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Nevada State Journal Newspaper Archive: March 1, 1926 - Page 1

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Publication: Nevada State Journal

Location: Reno, Nevada

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   Nevada State Journal (Newspaper) - March 1, 1926, Reno, Nevada                               METAL PBICES BAR electi oly tic, spot ao4 futures HKc. spot FULL ASSOCIATED HfcSS MEWS SERVICE THE WEATHER The highest temperature recostcA yesterday was degrees, lowenl is. fair; no change In temperature. 51. NO. 306, RENO, NEVADA, jiAROH 1, 1926 FIVE CENTS SPANISH WAR VET RILLS ELKO LANDLORD Naval Officer to Attempt Flight to True Pole in Summer FLIGHT IS T BEING CONSIDERED RUNAWAY daughter of W. W. Rogers and the titled Austrian left. The count U suing for a divorce. Personnel to Be Made Up of Reserve Navy Officers and Men WASHINGTON, Feb. Manned almost entirely by volun- from the eommieaioned and enlisted rolls of the naval reserve the polar exploration expedition headed by Lieutenant Comman- der Richard E. Byrd will eail from New York late in March aboard the board steamer Chentier, hoping to blase an air route the north polo itself, sweep over wide areas never be- fore visited by man, and be baek home again before Plans for the expedition are now virtually completed, Commander Byrd said today, and assembling of the men and equipment will begin immediately. Expetlence gained by Byrd In command ot the naval planes that accompanied the Mac- Millan expedition last year has gone Into the preparations and he Is confident of success In the undertaking, which was financed by a group of Americans interested in polar explorations. 30 In Partv The Chantier H a 3500 ton lake type vessel suitable for deep sea cruising and the whole party, In- cluding the crew of the ship as well as flying personnel, will number about 30. A three-englned Fokker design plane will be used for the push northward toward the pole from ttnjra where the hop-off from the Chan tier will be made. Byrd will be accompanied on most of the flights only by Word Bennett; chief petty officer In the naval air service, and his com pan ion in more than 3000 miles of fly- ing over the Ice last year. Th% plane will carry three men, however, and another air pilot will be included in the i arty. Considers Others Commander Byrd considering George R. Pond and Fred H. Beck- er, both naval reserve lieutenants of wide flying experience with all types of planes. He will also have the services of O O. Novlllc of the Vacuum OH company, as engineer- ing expert to deal with fuel prob- Icmzs In the operation of gas en- gines at low An experienced "Ice skipper" to command the Chantier and pilot her to the Kings Bay base, and also a. man of experience in sledge work in the far north, will be se- lected from civil life, but Comman- der Byrd will get the rest of his ship's company from the 6000 en listed fleet reservists of the navy, all of whom have bad from 16 to 20 years" of active duty with the fleet before passing: into the re- serve. Assured Men He has already been assured that far more men than he can take are eager to go. Commander Byrd believes that the success of the polar explore- tion by airplane depends) on avoid- ance of landings on the ice or water. He does not expect to come down except on land in order to avoid danger from ice Should be succeed In reaching the true pole, he plans to return to Cape Jessup, the north erly tip of Greenland, and strike out again to sweep the unknown region to the northwest of the cape, where many believe an Arctic con- tinent will be found. C i I I 5 Young Couple Struck by Train While Crossing Trestle CROSSING ACCIDENTS KILL EIGHT PERSONS Counteu Salm and Count Salm (Inset) Husband of Former cent Rogers Plans Early Departure NEW YORK, Feb. 28 Count lAidwig Salm Hoogstraeten anru unced today that he and his mother will return to Europe im- mediately, leaving the count's suit against the former Millicent Rogers in the hands of his attornev. Tli" count, who arrived from Washington Saturday night, said that he was eager to get back to his tennis. He explained he in- tended to enter the Davis cup tour- naments, representing Austria, his native land. He-man B. Goodsteln, his lawyer, said he would make the sailing ar- rangements for the count and his mother tomorrow. They expect to sail within a week. The count, commenting upon his recent visit to Palm Beach, where his wife and baby are wintering, said he is "thoroughly satisfied over the legal arrangement In re- gaa-d to the child The county and Boys Hit While Standing On Track Near Depot KANSAS CITY, Mo., Feb. SB- persons were re- ported to have been killed and four injured by railroad trains in grade crossing accidents and train wrecks in the United States todsy. Three trainmen died of in- jurin suffered within the week. The