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Havre Daily News Newspaper Archive: May 23, 1975 - Page 1

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Publication: Havre Daily News

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   Havre Daily News, The (Newspaper) - May 23, 1975, Havre, Montana                                tevoted to Of of Nwfft RAIN Vol. 60, No. 148 Havre, Montana Home of Northern Montana College Friday Evening, May LOOK INSIDE: Softball Marathon Raises -..Page 5 I PR1CE TEN CENTS Indy 500 Race Tops Holiday Sports Indy 500 Sunday at the In- i Motor Speedway: 200 laps around the 2y2.mlle track, sanctioned by the United Stales Auto Club but open to NASCAR, SCCA, Grand Prix and other drivers through International (FIA) listing; does not count In world driver starlings because of car en- gines up to 4.2 EOT from a fly-' ing slart following pirade and pace laps, led by actor-race driver James Garner in a Buick. Finish is unofficial until posting at 8 a.ra. Afondav. Field Thirty-three fastest cars in (four-Jap) quali- fications over four days. A.J. Foyt of Houston took (he pole position (inside front row) with an average speed of 193.97G miles an hour. Foyt, on the pole for the fourth time and seeking an unprecedented fourth Indy victory, is joined in the front row by Gordon John-; cock, winner of the raih-short- ened 1973 race, and Bobby Un- ser, the 1968 winner and run- ner-up to Johnny Rutherford last year. Foyt won in 1961-64- 67. other previous winners in the field are Mario Andrettl Al Unser (1970-71) arid Rutherford. Four rookies in'the field are Bill Puterbaugh, Shel- don Kinser, Larry McCoy and Eldon Rasmussen. Track Asphalt-paved ex- cept for ceremonial starting- line strip of brick, the original surface. Track is miles with four banked turns, two foot straightaways and two 660- foot straightaways (the so- called short Cars Minimiirn dry weight, .turbocharged, pounds. Av- cost: T "tSHe'-fich mally placed behind driver and No Paper On Monday The Havre Daily News will not publish on Monday, May 26 because the day willbeMem- orial Day, a holiday as estab- lished under the Monday Holi- day Bill, Publication will resume on Tuesday, May 27. Markets N. Y. STOCK Market quotations areprovid- ed through the courtesy of the Citizens Bank of Montana via D; A. Davidson and Co. in Great Falls. Quotations are as of p. m; May AL Spmkt. Am. Ametek. Anaconda Brunswick Budwelser B-N Ry. Chrysler Cities Service City Invest. Cont, Data, Coca-Cola Deere Detroit Edison Eastern Air Falrch. Cam. Firestone ,Ford Motor Gen. Elec. Gen. Motors IBM Jewel Co, Mont, Dak, Mont. Power Occidental Pet, J. C. Penney PhiL Pel Polaroid Safeway Schlltz TacoBell Texaco Texas Int, Un, Oil U. S. Steel Walgreen Woolwth. Xonics Zenith of rear axle, Fuel: melhanol, limited to 'at one time, 280 gal- Four mandatory, 10 the aver- age for 500 miles, usually 15 seconds in duration for refuel- ing, 20 seconds for tire changes. iUnX 'f'962 in 1972. Qualifying speed record: Rutherford's 198.10 m.p.b. in 1973. ae f absnt fro ttirse Depends on attend- ance and accessory prize mon- of which Rutherford A- provides official attendance. Speedway has seats for more fans and can ac- Radio Speedway Network to more than 600 stations in the United States and Canada, Armed Forces Radloj Austral- ia, Spain and Radio Free Eu- rope. Television -American Broadcasting Co. to telecast race Sunday on tapwlelay .basis beginning p.m. EOT and PDT, p.m. CDT. Mortality Including Chief Executive Sees 'New Era' for Nation worth Prize money will not be announced until Monday night Victory Dinner. tew t the 37 irlwrs, 14 mechanics, 9 spectators, 1 pit -crewman and 1 Speedway fire- maft> Colstrip's Opponents Point to Alternatives "S ENFORCING the government's directive to elettric power companies to convert to. coal, Federal Energy Administrator Frank G. Zarb announced several Midwest power com- panies have received stiff warnings 'with more ex- peeled to go out to East coast plants. Beirut By FRANK CORMIER suggestions that detente is til- Associated Press Writer to kror of the Soviet Un- WASHINGTON {AP) Pres- ion. "I strongly disagree with tdent Ford said today he senses the United States may be enter- Ing a new era of firmness, re- sponding