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Independent Record Newspaper Archive: October 13, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Helena, Montana

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   Independent Record (Newspaper) - October 13, 1959, Helena, Montana                                Vol. XVI-No. 325 Helena, Montana, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1959 Five Oenti Explorer VII Joins Space Parade After Boost by Juno Rocket Challenges Four Gyroscope Type Employment Both Decrease em- Steel Heads to Meet Him ATTEND WHITE HOUSE STATE and Mrs. Eisenhower tendered a formal state dinner for the President of Mexico and Mrs Adolfo Lopez Mateos. Here, the group poses for pictures before entering the dining room. President Eisenhower is talking with Eva Lopez Mateos, daughter of the Mexican Chief Executive. The latter was returning a visit President Eisenhower made to Acapulco. Washington Steel- workers Union President David J. McDonald today invited heads of the four biggest steel companies I off' seasonally "by ito mecl with him immediately toj to 66.347.000 in Scplem-inammcr oul a settlement of the her. This droo was expected be- 91-day strike. The invitation McDonald called it a is-] sued during his testimony to ber. This drop was expected be- cause of the return of temporari- ly employed students to school. Unemployment fell by Astronaut to Circle World Three Times in Hours By Vern Haugland Langley, flight plan for the first Mercury manned satellite was made public at this space capital today. It calls for the Mercury capsule to zoom three times around the earth at an altitude of 100 miles and land in the Atlantic off the Bahama Islands not far from the Cape Canaveral, Fla., launching Traffic Deaths One Short Of 1958 Total By The Associated Press The deaths of a Butte man and a New Jersey bride in separate accidents have raised Montana's 1959 traffic toll to 192, just one iu" less than recorded in all of 1958. Third Time They raised to six the number of traffic victims reported since last Friday. Xewest Victims Dead are: j Joe Pearee, 70, Buttc, who offi-j cers said was struck by a carl Sunday at an intersection, break-! ing a siring of 483 deathless days! in Butte. Janet Oliendo, 17, N.J., fatally injured Friday as the car she was in left U.S. 10 j 12 miles east of Big Timber. Coroner Andy Aleksich said1 the Pearee death would be site. The whole trip would lake 4Vz hours. Travel at M.P.H. Hurtling along at miles an hour most of the way, the satellite would cross South Afri- ca, Australia and a narrow south- ern strip of the United States. As outlined search center aeronautics and space administra- tion, and confirmed by one of the seven Mercury astronauts, the de- tailed flight plan calls for a launching slightly north of east from Cape Canaveral. First Orbit The initial here at the re- of the national orbit would cross the North Atlantic, the main part of Africa, southern Australia and southern U.S. The second orbit would cross Bermuda, Madagascar, Howland and Baker islands in the central Tucson and Savannah, Ga. The third orbit would cross the South Atlantic, north of Johan- nesburg, eastern New Guinea, and The descent will begin over the Pacific, and will take the space capsule across San Diego, San Angelo, Texas, New Orleans, and down to a landing in the Ba- hamas. I to primarily due jto the job seeking youngsters leaving the labor market to re- sume classes. The idle figure being still over three million raised the prospect that Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell may have to eat his hat on the labor depart- ment building steps. Mitchell has pledged to do just that if the October idle figure was above three million. September employment, at was higher than a year ago. Unemployment at was less than a year ago. Grandmas' Fling Quite Dignified President Eisenhower's fact-find- ing board which will advise the president on Friday whether the strike is a justifying a national emergency Taft-Harlley injunc- New York Visiting grandmothers by the score are in town today, ready for a dignified little fling in the big city. They arrived on the eve of the 18th annual convention of the Na- .ional Federation of Grandmother Clubs. Many set out immediately for the big department stores, and to lunt up ickets. Edith B. theater and television Waddell of Corpus Christi, Texas, a bright-eyed, chip- >er lady with short-cropped hair, is their leader. The 21-year-old; organization has enrolled grandmothers from all over the country. The grandmothers, besides busying themselves with commun- ity activities, also take stands on national and social issues. The grandmothers' colors are gold and brown, their flower the chrysanthemum. "All symbolic of said j Mrs. Waddell, "the time we fin: ourselves blessed wilh grand molherhood." lion lo open the mills for an 80- day cooling off period. Trying