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Independent Record Newspaper Archive: September 9, 1965 - Page 1

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Location: Helena, Montana

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   Independent Record (Newspaper) - September 9, 1965, Helena, Montana                                Indian, Pakistani Battles Rage Heavy Fighting On Two Fronts, Tanks Destroyed By CONRAD FINK NEW DELHI, India (AP) Indian and Pakistani troops fought heavy engagements on two new fronts in northern and southern Pakistan today. India cloimed 75 Pakistani American destroyed in a 24-hour period. Rawalpindi, a Pakis- spokesman claimed drives were stopped But India said its forces were advancing on both fronts, in the Sialkot sector in the north and in the Gadra area 600 miles to the south, in southeast Pak- istan where it launched in- vasions Wednesday. It was understood the tough- est fighting was in the border regions of the north near the Rains Slow Harvest in Helena Area Weather, the most talked about subject by farmers and city folk alike, continues to dominate conversations in Hel- ena and especially the Helena Valley. City residents lake a dim view of the gray skies and rain but for valley ranchers the wet days of August and early Sep- tember present even grimmer prospects. They are haunted by the question of "will wo get the crops harvested." Despite a late growing season, slowed by rain in late May and June, the grain and hay crops are bountiful this year. Some fortunate ranchers already have harvested their winter and spring wheat, but many more have not, According to reports coming into the office of County Agent Jim Sargent most ranchers still have spring wheat and barley to harvest and the second cut- ting of hay to finish. Ranchers have had a very late start in the second cutting of hay and large quantities of hay already cut are still lying loose or in bales in the fields. Sargent explained that the 3965 growing season was one to two weeks behind through- out the spring and summer. The time lag became serious when August rains persisted into prime harvest days of Septem- ber. Statewide the Department of Agriculture reported harvesting of winter wheat was 85 per cent completed. Combining of spring wheat, pals and barley was 65 per cent' finished. However, in some areas of western Montana, grains have not yet ripened. Heavy frost could hurt the grain. The Helena Weather Bureau, headed by Richard Dightman, is besieged with calls concern- ing the big question, "When's Ihe rain going to stop." The best answer the bureau can come up with is "the present weather trend should continue through Saturday with some periods of clearing. Helena which has experienced almost constant rain since last Saturday still is well off from establishing a record amount of precipitation for the year. But as everyone would agree the first eight days of Septem- ber this year are much welter than for the same period in 1964. The weather bureau fig- ures confirmed this fact. Dur- (Continued on Page 8) In tani both cold. West Pakistan city of Kasur and India's city of Frezepere in Punjab. Chinese Premier Comments As the fighting raged, Pre- mier Chou En-lai of Red China loosed another blast at India and said its "massive armed attack on Pakislan" could not have been carried out without U.S. consent and support. In a speech at a reception in Peking at the North Korean Embassy, Chou stopped short of saying Red China would pro- vide concrete assistance to Pak- istan. But he reiterated firm support of the Pakistanis. Chinese Plans Cause Concern Officials in Washington and L o rt d o n were concerned lest Red China take a hand in be- half of Pakistan by starting new trouble on India's border. There were these other diplo- matic developments: Secretary General U Thant arrived in Rawalpindi, the Pakistan capital, on his mis- sion to seek a cease-fire. He said the situation was serious. Amir A b a s s Ho- veida of Iran flew into Turkey to consult with Turkish officials on Pakistan's appeal to them for military help. All three na- tions are members of the Cen- tral Treaty Organization, an anti-Communist alliance with which the United Stales is asso- ciated. 114 Tanks Destroyed An Indian communique, re- porting the claim that 114 Pak- istani tanks had been destroyed since Sept. 1, spoke in general terms of the battles. A Pakistani government spokesman claimed that Indian army, navy and air operations had been brought to "a stand- still" and Pakistani forces had made "tactical gains on all fronts including Lahore." He said Pakistan's armed forces had "stabilized" their positions on all fronts. The Indian Defense Ministry reported "fierce fighting" was (Continued on Page 8) State Toll Now 178 Missoula Man Dies in Car Crash on 'Dead Man's Curve' MISSOULA (AP) A curve in Dead Man's Gulch claimed the life of a Montana man. Allen Ray Beutlal, 24, Missou- la, was fatally injured Wednes- day night. His foreign-made car failed lo negotiate the curve about three miles south of Mis: soula on highway 93.