most tragic of the acci- dents was at a grade erosemg near Elberton, Ga., where four small children and their mother were killed outright when a pas- eenger train struck a motor ear in which they were taking a Sunday drive. The fatner and a son were injured. At Topeka, Kans., three boys were killed by a freight-train- as they iitood on a track watching a passenger train pass. At Cincinnati, a mother, son and little daughter were killed at a grade crossing where their mo- torcar was struck by a passenger train. The husband father and a baby daughter suffered fractured skulls, and It was considered un- likely that the baby would survive. At ChHllcothe. Mjo., a boy, 17, and a girl, 19, who weer strolling along the railroad track were run down and killed by a train as they were crossing a high trestle' hear the station. Another cotiplo, a short distance Ifiem, jumped to safety just In time. A switchman died at Altus, Okla., of injuries received last week. 3p- spite the valiant efforts of a fellow trainman who, when the switchman fel beneath a train, sacrificed an arm in an effort to save him. An engineer and fireman of a passenger train who were scalded when a engine toppled after side- swiping another, died at Altoona today. TOPEKA, Kan., Feb. Three boys were killed today when struck by a Union Pacific train. They were standing on the tracks watching a passengar train go by on a parallel track and apparently did not see a freight train coming from the op- posits direction. The dead: Jaskie Parker, 10; Billie Her. men, 12, and Wilbur Smith, 9. TRAIN STRIKES TWO CHILLICOTHE, Feb. 28.- Graham, 19, and Ever- ett Dowell, 17, were killed when a Wabash train struck them as they were crossing a high trestle a mile of the ChHllcothe depot to- day. Congress Expects to Git Away From Labors in Sixty Days SENATE TO CONSIDER ELECTION Quick Action on Legislate Now Pending Is Expected WASHINGTON, Feb. Although moving along in more or -ess Isisurely fashion, congress gradually is cleaning up its slats' and should be able to get away within two months at the tatsstf The foreign debt settlements and le annual appropriation bills are le principal Items left on the c ndar outside of farm relief railroad legislation. The senate has ire; election contests to settle, tout nee these reach the floor they are ot expected to consume a great eal of time. Labor Bill Up The house is expected to pass railroad labor bjff1 omorrow, and it will be taken up n the senate In the near House leaders also have two addl- ional appropriation bills down for inal action this for Salm deported on the grounds that he become a public charge. VENDETTA TAKES LIFE IN S. F. SAN FRANCISCO. Feb. body of Charles Lista. candy store proprietor, was found in his latin quarter shop early today, the climax, police believe, of a vendetta. The man had been shot through the back. There waa no indication of burglary and officers attrilute the kining to tho same feud that has claimed two other lives in the North Beach district wit bin. the last two months. Mr. Goodsteln characterized as j A gtrolig. wtna prevented them dicumus the attempt of Represen- j from hearing, the approaching train tatlve Laguardla to -have Count] and Miss Graham were strolling along the Wabash tracks with another couple, who were, walking ahead and Jumped Just in time to avoid being run down. CROSSING SMASH CINCINNATI. O., Feb. Mrs. Edith Anders, 38, Westwood O., her son John, 14, and daughter Hazel, 32, were killed near here to- night when a Big Four passenger train struck their automobile at a grade crossing. The husband anc father, John Anders, Westwood contractor, driver of the machine and a two-year-did daughter, re- ceived fractured skulls, The baby may die. FIVE KILLED ELBERTON, Feb. Five persons were killed snd two seri-nisly injured tonight, when a Seaboard Air l4ne passenger train an automobile at Crossing near here. The dead: Mrs. W. E. Fortson. Fort son, 6: Beatrice Fortson, 4; Haiti Fortson, 11; Earl Fortson, t. The younger members of th party all were children ol Mr. ani Mrs. Fortson. Mr. Fortson told physicians aft< the crash that he stopped At th crossing to look for a train which he knew to be due. Seeing nothing of the train, he said, he proceeded to cross the tracks when the train struck them. SAN FRANCISCANS BUY LOS ANGELES HOSTELRY LOS ANGELES, Feb. James W. Flannery and assistants of San Francisco, have bought the Hotel here. Completion of the deal involving more than seo.lKM. was announced today. Sato of the hotel marks) the retirement of Holladay, Who been in the hotel business for more than CHUT GUILTY MAYOR IS PUK APPEXL SAN FRANCISCO Feb. W) Attorneys for J. H. Madden, ma- jor of Sausalito, and Joseph Pa- rente, San Francisco tailor, were to- day planning an appeal from the decision of a federal court Jury which last night convicted them ot a liquor conspiracy, involving the operation of