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Independent Record Newspaper Archive: June 04, 1965 - Page 1

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Publication: Independent Record

Location: Helena, Montana

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   Independent Record (Newspaper) - June 4, 1965, Helena, Montana                                U.S. Astronauts Whirl Into Second Day of Orbit By Howard Benedict Houston, Tex. .Astro- nauts James McDivitt iind Ed- ward White whirled into the sec- ond day ot llicir marathon space mission their spirits high and tlicir (light plan back on schedule after some hectic early hours during which White strolled .in space. The Mission Control Center said everything appeared favor- able for the Gemini 4 spacecraft to complete its full 97-hour, 50- imnutc mission. If there are no bitches, Amer- ica's longest manned space flight will end at p.m. (EST) Monday with a parachute splash- down in the Atlantic Ocean 400 miles southwest of Bermuda. During a pass over the Houston Control Center, today, White told capsule communicator Virgil Grissom a few more details about his 20-mimitc excursion into. space during orbit No. 3 Thurs- day. While described as "vivid blue" the waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. He said he clearly saw Houston and Galvcs- ton Bay as he floated on the end of a golden lifeline more than 100 miles above the earlh. He said ho even saw Clear Lake, about 3 miles long and 1'A miles wide, near the Houston homes of both astronauts. While said the jet-gun maneu- ering unit he used made it much easier to move about outside the capsule. When he wasn't using it, he said, lie had difficulty get- ting around. White also said he had walked on the equipment section of Ihe Gemini 4 during his excursion. "It looked like I was right on top of ho said, "It's kinda hard to get traction." John Hodge, the overnight flight director, told newsmen to- day that during the night Mc- Divilt and White managed to get back on the original flight plan. The plan had been disrupted during the first three orbits when McDivilt made a futile at- tempt lo catch and rendezvous with another satellite the burned out third stage of the Titan 2 rocket that boosted them into orbit. After expending about 40 per cent of his fuel, McDivilt aban- doned the effort. The chase con- tributed to a one-orbit delay in While's space excursion. I lodge said that throughout the night, Ihc Gemini 4 was al- lowed to drift on its orhilal pain without any expenditure of fuel. Hodge said two orbit-changing maneuvers would be dropped from Ihe flight and there would be some curtailment of scientif- ic experiments that require spacecraft maneuvering. He said McDivitt and White were getting used lo sleeping in space after initial "tossing and turning" periods, Each slept well on their second four-hour slum- ber period, he reported. "Now thai we're back on a regular Hodge said, "we'll be able lo start working out compatible, work, sleep anil eat cycles for future long-dura- tion flights." This is one of the major goals of (he flight, along with gather- ing of medical data to deter- mine how well the astronauts withstand long exposure lo Ihe weightless world of space. Gemini 4 began its second 24- hour period at a.m. (EST) today. Al p.m. it will sur- pass Gordon Cooper's U.S. man- in-space record of 34 hours and 20 minutes, established in May Russian cosmonaut Valcry By- kovsky holds Ihe record of 119 hours 6 minutes. White look over the controls of Gemini 4 shortly after a.m. (EST) to let command pilot James McDivilt relax in his sec- ond sleep period. Mission control informed the aslronauUs their capsule was re- volving about the earth in an (Continued on Cage 11) Helena, Montana, Friday, June 4, 1965 14 Pages Price Ten Cents GOP Gathers in City Hears Party Leaders GRADUATION crowd of at- tended commencement exercises at Helena High gym- nasium Thursday night. The largest class in the school's history, was graduated. (Staff photo by Norm Clarke) More Than Attend Helena High Qraduation U.S. Marines Say Goodby To DR Area By Norm Clarke A crowd of more Ihan attended commencement exer- cises at Helena High gymnasium Thursday in which the largest class in history was graduated. The Class of 1905, numbering The first address of the eve- ning was given by Victor Kies- ling, salutalorian. out