to challenges and being ready to "stick with it" when faced with world prob- lems. Partly by its actions in the Mayaguez he told Eu- ropean newsmen in a White the President said, and those who assert It "are not correct" Where points of friction arise with the Soviet Union, he said, "we intend to be very firm, but detente gives us an opportunity to be Ford said he believed he and Soviet leader Leonid I Brezh. House Interview, me nation Is KV WOUW have to personally resisting a tendency to drift make SODie of f16 deci- into nee-Isolationism and is pre. slons In the effort to reach a pared "to act decisively." Strategic Arms Limitation The President acknowledged Bat at times the United States has isolationist tendencies. He traced recent polls reflecting this mood to Vietnam, but added; "The American people "Although I see problems In lems between Greece and TUT- one or two countries, internally, key over Cyprus, but he be. Ueves they can be solved. He said he was encouraged mat there were recent meetings be. tween the prime ministers of Greece and Turkey, and added he hoped to meet with leaders of both sides during the up- coming Brussels conference, He feels the majority won by socialists In Portuguese na- tional elections, in which Com- By. Hugh van Swearingeu Associated Press Writer HELENA, Mont. (AP) Op- ponents to tte construction of a- generating com- plex in Montana were 'expected again today to probe possible alternatives to the controversial project. Leo Graybiil Jr., attorney for the Northern Plains Resource Council, attempted on Thursday to demonstrate through cross- examination that the five firms .seeking to build the facility can Montana Power would own 30 per cent of the facility. O'Connor, a. Montana power consultant since retiring from the firm's presidency earlier ;this year, said .tte origiialdeci- sion to build generating plants at Colstrip was made by Mon- tana Power engineers and exec- utives. Coal to feed the generators will come from a mine oper- ated by Western Energy Co., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Montana Power Co. Graybill asked O'Connor if Montana Power chose: ,the Battle By JOSEPH PANOSSIAK Associated Press Writer BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) Palestinian guerrillas and the private army of Lebanon's right-wing Phalangist party battled for the fourth day today with mortars, machine guns and bazookas after Hie Leba- nese government failed in an attempf to put a buffer force between them. The casualty toll rose to' '.mgre than .25 and 150 wounded. Residents' in the battle area. Agreement He anticipated i this would oc- cur when Brezhnev visits the United States, "hopefully this fait" His impression is "mat the Western alliance is very strong are getting out from under that and there is no reason why It can't be made stronger We On other matters, Ford made do have to upgrade and mod- these! observations: ernize our military capability He rejects congressional In the alliance basically our alliance _ tte President said. He said his trip to a NATO summit meeting In Brussels next week is "aimed at solidi- fying and making more cohe. sive this econom- ically, diplomatically and mili- tary. "As long as the United States does not pull out and continues to be a strong partner, the al- liance will remain Ford said. He said he recognizes prob- munists gained only 15 per cent of the vote, has "not had a sig- nificant impact on dose who control me government" Comp Jury Begins Work unch. d d u u u u u 89 d d d u d u u u 218 u 4 unch. u 24 u d u u 48 d to d u 16 u unch. u rbnmentalist group whose members include some land, owners in the Colstrip area where the complex would be Fart of the thrust of Gray- bill's questions was to the ef- feet that the utility companies had made up their minds to go ahead with tte construction be. fore giving detailed study to al- ternatives. In questioning George W. O'Connor, retired president of the Montana Power Co., Gray, bill explored alternatives suclr as construction of coal-fired generating plants in otter" states, wind and solar power, and new hydroelectric faiil- ities.V The plan, proposed by Men- lana Power, Puget Sound er and Light, Portland General Electric, Washington Water Power, and Pacific