the rum runner Prin- ciple. Immediately after the verdict was returned. Judge Partridge sentenc- ed Parente and Madden to twc years In the McNeil Island prison and fined each Ralph Ownes, San Francisco hotel man, was given a similar sentence, while Am- ado Bonacorsi and Al Hamblln were given county jail sentences of nine and three months respectively. Two other defendants were acquitted. Ownes attorney stated he would attempt to obtain a new trial tot his client. The Principle was alleged to have been operated by Madden and his assistants in bringing two cargoes of HquoT from Vancouver. WOMEN, CHILDREN ARE SAVED IN NIGHT BLAZE CHICAGO, Two women and nine children were car- ried to safety when flames de- stroyed a four-story brtofc building with a loss of rri.WO late last night One fireman collapsed in the bunding and was rescued by '------._. 100-FOOT NOSE DIVE FATAL TO AVIATOR SEATTLE, Wn., Feb. Lieutenant Alonso E. Ban Was kit led and his mechanic. Cay cincros, seriously hurt, when their airship went into a nose dive and dropped 100 feet to a concrete road way at Sandpotat field near today. Two- hundred ths accident, Stockton Men Burn to Death Beneath Overturned Automobile s MOTHER, ON SURPRISE VISIT, HEARS SAD-NEWS Wives of Dead Men Struggle Frantically to Save Mates STOCKTON, Feb. den death and injury cut short a happy early morning drivs this morning when two men were burned to death and their wives rendered unconscious as the auto- mobile in which they were riding somersaulted front end foremost and was enveloped In flames. The dead ire: Chester W. Conk- lln, member of the firm of De Your.s and Conkllng, undertakers of Stockton, and Oscar ft. Beyrle, superintendent in charge of con- struction for the Western States Gas Electric Co., also of this city. Women Saved Thrown clear of the machine whea it took its fatal plunge, Mrs. Conklln and Mrs. Beyrle escaped with minor hurts, although Mrs. Recent Utterances of For- eign Minister Bring Protests CABINET HAS LONG MEETING ON ISSUE he offices and for the Beyrle is at the emergency hospital tate, justice, commerce and laborj hysterjoaJ and from a wrenched back caused, when epartments. Muscle Shoals probably o< upy much of the time of the sen .te during the week, as leaders to have action on t louee resolution creating a co greaslonal commission to lease, reat .war-time nitrate and po on the Tennessee river. Early Action Chairman Bmpot of the finance Committee, plans to ask early uct- on on the Italian debt settlement, he only one of the six pending debt settlements on which there Is serious contest. All of these set- lements already have been ap- proved by the house. Hearings on farm relief leglsla- ion will be resumed this week by ,he house agriculture committee. The most prominent to be up is the Dickinson bill de-- signed to take care of the export surplus of the principal farm pro- duti The house already has passed the administration cooperative market- ng measure, but the senate agri- culture committee still is to hold hearings on this and several score other measures designed to aid the agriculture industry. [With, frenzied efforts she tried to [raifMi the machine and free the nten. 5th women were unconscious for ral after the accident, occurred at Hammer Lane, the Lower Sacramento two miles cast of SE Some See Possible Quitting of Post by Recently Knighted Diplomat LON DON, -Feb. dom has a British foreign min- ister found himself in such dif- ficult snd embarrassing position on an important point of Toreign policy as Sir Auiten Chamberlain, on the eve of the League of Nations meeting at Geneva for the admission of Germany to the League. The entire press, with- out distinction of party, joins in reproving his attitude on the question of the enlargement of the league eouneil. While Sir Austen maintained 'silence, he was given the benefit of the doubt on how far he might have committed himself to the French view on the admission of Poland, Spain and Brazil, but now the flood gates are loosened and friend and foe alike are loud in declaring that Great Britain can- not favor a policy which Is not only a negation of the Locarno agreement, but bad faith toward lermany. No Illusions When the English foreign secre- ary, with Lord Cecil, starts for Geneva next Friday, he can have ot illusions regarding the opinion f -his countrymen, oft the course tut ought to pursue ther.e- Only one prevails, and that is Ji at n.. The hour of.the acci- dent was shortly after two o'clock, Indicated by Conklin's watch which stopped at o'clock. Grim Sidelight A grim sidelight was thrown on the tragedy when it became known that Mrs. Katherine Beyrle, mother of the dead engineer, had made the trip trom Los Angeles Saturday night to surprise her son with her first visit In 15 years. She regis- tered at a local hotel for the night, intending to call at her son's home today. When she located the street