Since April McDonald told the board the union has been trying since April to gel direct negotiations with chief executive officers of the major steel companies. He said those officers always participated in bargaining in past disputes. "I personally would like to sit down with these men of respon- Roger Blough, A. B. Homer, Avery Adams and Charles really talk out the issues in an allempt' to settle the McDonald said. Wants to Work "Let us go lo work, while this j board proceeds with its fact-find-; ing he said. i "I challenge these men lo ap-i "The chief executive officers of the sleel companies are the re- sponsible people and the decision] is theirs. I would like to meet with them right now." INTERESTED Stcclworker Al Zachocki takes a break from picket duty to read the story telling of President Eisenhower's invoking the Taft-Hartley law to end the 13-week steel strike. With Zachocki are two unidentified guards outside the U.S. Steel's South Chicago, III. plant. Police Nab Juvenile In Probe of Burglaries Three Helena youths, ranging; Chief Fred gave the following 15- and 17-years-old, of the two activities: Newell Gough Named to Bank Board Newell Gough, Jr., has been elected a director of the First National Bank and Trusl Co., Presidenl Fred H e i n e c k e an- nounced loday. Gough is a mem- ber of Ihe legal firm of Weir, Gough, Booth and Burke. Gough has resided in Helena since 1935 when he joined the law firm of Weir, Clift, Glover and Bennetl after his graduation ing inlo facls surrounding the from the Montana State Univer- Khrushchev Kept Promise to Ike Soviet PremicriThc airplane incident has been a Trio ownership of nearly worth of camera equipment and binocu- lars found brokej Batch's. with the loot from sity law school in Missoula. Gough is a native of Missoula where he attended schools before enrolling at Shattuck school in Faribault, Minn. World War II Veteran The new director of the bank to the traffic accident. Police' The police chief said the three1 them in a culvert north of Helena. jn apprehension juveniles. has Decn will) thc firm and listed the driver of the car as I have signed statements admitting! 'pne since departed l'ls successors since with the ex Jack Grace, 21. I their complicity after being taken j0jned them in looting Lundy's.! In Big Timber, officers said custody Sunday and Monday. A car was stolen from a garage 1 cd as a traffic fatality althoughjbeen turned over to juvenile Becri cigarets the body did not have many ex- thorities after admitting The two older youths lerior signs of injury. pation in one or more of three jinto Moore's store with a wreck-i "The" chief commended Police He said an autopsy was burglaries in the past Dar. They took Don Raw and Patrolman formed Monday and preliminary j months, Police Chief John six-packs of beer and several Thornton Durkee, whom he findings indicate death was due'Fred said today. ;cartons of cigarets and cached credited with being instrumenta Nikila Khrushchev has carried out his promise to President Ei- senhower to discuss with Mao Tzc-lung Ihe possible release of five Americans jailed in Red China, diplomatic sources say. The results of the reported talks is not known here. Include Bishop The imprisoned Americans are Robert Ezra McCann, Pasadena, Calif.; John Thomas Downey, New Britain, Conn.; Richard George Fecteau, Lynn, Mass.; Hugh Francis Redmond, Jr., Yon- kers, N.Y.; and Roman Catholic Bishop James E d w a r d Walsh, Cumberland, Md. Four were charged wilh spy- ing. Bishop Walsh has been incommunicado since October! 1958. No charges against him have been announced. sore point in Soviet-American re- lations. Plane Strayed The United States .says the un- armed air force transport was shot down by Soviet fighter planes and crashed near the Turkish frontier, after had Main Goal Cosmic Study Cape Canaveral, The United States put into I orbit today anew "gyroscope" satellite expected to answer many questions about spaca and weather. The satellite, named Explorer VII was put alott with a power- ful Juno II rocket fired here at a.m. EDT. In Washington, the national space agency announced at p.m. that "Explorer VII is in orbit." Completes Orbit The satellite had completed one complete orbit around the earth shortly before the announcement, an agency spokesman said. Weighing 91V4 pounds, the satellite's main goal is to study cosmic radiations, knowledge of which is a key to space travel by man. The 76-foot rocket rose ponder- ously from its launching pad. It accelerated rapidly and, after about 40 seconds, arched high in the sky and headed toward the northeast, spurting a brilliant tail of fire. A minute later it vanished in a cloud bank. If all went right, all tour stages would ignite in about 13 minutes, sending the payload into space at speed of miles an hour. Twenty-five minutes after launching it was announced that all four stages of the rocket fired successfully and