your blueprint. A magnifi- cent return will come lo anyone who will follow inslructions. Use the blueprint, of success and the Susan Eagle, a studenl, will bc vollrs Hoifs for. Jack Holt, a parent, followed with mula for success was 1C limes A remarks. Jliss Eagle said, "We j times II plus 1' or knowledge 402 graduates, represented t0 (10 [he best with jlimcs altitude limes skill times habits plus personality equals snc- growlh of more Ihan Iwice the size of the class graduated in 1355, when the new Helena High building was constructed, C. R, Anderson, superintendent of schools said. Governor Attends Among Ihe thousands in at- tendance for the ceremonies were Gov. Tim Babcock and his wife Bclty who watched their youngest daughter, Maria Kay, receive her diploma. Following the processional, played by (he Helena Senior High Symphonic Band, the Rev. Martin A. Baumann, pastor of the First Lutheran Church, de- livered Ihe Invocation. An all-senior brass scxlelle pre- sented the music selection, "March Valliant." Members of the group were Don Holmquist, Carolyn Hyer, Joan Hate, Dan Nelson, Jerry Watne, and Melvin King. Selective Service Dps Draft Call; Highest Since '61 Washington The De Tense Department issued today ils biggcsl monthly draft cal since Ihc Berlin crisis late in 1001. H asked Selective Service to induct men in July for Ihe Army. This is slightly above Ihe June call of The call in November 1961, the Berlin crisis year, was for men. Drall quotas have been on Ihe upgrade in large part because enlistments have fallen off. vhat we have." Holt, speaking in the lighter asked the students to "map I (Continued on I'age 8) Helena Girl Injured Student Nurse Is Killed In Billings Car Crash Billings (if) A student Hirse from Miles City was killed Thursday night in a two-car crash at a west side Billings residential intersection during a heavy rain. The victim was Janice Hart- man, 21. Right other persons, seven of them student nurses with Miss Hartman at St. Vincent's Hospi- tal, were injured but none seri- ously. Police identified the drivers of the two cars involved as Janet Louise Sauber, 20, of Billings, and Mrs. John Johnston of Bil- ings. Among those hospitalized were: Barbara McDonald, 20, Geyser; Pnfsy Schuster, 21, Bil- lings; Shari Smart, 21, Helena, and Susan Allen, 22, Sacramento, Calif. Miss Smart and the accident victim were thrown from the car in the collision. She suffered a cut arm. jirl, Judith McKcnzic, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. McKciuic 1735 Missoula, are to be gradu ated from SI. Vincent's School ol Nursing Sunday. School officials liavo not made any announcemen! on change of plans for the bacca laureate set for Saturday and Ihc commencement exercises. The dcalli brought Ihe stale traffic toll lo 88, compared with 101 one year ago. Astronauts Speak With Their Wives Houslon, Texas Mrs. James A. McDivill, Edward II. While II lold Ihcir husbands lo "lie good" and lo "have a good flighl" today in line firsl space conversation be- After being treated in hospital [twecn aslronauls and their wives. she called her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred J. Smart of 924 Knighl. Miss Smarl said Ihe student nurses were returning from a graduation class dinner and were only a block away from their residence hall when the accident occurred. sounded bright, a little self-con- The woman happy and scions as their voices traveled more than 100 miles into space to the Gemini 4. The wives were at Mission Control Center here and their husbands were crossing California Santo Domingo, Dominican Re- public The U.S. Marines aid goodby lo Santo Domihga to- day as President Johnson ordered he rest of Ihem oul. Helicopters were airlifting the leathernecks to the carriei Boxer offshore. There was no indication whcth cr Ihc carrier and her escort vould sail for oilier waters once he Marines were aboard. Johnson announced in Chicago Thursday night thai Brazilian Gen. Hugo Panasco Alvim, com inandcr ol the Inler-Aniericat Force in Ihe Dominican Republic liad advised him 'Thai condition in the Dominican Republic permit further reduclion of ou military personnel." "I have accordingly ordcrc' Ihe withdrawal of all remainin units of the United Slates Mr rine Corps totaling approximate, ly Ihc President salt Departure of Ihc Marine leaves U.S. paratroopei serving with Lalin-Amer can troops in the