on vhleh he lived, she inquired of some.boys if they knew where "Mr. Beyrlo lives." "He was killed last the boys Mrs. Byrle is being cared for at the home of her son. Fog Bank Met According to the sheriff's office and the report of Coroner Oscar W. Pope, the machine containing life party was proceeding along the ment of the leagus council copcur- ently with asrmany's admission, London Sunday papers chnr- aoterize coming1 week- as the moot grave and anxious time for he cabinet since the government ook office. The dissatisfaction with "the Chamberlain attitude as eflected in his recent speech reach ,d a. point where for a time It was believed only his resignation was losslble. Serious Position Apparently Sir Austen himself now realized the seriousness of his portion and has allowed it to be- come known that he considers his speech has been misinterpreted. It Is understood that Premier Baldwin will try to relieve the ten- Return of Indictments Ex- pected to Loosen Tongues of Indicted CLEVBLAND. O., Feb. A second session of the federal grand Jury investigating the al- leged nation-wide bootleg alcohol conspiracy Is expected to (be called goon alter the first recesses. The fcccond session will be called, it was indicated tonight, to Indict persons whom the Jurors do not have suf- ficient evidence against to indict now. The grand Jury will report, prob- ably Thursday, what claimed to be the biggest conspiracy Indict- ment tver drawn in this country. It will charge more than 100 defend- ants with being members of Lht plot and will net forth as many overt acts, officials said. Government officials believe that when the indictment is returned scores ot men. who have laid back hoping for things to blow over, in order to save themselves, viil make admissions which will involvo at least another 100 persons. Hammer Lane road when a fog bank was encountered. Tracks made by the death car showed that it was driven off the road gradually, finally the side of the road was reached, the gravel giving way under the rear wheels and the macntne dropping down the five- foot grade. Travelling at a fair rate of speed, the sheriff believes, whea the car left the road it hit a mud bank, stopping it suddenly, and causing the 'car to eommersault. SGOH OFF TO FACE TRIAL FOR BAN FRANCISCO, Feb. W. Scott, released from San Quentin prison yesterday to authorities of Chicago, where he Is wanted on a murder charge, left here today for the eastern city In charge cJ Detective Fendergast ol le Chicago police force. Scott 1s accused of the holdup and murder of a Chicago druggist three years ago. for which ther Russell Scott, twice faced tne gallows and finally insane. He was serving a 8" Queu- tto Mnteneet for buiglary under ot John Redding PEKING, Feb. Lu Chung-Lin, the. Peking commissioner, and General Feng Yu-Hsiang's ablest officer, has taken charge of the tasfc of stif- fening the government's fighting line with contingents of the firs Kuomlnchun, or national army which captured Tientsin. General Wu Pel-Fu, who la In. personal command of the Hupel troops, apparently Is making little progress northward. He has not ye succeeded In.canturlng Slnydnchow although he Is completing enclosure of the city and trying1 to starve out tha Honan force which is inside. BHRNARDINP, Cal.. Fob sixteenth national or ange show closed tonight. It had entertained during 11 days a crowd estimated by H. C. McAl lister, president, at 368.000 people. Plans were discussed today by exe entire committeemen to construct a wing to the present 700-foot au ditorlum in order to relieve eon gestioh. at future expositions. Th National Orange, Show is designs to exploit the cttraa fruit industry one ot Indus- ng was reac or the enlarge- Germany should of it. have been ap- STORM center following about League of policy of Great Britain. Austen Chamberlain PLU [5 STIR Officials Deny Change Made in Request Made by Dawes CHICAGO, Feb. ossi- bility of a congressional iiuostiga- of an alleged alliance between organised crime and politics in Chi- cago today loomed as a political Is- sue likely to shove the world question out of tlrst pluce in Chi- 1 Makes Demand for Money as He Opens Fire on Victim MURDERER NABBED ON STREETS BY POLICE No Motive Given for Action; Lead Pellet Hits Just Below Heart Special to The Journal. ELKO, Feb. you go- ing to pay me that de- maided John 0. Broiles as he Stumped his way on his wooden leg into the West Hotel here at 2 o'clock this afternoon. Without John Alvordi, the startled proprietor, an oppor- tunity to answer, Broiles drew a .46 caliber revolver from his pocket and shot four times. A score of oreutwnts of the hotel .obby scurried for shelter, and Alvtirdi. motally Bounded, crumpled o the floor Slaysr Nabbed Brolles then walked nonchalantly down the street where he was found _ few minutes later by officers who had been hurriedly summoned to the tcene of tho tragedy