under protest and to have their valuation lowered. As attorney for the state tax commission, Attorney General JJis- kin is gathering data to disprove fish where I was and I would oorPorations' contentions. not give up my new Anderson said. "We argued. Curry pulled a gun and began shooting. 1 went into the cabin anl .got.my nvolvej and shotgun. I shot back and.killed them. Then J c'ime into Han Fra Cisco." Edward L. MacAuley, in charge of fish patrols, said Anderson had been arrested six times previouslj for illegal fishing. No charges were placed against Anderson today. Chief of Police William J. Quinn said if it could be determined the. shooting took place off Burlingame Anderson would be turned over lo for prosecution. San Mateo county CHICAGO, April ty-five members of one of Chicago's big- liquor rings, credited with the production of gallons of whisky in two and a half years un- der the direction of "Scat-face Al" Capone, were indicted by the federal grand jury today. The indictment charged con- spiracy to violate the national pro- hibition act. Assistant United States District Attorney- Daniel Anderson said the center of the Web was thei Italian Importing and Mfchufactur- ing company, which -wap November 1, 1927, bv Charles Ar- gento, the Capone man, Joseph Al- manza and Frank Batwie, all ,of whom were indicted. ALASKA VOTE FOR DELEGATE JUNBAU, Alaska, April With' 26 precincts reported, 23 in southeastern Alaska and three in the Fort Gibbon district, John Rust- gard was leading Judge James Wickersham by a margin of only 73 votes for the republican nomination for delegate to congress from Alas- ka. The (Vote was 1 443 ..for Rust- .gard ana for Wickersham. Las Vegas Man Tells of Graft Asked for Jobs OAKLAND, Cal., April Ernest G. Norman, former Oakland paving promoter, now of Las Vegas, Nev., testifying for the prosecution in paving graft trial hero today said former city Commissioner William H. Parker told him "if you want work you will have to pay for it." Parker is o ntrial with Kay Lara- berson, Parker's former secretary, and John Garbutt, former paving promoter, on an Alameda county grand jury indictment jointly occus- ing them of bribery and conspiracy on connection with Oakland street paving. Norman testified to an alleged conversation in which PParker urg- ed him to get the agency for a pat- ent paving away from Fred G. Haase. He succeeded and then, he testified, Parker said he would have to "pay for it" and that he was "not in the business for his health." Cross-examination of Norman will'be by the-defense tomor- row. NEW YORK, April largest customs fine ever imposed 'in the history of the port of New York was collected today from Mrs. Robert Lv Dodge, president of the cosmetics firm of Harriet Ayer Hubbard, Inc., for bringing unde- clared jewelry and wearing appearel into the United States April 115. The penalties and duties colected totalled WAGES ARE CUT MIAMI, Ariz., April Wages of copper miners were today ordered cut, effective tomorrow, by the Miami Copper company, Inspir- ation consolidated company arid the Intcrnatiohal Smelting company. in tbatjjampafgiu. NTS HOT Eugene L. Williams, former dis- trict attorney of Washoe county a-nd Reno's first city attorney, died last night at 10 o'clock at his home, 202 Maple street, at the age of 72 years. His death-was sudden. Ke was a native of Maine and had resided in Reno lor mtiny' years, taking tin active part in municipal and county affairs. He was a mem- ber of the Masonic order, Knights of Pythias and Woodmen of the World. Surviving relatives include his widow, a daughter, Mrs. Charles D. Koeder of Reno, and a brother, George B. Williams of Kalian. PORT JEFFERSON, N. Y., April from the U. S. Texas, piloted by Lieut. Com- mander Durdan was forced down in Long Island sound, five miles west of heer today. Commander Durdan was slightly injured but his pas- senger, Aviation Machinist's mate Corking was unhurt. The ship which was returning to the Texas in New York harbor2from the naval base at Newport, R. I, developed engine trouble. The wto occupan'ts were picked up by fish- ing boats and taken to the Texas by another plane. The plane was in a sinking condition when aban- doned. CHICAGO, April Madge Woodhouse, 30, shot last night by Vernon Roberts, who said