Inter-America Force. Peace negolialors of the Organ- ization of American Stales con- tinued talks with rebel and junla leaders. At UN headquarters in New York, Soviet Delegate Nikolai T. Vciloreiiko asked (he Security i Council lo gel Ihe Inlcr-American Force out of the Dominican Re- public and lo investigate rebel charges that Ihc junta has ex- ecuted hundreds of rebel sym- pathizers. U.S. Delegate Charles W. Yost replied lhat the council was not the place to discuss charges of violation of human rights. He said Ihc Inter-American Korea was helping the Dominicans and did not violate the UN Charier, Pickets Galher At Houston Space Center Houston, Texas (fl5) Some vo dozen white and Negro slu- cnfs demonstrated at the main ate of the Manned Spacecraft enler today, calling attention to hat one picket characterized as ie "cruel contrast" between the ernini 4 project and Ihe city's chool integration policies. A printed though unsigned ress release handed out at the ate by demonstrators referred o Houston as "the world's largest egregaled school system." The pickets emphasized thai ;ie protest was not againsl the icmini shot or the space pro- Irani. Security officers at the gate of lie multimillion-dollar center hat is controlling the Gemini ghl watched the group but did lot interfere. The Kev. Leigh Fair, assistant inslor of Ihe New Pleasant Grove iaplist church, Houston, led the group away about 11 a.m. but said, "We'll be hack." John K. Bell By Thomas E. Mooney Montana Republicans, meeting in Helena in special con- vention, this afternoon heard their two top elective officials ead for party unity and harmony in the years ahead. Gov. Tim Bobcock, delivering what he t-srmed a "state of -ie party" message, struck out at those who are "Republi- ans by degrees only" and emphasized lhat only through arty unity will the GOP win in the 1966 and future ekc- ons. He also devoted a major lore of his talk to atrack- what have become two f his major targets: "The 965 Montana Legislature, ontrolled in both houses by 'emocrats, and Sen. Lee Met- alf, who comes up for re- lection next year. Congressman Batlin stressed lie. "necessity of working Three Bank Employes Die in Holdup Big Springs, Neb. Three persons were shot lo death and a fourth wounded in a holdup at the Farmers State Bank of Big Springs Ibis afternoon. Sheriff Harry Shaw said the dead, all bank employes, included two men and a woman. A male employe was wounded, he said. Shaw said he didn't know im- mediately how many persons were involved in the holdup, nor id be know how much money tnken. Big Springs is a town of 500 in Nebraska, about 10 miles rom Julesburg, Colo. The bank currently lists in deposits. John Bell New Attorney For State UCC John F. Bell, 46, a former A Force legal officer, was appoin ed attorney for Ihe Montana Ui employment Compensation Coin mission today. The appointment was made 1 UCC Chairman Edgar II. Rcede Bell succeeds Edward C. Schro ter who died Jan. 31. Bell is >cgin his new work June 14. Dell was lieutenant colonel the Air Force, lie received a law I degree from Montana Slate Uni-j vcrsily in 1951. j lie maintained a legal resi- dence in Missoula, Kceder said. A native of Minneapolis, Bell at- tended public schools in Mimic- Miss Smart and another Helena in thoir 18th orbil. Chit Chat From Astronauts Houston, Texas While Gemini 4 was circling the earth today in the second day of its four-day mission, Edward If. White I! was chatting with cap- sule communicator Virgil (Gus) Grissom. While re-lived some moments of his space stroll Thursday and was brought up to dale on ter- rcstial doings. He had laken con- trols of Hit: spaceship while com- mand pilol James McDivilt slept. The following conversation oc- currcd as the crafl passed Car- narvon Slalion in Australia sliorl- ly before 7 a.m. EST. Corked Off While: "hooks like Jim's corked off pretly well. He hasn't stirred, now, (lie last hour and a half." Grissom: "Okay, I have a news release here for him about Mike's baseball team. Do you want to take il and pass il on to White: "Yes, pass up." Gels Baseball Score Grissom: "Okay. The Hawks won their Pec-Wee League 3-2. They heal the Falcons, The Hawks got three runs off two hits. The Falcons got two runs on Ihrec hits." White: "Roger, Understand. The Hawks won 3-2." Grissom: "Roger. Iley, uh, here's Ihe headline of the Hous- ton Post foday you might