Power and Light, calls for construction of two mine-mouth generating planks near a strip mine at Colstrip. ._____ Montana' Power sfiareholdere ultimately stood to gain from profits on the'sale of Western Energy coal to fuel the power complex. O'Connor replied that the availability of coal, regardless of ownership, was a major fac- in deciding to locate gener- ating plants there. O'Connor acknowledged mat Montana. Power's Irofifs from operations of Western Energy are corporate profits separate and, distinct from Montana Power's business as a public utility. He explained that this means the Western Energy profits are not considered In computing Montana Power's re- turn on investments for rate- making purposes. The hearing, which opened on Tuesday, is to be used by the state in determining U it will allow the construction. Most of the testimony given so far has dealt' with whether mere is a Montana need for the project. Students Flee African Center .JJow-Jones Averages: indus- trials 828.61 u 9.70; Trans. 167.77 u .90; Utilities 77.01 d .22; 4-Hr. Volume LOCAL MARKET wheat ordinary 12, 13, 14, Spring Wheat 13, .14, 15, Barley DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania (AP) The kidnaping of three American students and a Dutch girl is driving American stu- dents from a remote Tanzanian animal research center and may end a noted British anth- ropologist's work there, at least temporarily. About 30 Stanford University students were working with Dr. Jane GooJall, tte British au- thority on chimpanzees and ba- boons, at-the Combe animal re- serve oil the Tanzanian side of Lake Tanganyika, Some of them were flown to Nairobi, the capital of neighboring Kenya, while the others were reported coming to Dor es Salaam, 2 Groups To Have Rest Stop DeMolay Boys and Rainbow Girls will operate a stand at the highway rest StoponHighway Ko. 2 near the junction with High- way 87 and will sell coffee and Cookies on Memorial Day, May 26 from 50 a.m. to 4 p.m. The refreshments will be a welcome diversion for tourists and travelers. Dr. Goodall, who is the wife of Tanzania's national park di- rector, was going to her home in Dar es Salaam. Emily Polls, 20, of Olympia, Wash., said in Nairobi that the research center "will undoubt- edly close for some time, at least to white people." On Monday night, about 40 armed Africans landed on the lake shore at the reserve and took away Barbara Smuts, Ann Arbor, Kenneth Smith, Garden Grove, Calif.; 'Carrie Jane Hunter, Atherton, Calif., and Emilie Bergman of The Netherlands in their boats. It was believed they came from Zaire, on the west bank of the lake, and took their captives back there.. Jim Bduglv 21, of San Ma. rlno, Calif., said he and Ana Pierce, a Research assistant from Farmvtlle, Md In the darkness 20 feel from the Intruders while they threatened to kill a Tanzanian ranger un- less he showed them where the other whites were. "Cretus never said where w said Baugh. "He was a very brave man. He saved our lives." Miss Polls said she, too, "sat In the dark In the bush, listen. Ing for footsteps." mat trielto establish .a bnffer zone betwee'n tte' warring fao Sons Thursday night withdrew when they were caught in a. crossfire. This morning they .were re. ported observing the shooting but not participating. The Moslem Palestinians and Phalangists bat tled.for five days last month after a'-shooting at the dedica. tion of a rChristian .church guarded by the Phalangist mi- litia. Two hundred persons were, killed and more man 500 were wounded. The fighting Ibis week MS touched off by a clash Tuesday between some Palestinians and police patrol. The Phalaoglsts charge that the Palestinians endanger Lebanon by their guerrilla op- erations against Israel from bases in southern Lebanon, The .Palestinians charge that the Pfialangfsts are'trying to drive them out of the country or im- pose restrictions on guerrilla activity that would kill the Pal. esttne liberation movement The tension and periodic out- breaks of fighting have hurt Lebanon's tourist trade and Beirut's image as tte stable fi. nancial center of tte Arab world. Schools, banks and business establishments have been closed. Shopkeepers have struck in support of one or the other faction. Postal service and transit trade