- The Highway Patrol report said Beullal's ear knocked down several guard posts and rolled 10 feet down an embankment. Beutlal died in a Missoula hospital about two hours after Ihe 9 p.m. accident. His 19-year-old wife, Diana, was injured. She was listed in serious condition in a Missoula hospital. She received head and face cuts and possibly other in- juries. The death raised Montana 1965 traffic toll to 178. This com- pares with 184 by this date last year and 153 in the comparable period of !963. It was Missoula County's 21sl traffic faiality of the year. Lasl year the county had seven. IntopenMt Heart Vol. 255 Helena, Montana, Thursday, September 9, 1965 22 Pages, Two Sections Price Ten Centi Gulf Coast Residents Flee Path of Hurricane Betsy Miss Montana Competes Although III ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. (AP) Blonde Dianne Sue Feller, Miss Montana, competed in the Miss America swimsuit compe- tition Wednesday night with an car and throat infection. On antibiotics and under a doctor's care, Miss Feller got out of bed despite an elevated temperature and participated in the first competition of the pag- eant. Wore Turquoise Suit She graced the ramp at Con- vention Hall with her 35-23'A-35 statistics. Dianne wore a tur- quoise suit with matching pumps. Miss Montana's chaperon, Mrs. Armand Guadina of Bil- lings, Mont., said Dianne had been fighting a cold even before she left Helena, Mont., and was taking antibiotics even then. Change Blamed think that the jet flight and the change of climate from her home in the mountains to the sea level of Atlanlic City, plus all Ihe strenuous activity of the pageant week, may have lowered her resistance a Mrs. Gaudina said. Thursday night, if the upper respiratory infection does not confine her to bed, Miss Mon- tana will compete in the eve- ning gown competition. Impressed With Scholarships Mrs. Gaudina said pageant di- rector Lenore Slaughter was im- pressed over the number scholarships Dianne has won. Miss Slaughter could not re- member any other contestant having so many scholarhips, her chaperon reported. Wednesday night was parade night in Atlantic City, when everybody gets out to cheer for their favorite state beauties. Dianne, who had been looking forward to traveling down the boardwalk in the parade route, had the edge taken off this pleasure by the cold. Thousands Attend Dianne said she was amazed at the beauty of the floats anc size of the crowd estimatec in the thousands which lined the boardwalk. To look at Miss Montana, one never would have guessed she wasn't feeling well. She reeeivec a terrific ovation from the crowds along the line of march and she looked stunning in an imported Italian Brocade gown, created by her mother. Train Kills Indian BILLINGS Iron 70, a Crow Indian from St. Xa vier, was killed by a freigh train Wednesday night at the 27th Street Crossing in down town Billings. Police said Iron apparently walked into the west bound train. He was struck b; a boxcar. Blames U.S. Support Chinese Premier Condemns India War on Pakistan TOKYO (AP) Communist China's Premier Chou En-lai loday condemned "India's mas- sive armed allack on Pakislan" and said it could not have been done without the consent and support of the United States. Chou again declared Commu- nist China's firm support for Pakistan and warned "the In- dian government that it must bear full responsibility for all the consequences arising from its extended aggression." Chou, however, stopped short of saying Red China would pro- vide any form of concrete as- sistance to Pakistan. His re- marks were made at a recep- tion in Peking at the North Ko- rean Embassy and relayed by Peking Radio. Chou told the gathering mark- ing the .17lh anniversary of the founding of Communist North Korea: "U.S. imperialism stops at no evil. .Recently, India has launched a massive armed at tack on Pakistan and Pakistan has risen up in resistance. "The fighting is daily extend ing in scale. Thus a struggl between aggression and anti aggression is unfolding besid China." Chou, who played a key rol in bringing Pakistan into close relations with Red China, sai the United Slates and its parl ners were "assuming saintl airs" in dispul between India and Pakistan. PALMS TAKE A BEATING These coconut palms, blown over and uproot- ed by Hurricane Betsy, lay in a cluster along the beach at Fort Lauderdalc, today. High tide waters were pushed inland by savage winds. (AP Wirephoto) FAST MOVING locates approximate position of hurricane lietsy in the Gulf of Mexico. Shaded area from Gal- vesfon, Texas, lo mouth of Mississippi River, was under hurri- cane warning. (AP Wircpholo) Was Taken Man Faces Charge In Store Holdup William Barrows, 48, was charged with grand larceny to- day in district court in an infor- mation filed by County Atty. Thomas J. Hanrahan, The charge stems from Tues- day's night holdup of Ihe Qual- ity Market. Barrows, who said his home is in Denver, Colo., allegedly look from the Helena busi- ness. An accomplice has not yet been apprehended. Ir.yron Smith, owner of the market, told The Independent Record today that an audit re- vealed was taken in (fie daring robbery which occurred at p.m. The defendant was arrested in the Norlhern Pacific railroad yard two hours after the inci- dent when George Loughridge, special agent for the NP, spot- fed a man answering the de- scription of one of the robbers. Barrows had in his posses- sion at the time of his arrest. Judge Lester H. Loble ap- pointed Conrad B. Fredericks to act as attorney