performed ac- cording to plan. Second Shot It was the second space shot of the day from the cape. Earlier, a B47 bomber launched a 37-foot Bold Orion missile, aiming it at a point 10 miles in front of the explorer VI "paddle wheel" satel- lite. At the time the satellite was at 160 miles altitude in the low point of its orbit and traveling at repeated U.S. inquiries have failed to get any satisfaction on what became of the other 11 men aboard. The USSR charges that [he U.S. plane violated its fron- tier deliberately. report on Mrs. Oliendo's death was delayed because of difficulty Admit Lootings iand driven to the store. The; ivoulhs loaded Ihe car with 30 i UN Suspends Balloting The ?5.' Helena" Qfl Deadlock in identifying her. Her Fred sald tile and of beer, cigarets and food. George, 19, was hospitalized 5'oulhs have ,oot was cached north of tne' 'burglarizing Moore's store onicity the car was returned shock, then released. 'accompanied by a third who 12 miles east of [looting Lundy's Market Sept. Clothes U.S. 10, Timber. The highway patrol said the was en route to New Jer- Tne poiice said the Fred added. The younger two said they stole a car on Breckenridge for the United Nations, forts to fill a vacant seat in the UN security council were sus- i younger two admitted breaking! Batch job They broke into today unti) nexl Monday This year's toll of 192 compares j into Batch's store on Last Chance'store through a window and took after 25 balloLs failed to break ivilh 152 a year ago Tuesday. Gulch Sept. 14. j Iceplion of World war II service with the 8th armored division in Europe. He lefl the service as a major. Gough is Montana attorney for Ihe Great Northern railway, chair- man of the Sixth Army advisory commillee, secrelary of thc Mon- tana Historical society, president of St. Peter's hospital, director of the Montana Flour Mills Co., Yel- lowstone Park Co., and Spanish Creek Ranch Co. He is a member of thc American Bar association, i the Montana Bar association and i a stubborn East-West deadlock. Returns To Old Home Town Abilene, an Eisenhower returned to his old American transport that crashed ;nome town today wilh a nostalgic m_Soviet Armenia in aUhe past a warningfor Eleven Unknown j again the Soviet Union has said it has. no information on Ihc fale of 11' American airmen aboard 1958. Mikhail N. Smirnovskv. coun-l selor of Ihe Soviet embassy, gave! world mllst lcarn lo work that word lo Undersecretary of ;logetner" Eisenhower said, "or State Jlonday. innaliy i( will not work at all This was a sort of pre-birlhday iii ;Parlv 'he president. He will ElTI A I I !be 69 Wednesday. strayed off course over Soviet 26.000 miles an hour, territory. There was no immediate detail The Soviets turned over the j the outcome beyond a doscrip- bodies of six crew members, of lne launching as "suc- cessful." Further reports awaited study of telemetry signals from the mis- sile and a comparison of those data with radar readings on its flight. The launching w'as carried out over the Atlantic missile range by a B47 bomber from Patrick air force base at 5 a.m. Check Accuracy No attempt was made to inter- cept or knock down the satellite, but only to pass near it in order to check the accuracy of the guidance system. The missile was built by the Martin company as part of an air force contract to demonstrate the feasibility of firing ballistic mis- siles from aircraft. The B47 fired the two-stage. 37- foot missile from beneath its wing while flying a few miles southeast of the cape at an altitude of 35.000 feel. !the potentially explosive world of jthe future. the Lewis and Clark Bar associa-; ition. State, National Weather 'clothing valued at more than They first took the lool to; Communist Poland continued ione of their homes, then to the jto lead Western-supported Tur- Three Children olhcr's before dumping it throughout the Iwo days of j Gough is married lo Ihe former: Forecast, Helena and Partly cloudy through Wedncs-j day. Low 38. high 68. of the capitol where is was found qecrcl jby police officers. 1 Chief Fred said two other juve voting in Ihe assembly. II The official Helena tempera (lire at 2 p.m. was 54; Montana Killings lii-lgrade liroadus Bullc Cul Bank Dillon Drmnmond Glasgow Groat Falls Havre Helena Kalispell l.ewislnwn Livingston Miles City Missoula We.il Yellowstone IVhileh.ill Jlax. .Min. I'cp. 82-nationi Willie C. Clary of Great Falls, j !They have three children, a daughter. Willie M., a junior at was not niles also are believed to be however, to muster the halj m III, a Van Doren, Says Graham Richmond. Va. Evan- gelist Billy Graham says Charles Van Doren should go before the congressional subcommittee in- And today he came back loAbi-At Low Point lene, the town in which he grewj At the moment up, to lake part in ground break- ing ceremonies for the Eisenhow- er Presidential library. of launch, the Paddle Wheel satellite was traveling north of here at its max- imum speed of miles an This will be the final at a height of about 160 place for Eisenhower's military j miles, the low poinl on its highly and presidential papers. elliptical orbit. National 49 56 49 50 45 5.0 55 32 46 34 58 57 46 56 39 58 51 55 Sl.ition- 33 29 31 26 42 33 32 30 43 27 Hi 44 33 40 33 3S 22 34 Tr'Bismarrk Calgary Cheyenne Chicago Tr i Denver TrlLas Vegas .02 Los Angeles Mpls.