at the port have been disrupted since March. Some foreign com- panies have indicated ftey might have to leave Beirut un- less conditions improve. Elsewhere in tte Middle East: The Cairo newspaper Al Ah- ram reported that Libya has granted the Soviet Union army, naval and air bases on Libyan territory in exchange for Soviet 'agreement to sell the Libyans billion worth of tanks, mis- siles and other of me ''latest sophisticated arms In the Soviet arsenal." Because of the very bad rela- tions between Col. Moammar Khadafy and President Anwar Sadat of Egypt, tte big Soviet arms sale to Libya, was certain to increase .Egyptian dis- pleasure' with the Soviet Union. An Egyptian political magazine claimed In early May that Khadafy is building a tine of fortifications along the Libyan- Egyptian border as a prelimi- nary to invading Egypt and uniting the two countries by force. By J. D, HOLMES ised briefing were of his Associated Press Writer ftp special prosecutors Dick HELENA (AP) A grand Dzivi and Donald N. Eastman, jury of 10 women and nine They, along with special prose, men, the first impaneled In toe cutor James A. Bascue, are'ex- Capilal City in nearly 26 years, pected to handle "the: state's has started its secrecy-cloaked presentations to the jurors, investigation, of past irregula. Woodahl said the decision to rities in Montana's program of ieep toe names of tte jurors compensating job-injured work- secret' was made to protect Bien, them from pressures and In. Trafficac- There were 18 000 disabling Atfy' Gen- L' Woodahl quiries. He asked for. coopera, cidents during the long Me- injuries last year and 25 200 in annomicec! on that U ju- fion of the news media in not mortal Day weekend will cause 1973, Kuykendall added.' mrs and eight alternates were attempting to unearth juror between 400 aad 500 deaths and sworn in by Dist. Court Judge mines or to publicize names of to' disabling ia- estimates are based on Gordon R. Bennett Thursday persons seen entering or leav- juries, the National. Safety Previous statistics and current morning and officiaUy began ing the grand jury rooms, Council estimates, traffic trends. proceedings mat afternoon. Council Estimates 400-500 Fatalities traffic trends. The 7BJiour holiday 'period begins at 6 p.m. local time to- day and lasts'until midnight Monday. BSR. m would'drive -.aboulMfce billion said Thursday that there mire mlies during toe period. .392 fatatities during last year's Traffic .figures for the first "We don't try to overstate it, to hit it on the Kuykendall sail He holiday motorists proceedings mat afternoon. At a 45-minute news confer, ence in tte third-floor court- room of the Federal Building In Helena, Woodahl said names of the from Lewis and ,-ttei made public. He said Bennett, as required Memorial Sewkes Are Set Memorial Day wekend. In three months by law had aopointed" aTore. Wle 5 kfctalities man for the flrstgrand jury to Veterans of Foreign Wars lowered to 55 miles per hour on over tte same period last year be convened the nation's highways, there he said, but .remained 21 per Juiy 25 were 539 traffic fatalities to- cent lower, than for the first quarter of 1973. With Woodahl Pitcher Lefty Grove Dies of Heart Attack 1 NORWALK, Ohio (AP) fantastic .682 winning per- teammates? Did I yell at Joe Lefty Grove, the Hall .of Fame centage, compiled a 3.06 earned Cronln (Boston Yes pitcher who- had a sizzling fast- run average and registered sir. Guess I did. I was out there ball and a trigger temper, is 266 strikeouts. He won 20 to win. Thai's the only way to dead. He was 75. games or more in a season play the game. Yes sir." eight times, won 31 against just The 6rfoot-3 Grove, born in four losses in 1931 when he equaled an American League reco rd of 16 straight victories. Post No. 497 and American Le- gion Post No. 31 will observe Memorial Day, Monday, May 26 wiUi short services to be conducted at the court bouse lawn veterans' memorial be- ginning at 11 a.m. The Rev, CalvinFahrion, pas- tor of the First Presbyterian Cfcurch will give the invoca- tion and prayers of the day. adjutant Cortland Hilla in charge of the firing dead. He was 75. Robert Moses Grove died Thursday at his home. Cause of death was listed as a heart at- tack. Of his famous left arm, Grove