she won the title of "Miss Chicago" In a 1923 beauty .pageant, died to- day. Mrs. Martha Nixon, her half- sister, shot at the same time, re- mained In. a serious -condition. Roberts said, he became angry -with Mrs. Nixon when she'upbraid- ed him tor his attentions to her half-sister. Mrs. McCormick to Tell of Expenses April The rival republican senatorial can- didates In the recent Illinois pri- mary, Mrs. Ruth Anna McCormick, the winner, and Senator Xteneen will face each other tomorrow be- fore the senate campaign funds -committee and formally report their YOUTHFUL FLO LOSTfDESERT Due at El Paso But Fails to Arrive; Feared Down Broadway Racketeer Shot Entering Apartment NEW YORK. April Against a back-drop of silence that hid events behind the scenes, an- character was shot by assailants as he entered his early today and died in a tax.cab with several bullets in his body. Balked by the close-lipped gang- land code which reads "Tell the cops police could only theorize as to the train of events which sent two young men, guns in their hands, into an upper West Side apartment lobby in the early hours this morning to empty their pistols into the back of Harry Block, night club owner and rack- eteer. Two Theories Advanced Even Block's wife, witness of the killing and apparently conversant with, her husband's activities, could not or would not help the police. She said she had been married to Block for six years and thought he was a clothing salesman. The police were working on two theories. One was that Block was the victim of guerillas hired to put him out of the way as a reprisal for the wrecking and enforced closing of the Plantation club, a Harlem night club which opened last your in opposition to his own place, th-i Cotton club. R even go Is Hinted The. other was tha.t Block was killed as a result of his activities in (ho New Jersey beer running1 racket. Several racketeers, including I Prankie Dunn of Hoboken and "Big I Mike" Redden of name only two or the better ready have ben put out of the way in that bit of gangland activity. EL PASO, Texas, April Prank Goldnborough, who left Mid- land at 6: in p. iii., en route to El Paso on his New York-Los Angeles attempt to set u new junior trans- continental record, had not arrived in El Paso shortly before in p. in. Mountain standard lime. Midland is about -'30 mill from El Part of the territory between Mid- land and El Paso Is considered i treacherous for flying. The Sierras lie directly in the path of his pro- posed flight. Route Unknown When the Graf Zeppelin made Ms memorable flight across the t'nitnl States, it swung southward and made a crossing through a pas'.. Airplanes generally do not do this The exact route Coklsburough w ;r  men reported, lie nunminred tb.ii 400 soldiers would In1 .1) fill- ferent polnlii within tin1 w.ills ol prison tonifht (il U.CM> will used to guard (iln wire thinwn prison yard. H< 150 would be pi.u cd uiHMdr- to the walls. Ohio pomlcnti.iry's idle where turmoil raged since last week's fire was emplv to- night. ,ind inilir .itinns wei e tb.it the mutiny .-ig.iinM Warden Preston i; Thomas had born emlcd. 600 in Stockade A barbed wire si oeUade erectcil in the pri.-nn i n reatmnal grounds held (Hiii u! the insurgent convicts, nii'l the auto lieonve tag sheltered others. Two hundred or more been transferred to other Mate prisons. The lii'.k of transferring (lie "bad men" from their cell blocks to the stockade, containing tents for sleeping w.is can led out this "evcnii.it .IUM before dark Ir. striking contrast to yesterday's di order, during which two prisoner. (Continued on Page Two) in in the watch house It's Not So Much How to Buy a Car as Where to Buy It. IT'S 1CASV to buy ,i t-.ir To- day's pru es and terms put till! priceless boon ol automo- tive transport.ition w i I b i i. reach of practically everyone. Tho detail that Mends carclu) Judgment today is where to buy one. The O. K. Used Car Market offers tho best UBCd car buy in Reno every day. Special Today: 11127 Chevro- let IlondKtcr, with 1 I p o n body. Completely recondi- tioned, reflnlshed In gray duco. Equipped with 5 oxeel-< lent balloon tires; 1830 license and taxes paid. Priced at USED CAR MARKET W. Plaza, Dial 7722 NEWSPAPER!   

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