died In a hospital two hours later, i bullet having pepe- tratNl Just below the heart. When told that Alvordi had died. Brolles calmly Inflated that "If he couldn't pay his bills, he was bet- ter off dead Broiles It Vet The slayer Is a veteran ot the war and lost ono leg and a portion of his shoulder in Ihc Phllllplnes during the period. Because of bin wooden leg, ha Vice President Dnwes yesterday presented to the senate a petition of tho Chicago Better aoveinmt-nt Association nuking for nuch nn In- quiry and making the ohfurgPH. While Robert K. Crowe, state's ..t- torney, and other officials aimed at In tho petition, enlei'wl v'.goroux denials of the charges and ques- tioned the integrity of tho asKociu- tion .there wan much BpeouliUltm today in all political an to Just how broad such an Investiga- tion, if authorized, might bcoonif. Among the subjects that It was admitted might be considered woro the immigration problem, election and bootlegging. Klnce a drive was Kturled by the police frderal authorities to round up deportation alien gunmen fin I gungHterx here, there Imvo been charges that many gangsters hnve sion by a statement to parliament' been smuggled into tho country in violation of the Immigration law. .omorrow, thus allaying the rumors ot a cabinet crisis or resignation, t is doubtful, however, if he will definitely Indicate the. British policy. become Known that the cabinet discussed the question for seven Hours last Friday and that still another cabinet council will be held, probably Wednesday, before final Instructions are given to the British delegation. The Sunday Observer remarks: "Premier Baldwin has to avoid an Irreparable blow of the moral credit of the cabinet." Various political factions have made charges of ballot box stuf- fing, through the connivance of po- liticians and gangsters, and this question also might be Involved In such an Investigation which wouli not be limited in (scope, politicians said. Joseph Lombardo, whose broth- er, Anthony, is a leader of the Italian colony here, was among more than 30 pernons seized today In tho Kearch for The police declared he had been hern wince without Keeking citizenship and that he has a Jail record. Sexoral of the others seized were, held for further In- vestigation. Sheriff Peter M. Hoff- man said he will start a drive In districts outsldo Chicago to round been somewhat of character In the, vicinity of Blko for Mveral Alvordl a well-known mem- ber i.f the foretell colony here and bin nro unable to account for a motive for tho killing. Ineantty Claimed 11 In declared thai has -IIK of mentiil unbalancn at vnrioiiM times and the theory wan that Brollcs became obHOHHcd with the Idea that AUordl owed him money set vices, al- though hail not worked for Alvordl for (several In a diking statement Alvordl Kct forth that ho had been m< nev to Itruilcx for nome time liprauso lie tt.is tifrnlil of him. OK his rtciith IMM! he din-lared Im wan going t" ttlve Rrolles sorno more money today, but Hrolles dtd not plve him .1 rhanre to do be- fore opening flte SAN FHANrlSl'O. KeV. Thronlrle nays that the   As- Press. ITALIAN CARDINAL DIES IN VATICAN ROME. Feb. Cagllero died, today. waa 8S yeara old. Born at Castelnuovo d'Astl, In tha archdiocese of Turin, January 11. 18W, he was created and pro- claimed cardinal In 1911. He celo- his anniversary as a priest in Cardinal was head of the mission to 'America, and at jp alien gangsters who have as Hale nnithciV Ktoron._ Lho city while the police raiding Is in progrcHB, BOY AND GIRL GET have a third Interest In J M. Comptny. Inc. of Los Angeles, sldcs controlling O. A. Hale and Company. Hun Jone, fUle Brothers. Inc., Si.rrHmcnto, Whluhurne (swan of Oakland und Whllthomc and Hwun of Sun lY.oirlsco, trm newspaper says und will In Uie handM of the BMIIIC thit now iwn each of the units. EARLOTciEN PEG LEG BAN BERNARDINO, Cal., To determine, whether Kenneth W. Filer. 19, of South Pnn- adena, and Miss Mary Olive Tot- will, 18, of Los Angeles, scoured a marriage license by proxy. County Clerk Harry L. Allison announced _ the marriage license. Filer and ono ho Tetwlll, however, were married on lnc February 9 by the Rev. John B. The .v Toomay of Ontario. The elder Filer and Lady had previously warned county the clerk, of southern California not to issue a license. ved and foil heavily. said hThad not yet N. Physical had to b. cured information as to the identity of the young man and Neither the Karl or the woman who secured the marriage deck license in the names of the younf their cabin. ____ TREMOR FELT eounle. CUM IN WORKOUT AVALON. Cutallna Island. VMi. Chicago Cubs BO.UML' LISBON, Portugal, Feb. was complete today and It (light earthquake shock was the second week of felt here at today. The dls- tlonlng. A game which won 1 turbanoe followed several of the Tanaingf workout 4 wa.   

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