pass on also. Thought it was prclly good. Big headlines arc: 'Aw, Ed, please gel back In Ihc space ship.'" While: "II was lough to conic in and a little lough lo get back into. It was sure lough to gel Into." Grissom: "I'll bel. I have you." Postmasters to Meet Livingston Montana postmasters will galher in Liv- ingston Monday for (heir annual slale mecling. About 150 of Mon- tana's 400 postmasters are ex- pected lo allend Ihe three-day meeting. State, National Weather Forecast, Helena and Fair tonight and Saturday, Cooler tonight, low 38. Slighlly warmer (Jelling Message Through While: "Were you all reading n8h us? We never knew whether youtTnl, Orrif.in1 (ciuucra were reading us or not." Grissom: "Yeah. Your box was keyed all the time. We couldn't get in. We'd Iry lo lell you your lime was up and get back and we never could get through lo yon al all." lure al 2 p.m. was National H. L. niuinns -----ao n nismarcfc Belurndc 77 15 Calgary _.., II. I. 81 55 Ilroarfus ----19 45 Chicago __ 58 52 Bullc 72 12 Denver __ BO 1 Cut Bank 67 10 Las Vegas _ 8.1 50 oiasiow 09 51 New Orleans 6 Wlliln- "Oh Is Hill ridlil? rin. 'Dillon 77 15 Los 68 5! un. is inai ngntf J m ?2 Mpis.-st. ri 12 01 glad you dicin'l." Grissom, laughingly: "Yeah. I could loll lhat." Grissom asks for a technical reading, (hen says: "Have you had anything lo cat Great _ 73 41 N. York City 70 Havre _______ W Piiocnljr ffO 5i Helena ____ 11 10 P'llnnd. Ore. 10 41 Knllspcll 72 10 Bl. Louts _. 85 6' Lcwtstown fi7 12 Bnlt Ijlkr. ___ 80 1 77 45 San Fran. __ S7 5 81 48 Seattle 73 4 Miles City .1 "i .'Mlswuln -11 18 Spokonc 75 White: "I'm in Ihe middle of w, vistone. in 42 wnnh.. n.c. 73 and I'm gonna fix a lilUc chicken salad and finish it off (Continued on Page 11) Stale precipitation: ,18: Bel Rriulc, .03; nrcnriUK, .30: Cut Dnnk, ITQCU Olnsitow, trace: Great Foils, trace Havre. .01; Lcwlstown, .05; LIvlnRston .01; Miles City, .01, Airmen Die In Crash Of Tanker Plane Koswell, N.M. Five irmen were killed in Ihc crash if an Air Force KC135 (anker to- cther because if we don't we ,-ill lie doing cxaclly what Ihe ipposilion wants us lo n the status of a minority party.'' Batlin devoted a considerable lorlion of his talk to pointing to hings being pushed by the John- administration, which lie said vere many limes in direct con- lict and not in the best interest if Montanans. licet al Civic Ccnler Both Babcock and Battin spoke at the opening session of the two day convention, held in the Civil Center. Also on Ihe program was Raymond V. Humphreys ot Wash inglon, D.C., director of educa lion and training for the Ucput lican National Committee. Principal business of the coi eniion is lo rewrite party rules mi regulations, a move made icccssary by changes in Ihe clcc- ion laws, voted by the 19B5 Leg- slalure. The Assembly shortened he lime between the primary and jeneral elections ot the future, unking necessary various read- uslmcnls in party rules of pro- cedure. ilanqiiet Salunlay. The sessions are lo be climaxed jy a banquet in the Civic Center >allroom Saturday al 7 o'clock, iabcock and Batlin also will ap- jcar on Ihe banquet program, in addition to U.S. Hep. Gerald Ford of Michigan, Ihc House minority leader in Ihe present Congress. Babcock today pleaded for "the eamwork thai produces pros- icrily for our parly" and de- clared lhat "while we will sur- vive as a Republican Party (fol- lowing Ihe defeats of we're going to require some blood transfusions it we arc again lo be- come buoyant and vigorous enough to being winning elec- tions." "The ingredient for he said, "it unity. It there is one thing which wo must do as a party, lhat is slop ballling among (Continued on Page 11) sola was graduated from Schattuck Military Academy at Fairbaull, Minn. He look a pre-law course al Macalisler College al SI. Paul and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army in 1940. Senate Okays Plan to Urge LBJ to Up VA Hospital Capacity; Avert Closings Senate completed congressional action 1 today on a resolution urging Pres- ident Johnson to increase Ihe au- thorized capacily of veterans hos- pitals from to beds. Approval was by voice vote. ircraft Thursday nighl Walker Air Force Base, j mission as a major. Names of Ihc dead were wilh- icld pending notiticalion of noxl f kin. The tanker was on a routine mission and approaching a Walk- er AFB runway when the ac- cident occurred, base