-St. Paul New Orleans New York City Phoenix Tr Portland, Ore. .03 SI. Louis Salt Lake Cily TnSan Francisco .OljSeatllc Spokane 'Washington. Montana-Parlly cloudy cast, considerably rs in north west through Wednesday. Warmer east Wcdn ,ows 35-45, highs 55-70 cast, 60-70 west. Max. i Mother, Three Children Die In Flash Fire "Newell Gough is a addition Io thc board'" volved in handling the stolen ]quired two-thirds majority, goods. j A few delegates tried to start garel. who Fred said police also are check-'a compromise switch to Yugo-jHelena. islavia, but this failed lo gain I momentum. It was Ihcn agreed! jlo drop the balloting to pern consultation among UN diplo mats. The vote on Ihe 25lh and final ballot was 43 for Poland and 36 lor Turkey. This represented only a slighl shift from Monday and was exactly the same as the I4th ballot, which opened this morning's session. freshman at Princeton, and Mar- attends school in Mrs. William 90, Early Day Resident, Dies T some mysterious reason he is Mrs- William Sk background "-'avoiding giving his ltclcna prove a great ,ik.hmond Timcs day night at the t n tlln K-inL- ,1......1...... c welcome vesligating fixed television quiz shows. i Personal Friend think Iragcdv that ;to Ihe bank." Ponliac. mother and her three children perished .53 j today in a flash fire. The mother's heroic attempt to lead two children through the Confesses Bank Robbery at Church Rites Soulh Koilney. followin fended illness. Mrs. Sicker was bom Fob. 1869. in Klk Cily. Neb., on Ihe flames was blamed for their deaths only three steps from the home's front safely. A 5-month-oId baby heavily wrapped in blankets by the .02 j mother for laicr rescue suffocated in an upstairs crib. Thc fire lasted no more than Tiny Baby Gains Weight on Hospital Fare Dispatch. "He is a personal ac- quaintance and I have groat re .sped for him." The evangelist said Van Doren. winner of S129.000 on the "Twenty-One" quiz show, has "Ihe site of the present city of Omaha, opportunity to help save the silua- Her parents, the lale Mr. and Mrs. lion if ho will come forth with William Howling were 'forthright and clear-cut testi- residents Muskogec. Gawex- mony." sey Smith. 29, a California painter. ______ who left church to confess a bank holdup, has been charged Know! bank robbery and abducting a New York --i.-l'i The lawyer hostage. for Charles Van Dorcn said loday Mrs. William Sieger. 90. early i Mrs. Kinsey. arc two other daugh- dent, died Mon-lcrs, .Mrs. W. B. Kiefner and Win- home of heriifrcd Montgomery, all of Helena; daughter. Mrs. S. .1. Kinsey, 571; two sons. Fred B. Sieger, Helena, and Charles M. Sieger. San Diego, Calif., a brofher, Clarence Dowrl- ing. Stilacoom. Wash., six grand- children, and eight great-grand- children. Mr. Sieger died March 4, 1958, the eldest son, Roy. on Aug. 26, 1932. in Helena, and a brother. Orian Howling on March 27 in Canada. She attended schools in Ne- braska, and on May 4. 1886, she married Mr. Sieger at Thursday Funeral services will be con- Alter their marriage they 2 p.m. Thursday in The charges were filed here by the quiz winner was ready to ae- moved hero, and Mr. Sieger Hagler chapel with the Rev. U.S. Ally. Harry G Fender. eepl service of a congressional Wa" operation of the Mcllenry of the Sevcnlh New Hyde Park. A removal hearing is scheduled subpoena for questioning in minutes. It slarled when space Baby Carolyn Denise Jones, who in San Francisco. U.S. Commis-iprobe of lixed TV quiz shows, header exploded. weighed 1 pound (i'.z ounces al sioner Harold Jewell sel Smilh's Ally. Carl .1. iiubino said thai The lather, Cecil Goincs, 29, birlh lasl July 7. left Long Island bail at al an arraignmenl. Van boron had not known the cloudy wilh few a first-floor win- Jewish hospital weighing 5'i Smith told ollicers in liedwood subpoena was issued last Friday losda.v (heater. Tnm.sfor Co. Pioneer Advrnlist Day Ariveutist church Bozcman, officiating. Pallbearers will he Jack Hay- Mrs. Sieger, a pioneer member A, Rausch ,Iarl.y the Seventh Hay Adventisl when he was sprayed by pounds. The child's in n I h e r, Cily, Calif., Sunday thai he robbed Van Doren had boon reported 'chinch, was well known lor her Jwoh flaming oil as he was lighting the.Elizabeth, called Ihe hig Webbers Falls, Okln., bank of (ravelins; in New F.iiKland during man.v charily. Burial will bf in Ihe family plot menl miracle. j lasl Feb. 3. the weekend. Surviving besides her daughter, at cemetery.   

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