once said, "the old boy just played out on me after 20 years, 17 In the big leagues." In those 17 major league sea- sons, with the Philadelphia Ath- letics and Boston Red Sox be- fore he retired In Grove posted a 300-140 record for a Lonaconing, Md., on March 6; 1900, began his pro career with Martinsburg of the Blue Ridge League'in 1920 and the moved up to the old Baltimore Orioles of the International League after just part of a season. He then jmmand the color guard. Members of both organiza- ODS will meet al the Vets a.m. and march yes wh Indian Ed Panel Conducts Meeting Of his speed, he'sald, "If I ever hit a guy on the head with a fastball, he'd be through. Of course, I was just a little wild. -------r That made the hitters stay Uniore before joining Phia- loose." delphia in 1925, where be re- As for his temper, Grove naained for nine top seasons. said, "Did I get sore at my Grove was found slumped over a chair by his daughter-ill- law, Mrs. Robert Grove, with members are p'm' pick Club at The Weather The Havre Public Schools In- dian Education Committee held a special meeting on Wednes- day and committee members Warren Matte, Bruce .Meyers, Sharon Grant, Viola England, Madeline Clchosz, Gilbert Parker, Joe Yellow Robe, and Glorratne Clchosz were present. The primary purpose of the meeting was to meet with Bob Parsley, Indian Education Sup- ervisor in the office of the State Superintendent of Pdblic In- stuctlon. Parsley explained that fund- ing for next year was uncertain at this time, but local com- rnltlees should plan programs based on about the same amount of money.that was received this year. He emphasized that all Johnson-O'Malley programs roust be based on the needs of Indian students In school, Pars- ley also discussed the com- mittee's Interest In developing a program relative to child abuse and neglect and suggested some sources of assistance, Frank Bacon, president of the Northern Montana College In- dian Club, presented a request to the committee for fundinff assistance to finance the Pow- Wow scheduled for May 24, 25 and 26. Mrs. Bacon assured the committee that students would be Involved at all levels In the pro- gram and Mr. Parsley stated that his office would approve the committee's supporting this ac- tivity. The to approve granting support to this program. The committee discussedpos- slble use of some finds re- maining In this year's budget with Parsley, and he encouraged them to consider summer tu- torial and recreational activi- ties for Indian students. Bruce Meyers, Madeline Billy, Blor- ralne Cichosz and Warren Mat- te agreed to meet Dr. Ray Peck, local assistant superin- tendent of schools, oa Tuesday, May 27 at for the pur- pose of developing new program proposals, The committee discussed var- ious Items with the two com- mittee members from Rocky Boy and Stan Jamruszka, Rocky Boy Indian Education Specialist, relative toprogramdevelopment that would Involve pupils attend- ing school In Havre who reside on the Rocky Boy Reservation. her in her room as was Ms practice in the late afternoon. Besides his daughter-in-law, Grove is survived by a daugh- ter, Mrs. Edward Monett of Ambridge, and Mrs. Bes- sie Peter son. of Dunbar, W.Va.; a granddaughter; three great- granddaughters and several nieces and nephews. His son, Robert Grove, died in 1972. The body will taken to Lena- coning early Sunday and burial will be held in Frostburg, Md., Monday. Scouters Schedule Cleanup Boy Scout, Cub Scout and Girt Scout units will conduct a city- wide cleanup Saturday, May 24. The groups will meet at9 a.m. at tne Girl Scout House and each unit will be assigned a certain area and be responsible for their assignment in picking up litter and hauling It to the-dump. MVRE m> "ear la ve i MONTANA FORECASTS Partly cloudy with scattered showers, mostly mountains, to- day; windy along eastern slopes; scattered showers, windy and cooler Saturday; highs today 60 to 70; lows tonight 35 to 45; highs Saturday 50s west, 60s east. West of the Divide Mostly cloudy with scattered showers through Saturday; windy at times Saturday; highs both days lows tonight 35 to 45. On Record I DEATH Vernon U Hill, 86, Kremlin, on May 23, in a local hospital unit. r   

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