spokesmen sakl. _ White House Getting Chain-Link Fence Washington A new, ihain-link fence is going up in ront of the While House. It will be only lemporary to serve until the existing black, 'ron picket fence is replaced, White House press secrelary jeorge 15. Reedy said today. Only the portion directly in He transferred lo the Army] Tllc rosoliilion is an effort to Air Corps in 1942 and served Of[ die threatened closing a chief photographic intelligence :of n veterans hospitals to avoid officer for the 9lh Air Force in i going over Ihc VA's authorized the European Theater until June bed limit as new hospilals 1944 when his plane was inlo operation, the Senate down during Ihe invasion ofjLabor ;lnd Public Welfare Com- France, He was captured by said in a report endorsing Germans and placed in prison.! the measure. In April 1945 he and five prison-] The limitations arc set by ex- crs made a successful escape to eculivc order, and never were set Allied lines. jby Congress, Ihe coinmillee said. After his discharge, Bell en- The resolution expressed the rolled at Montana Slalc Univer- sense of Congress thai 111 sity, bill afler one quarter ac- pacity should bc increased, near ccptcd a regular Air Force com- Sen. Clifton P. Anderson, D- N.M., in a Senate speech said Ihclpilals. VA informed him "new hospilals could not be built until the old ones are under the 000 limitation set by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1959. Anderson said Ihc VA has a waiting list of veterans de- siring lo enter hospitals. He said he and Sens. Mike Mansfield, and Lee Metealf, D-Mont. and Joseph M. Montoya, D-N.M. agreed "H did not make much sense lo close out those facilities long before new hospitals in Ihe discussion stage were to bc constructed." He said he is aware the VA in- tends lo build new and better facilities at more convenient loca- tions but "this is no guarantee they will be buill ncxl year or within Ihc next 5 to 10 weeks." In the meantime, Andcrsbi said, Ihe agency has had lo con- tract for bed space in other bos- Heavy Ground Fighting U.S. Marines on Offense In Viet Cong Skirmishes Saigon, South Viet Nam U.S. Marines killed 19 Viet front of the While House on Ihc norlh, along Pennsylvania Ave- nue, is being replaced al Ihis lime, needy said. Arrive in Moscow Moscow A delegation from Communist North Viel Nam arrived lotlay for talks with Sovlol leaders. An official announcement of ;heir arrival gave no indication of the reason for Ihc trip or how long Ihcy would slay, Premier Phan Huy Quat, dial-Jin more Communist am- lenged by Phan Khac Sun, chief j bushes, one a follownp action by Jong and wounded 11 in skmn- of (f) fj..c hvo Cabinct min. Reds to an earlier ambush shcs today in the DaNang-Phu Jai area, a spokesman announced. Ie said two Marines were killed and 19 wounded. The Leathernecks took the of- 'cnsive in a day of scattered jround fighting across South Viel Nam, in which the Viet 2ong strove lo maintain the ini- lialivc. Govcrnmcnl casualties for today and Thursday rose lo al least 239 killed, wounded and missing. Political Crisis Solved In Saigon, the National Legis- lative Council apparently re- solved a political crisis simmer- ing for two weeks. The 20-inem- her council upheld a right of islcrs. A spokesman said -Sun was near Lao Thien, about 150 miles now supporting Quat. U.S. Ambassador Maxwell D. Taylor, who postponed a project- ed Irip lo Washington lasl week- end lo keep watch on Ihc crisis, may now head to the United States in Ihc nexl few days. I.ol of Kncniy Troops A ranking U.S, military spokes- man, speaking of the makeup of enemy forces, said there arc so many of North Viet Nam's regu- lar troops fighting now in South Viet Nam "il is becoming aca- demic" whelhcr they arc here as regular Norlh Vietnamese units. Vietnamese Iroops were caught northeast of Saigon. Casualties in the first ambush of a six-vehicle convoy Thursday totaled 15 government troops killed, 15 wounded and 15 miss- ing. Two armored cars svero de- stroyed, two trucks damaged and Iwo machine guns lost. Commu- nist losses were riot known. A relief force sent in a few hours later was hit about seven miles northc-asl of the first ac- lion. The government losses in Ihis engagement were nine killed and 14 wounded. Planes and ar- lillcry fire finally roulcii Ihc guerrillas.   

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