for Barrows and set bond at He was re- manded to the custody of the Lewis and Clark County Sheriff. Barrows will meet with his attorney today and will appear before Judge Loble within a few days to enter a plea. Two men entered Ihe Quality Market about p.m. Tuesday and went to a rear aisle for a few minutes. Then they ap preached the checkout counters manned by Dean Kranich, night manager, and Jean Vetsch of East Helena. The robbers told Ihe clerks they had guns and de- manded all (he money from the cash registers, Kranicli told police (hat lie did not know if the robbers had guns, but said one kept his hand in his pocket as if he did have a weapon. State, National Weather Forecast, Helena and vicinity with occasional rain to- night. Partly cloudy wilh few showers Friday. Low tonight 44, High Friday 60. The official Helena (em- poralurc at 1 p.m. was 40 H. L. 79 50 66 45 1} 49 56 40 73 44 43 Sta lion- Billings Belgrade Brcadus Bulte Cul Bank Dillon 67 69 47 Glasgow 7B 51 Greal Falls 70 46 Havre Helens Kalispel! Lewlstown Livingston Wiles Cily Mi'ssoufa VI. Y'lslone CaJflary Chicago Denver Las Vegas aa S9 Los Angeles 79 Mpls.-SI. P'l 64 60 H 7S 54 41 _ 65 81 S! Mew Orleans 85 N. V. Cllv 84 Phoenix 93 P'lland, Ore. 79 SI. Louts 90 Salt Lake 72 San Fran. 44 Scallle Spcfcane 50 (7 47 68 47 71 45 70 46 81 53 71 -.1...... 36 Wash., D.C. 87 Stale procipilalion: Bllllr.gs. Irace Belgrade, .03; Broacfui, .01; Bullc, .05] Cut Bank, .13; Dillon, trace; Glasgow .M; Great Falls. .711 Havre, Helena .33; Xallspell, .14; Lcwlslovw, .13; Llv Inaslon. .10; Miles Cily, trace; Mlsioula Irace; W. Yellowstone, National precipitation: Calgary, .10 Chicago, .23; Spokane, trace. Truck Loaded With Bombs Leaves Highway DRUMMOND (AP) A truck bombs went off a rainy lighway today and one of two nen in Ihe cab was injured. A spokesman for Pacific In- ermountain Express in Missou- a said the name of the injured rucker was not known. He was aken lo a Missoula hospital. The mishap occurred five niles of Drummond on U.S. Highway 10-12. The truck- ine spokesman said the wcst- lound truck carried military iambs. "They wouldn't explode unless hey were dropped from more ban 500 Ihe spokesman Nearly Leave Louisiana, East Texas Areas NEW ORLEANS (AP) A great exodus from lowlying coostol areas shaped up today as Hurricane Betsy, fresh from an attack on Florida, advanced on the Gulf Coast. More than resi- T. Carmichael, denls were expected to pack cars and Irailers today and head out of south Louisiana and east Texas, away from possible killer tides and 1 40- mile-an-hour winds. The Weather Bureau urged them to evacuate ns soon as possible before escape routes were cut off by rising waters. Receive Warnings The bureau hoisted emergen- cy hurricane warnings at 6 a.m. from the month of the Missis- sippi River west to Galvcslon, Texas. However, Betsy's exact target remained uncertain. The storm as fast moving, big and proved it- self unpredictable. The Weather Bureau said the mostly ..tor. the hurricane's center WHS wesfcrh Louisiana and the extreme up- per Texas coasts. Fear for Oil Section The multi-billion dollar off- shore oil industry oil wells and drilling platforms, some of them 100 miles from evacuating and bat- tening down. All possible equip- ment had headed for inland wa- ters. About oil workers had been moved to safety. At 8 a.m. (he Navy located the center of Bclsy about 235 miles southeast of the moulh of the Mississippi Hiver. She was moving west-northwest at 18 miles an hour. The trickle of evacuees started at Cameron, the little town in western Louisiana near t h e Texas border, where Hurricane Audrey killed 500 people in June 1957. Most of them died in surg- ing tides which swept the coast- al area. Betsy left most of the Miami- (Conlimicil on Pago 8) Ex-Highway Engineer, Dies Troy Carmichael, 75. of 708 Harrison, member of a pioneer Monlana ranch family, and for- mer slate highway engineer, died this morning, following an extended illness. Mr. Carmichael began his ca- reer with the Slate Highway De- partment following service with the Army Tank Corps in World War I. Later from 1922 to 1827 he served as Helena's city engi- neer before starting on a con- struction.-careen..w.hj.c h took him throughout the western hemisphere. He returned to Montana in (lie lafe ISWs and was appointed slate highway en- gineer in 1950 succeeding C. E. Born in County He was born March 5, 1890, on Flat Creek Ranch in north- ern Lewis and Clark County, the son of J. H. and Lowell Brook Carmichael. His father was one of the slate's pioneer sheepmen. After attending Helena High Scliool and Columbia Military Academy in Missouri, he was graduated as a civil engineer from the University of Missouri. He was married lo Irene Budd, daughter of Dick and Mary Blake Budd, pioneer residenls of Helena, on June 16, 1928, in Bellingham, Wash. His experience included con- struction work in Victoria, B.C., and Portland, Ore., highway (Continued on Page 8) MISS MONTANA JOINS IN FUN Miss Montana, Dianne Feller, Helena, right, joins in the backstage fun at the Miss America pageant' at Atlantic City, N.J. She and Penelope Clark, center, Miss North Carolina, and Susan Pack, left, Miss Oregon, in an impromptu song and dance routine, (AP Photo)   

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