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Anaconda Standard Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1911 - Page 1

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Publication: Anaconda Standard

Location: Anaconda, Montana

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   Anaconda Standard (Newspaper) - September 14, 1911, Anaconda, Montana                                WEATHER FORECAST. THURSDAY. Fair.1 WEATHER FORECAST. FOR FRIDAY, Fair. VOL. 11, ANACONDA, 'MONTANA, THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 14, 1911. PRICE FIVE GENTS. JOir.VSOX CONFESSES IIP. KIIIVAJ'UU jtNI> MTTIiH: AX- GETS LIFE SENTENCE ink en Info court, KiiMfy and hunt I oil uwiiy (o wtnlo jirlnon In avoid molt, ivhieh he foured rrmild lynch den Impnlnc cniinrd tlirt-d, lie only on Munplt'lon and o ro n HOC tin: e v I d n n r n izn I nut htm. PIONEER PRIEST HONORED Madison, WIs., Sept. J. Jolin- non, otherwise known us "Dog.Hkln" Johnson, this evening: confessed to the AbductIr.n and murder of Annio Lcin- brrger, T years old. wlKine body wns found In Lako M minim last Saturday morning. Ho was immediately sentenced jby .Tudtre Anthony Donovan to life 1m- tprisnunient. A fmv minutes after his confession and fipiHoncc .Tohn.son was taken in an auto- mobile by Sheriff Hrown and n di-puly throtiph sldo KtrectH nnd across the enmi- ty at a rapid rate nf ppeecl to tho stntf> pOTiftentifiry at Waupun. This profit out pccrccy was maintained lest Johnson bo lynched. ITe was taken Into custody Saturday on suspiclnn, but after ho IiHil boon questioned he was ivlfHseil. Officers lippt him under survetllnnee nil day and in the evening took him into custody apt in and field hfm unrl'-r sus- picion. AHhoueh officers snppected John- pnn nf knowiriR" Koniotliinp about tho rrlmo, they could not fasten the pu'lt nn him. HH (lie ptronffth or siipplrlon he was tnken Into court today. Ho plendod not Kullfy and was plarocj under a the preliminary I'xamlnntfnn pot for The prisoner wns tlvn Ink-Mi hip roll, hurrylncr in n ninnner nhonfl nf tlm Toward' even In R1 Deputy FTrnry Vac" tvnp rnlV'1 by .Tohnpon, who said ho wish- ed tn lu1 a co Inn. rnunty rblef nf and Ofllciolr sron unthomd nt the roil r dinner- n tn] in a fow minutes tho WHS I'lniinvnn. .Johnson then tb" brtitnl or! me. An attorney by Ihn cmirt tn defend tilt' f but In view of the It v us- nnly a few minutes before thf MGR. PETEn DE SIKRE. Afraid of the Mnli. hrondr.il in bis at tho pn- 1lfe all ilny following his arnilrrn- In th.- morn inc. Abandoning his k-Fsty. if fhf-ro were rtntic'T nf n mob. Finally, nvprmtiK- by emntjnn. bo threw HIP Tllblo h" wns Into ;i rnrnor and railed turnkey. derlarlnir that ho wnp wMl- Ine to Ml .-ill. In tho nf nf Pollen 1 ATtnrnoy nnd Turnkey Foyo. Jnlmsnn paid that the wns the result nf n snd.lon impulse. TTo had thmnph (he bedroom the prlrl nnd her sister undress nt bod- time nn different nornslnns. On tho tal ntq-ht. about 10 nVlork. shortly tbo ehlMrrn had nMoop. fi" raised the snsh nnd snatrhorl lltlle from the bnd. draRRori her throutrh tb- window nnd knocked ln-r on tho with his flKt. roniterInK ber nnoonprln pn there would be no ontory. lie tlion tonk her to the railroad bridge and, after lilttlnpr hrr nn the bond until life wns OT- tlnct. threw the body into the lake. Johnson he did not want to mako n. dptfilled confession.'because ho wanted tn on ITTs way to the pnnltentlary to avoid mob violence. Ho said ho would maUo, n written confession after be had been lodged In prison. Testimony nt the Inquest wns rnnfllet- !nf? In ffiat one phypieinn wns of thr njiln- Inn that the child had been npsnultod whilo another ox pressed an opposite view. Mnitf of Pnnlnhniont. Life Imprisonment is ITTe maximum pun- Jshment meted nut to murderers In "Wis- consin. Johnson onro served a term hi the pen- Itontlnry and several years ago ho was put. In thn Mfintlnta hospital fnr (lie In- sane, after lie. hful nKsnultr-d n lltllo fflrl nt Brownsville. "vTIs. .Tnhnson lived but n few flooiR from the T.emhe.rtrer homo. The father of tho murdered slrl told tho police that ho nnd Johnson had n quarrel once, but he hewltntod tn rh.nrpo tho crime to him. Tt wns largely because no othm- solu- tion offered that the police held Jnhn- pon. GODSPEED TO TAFT BY BUSINESS MEN RARE HONORS FOR FATHER DE SIERE Butte Priest Invested With Office of Do mestic Prelate in Accord With Papal With Acclaim by Clergy and Layman at Ceremony and Banquet. Kevorly. Mass.. Sopt. and tho assurance of the support, nf Now England buFlncFS IntcrcstK were thn (if flicer carried to Pres- ident Taft today by Robert 51. Oavid- son of Mass., pn-piili-nL of the New Hnglanrl AssociatioTi of Com- nu-rclal and SO members of that association, who motored to pfira- matta to Hay to chief ox- ccutlve before he starts West. "As you pi) out from amoiiK us on your IMHI; and arduous tour." paid Mr. Davidson, "we want ym to KO with tho Godspeed of Xew England rinKliiK In your carp. Other sections may waver, but we will not. You arc president and as sur.h are entitled U> our sym- pathy, our loyalty and our unfaltering trust. And you have this in abundjint Mr. Davidson uppmved the p resi- dent's course on reciprocity, his pulic.-y of conservation and his determination that the tariff shall be revised only when a non-partisan body shall have reported that reductions Hre war- ranted. After Mr. Davidson concluded, the president shook hands wHh the clolc- FTates and mado a short speech, sayinjf: "I am very much touched by your coming" hero to bid me Clod speed on thlK trip which I am to take. 1 am pn- Inft- to do the bent T run on this trip to talk to the people nn the Issues of day, not almie the present issues, for there uro a great ninny issues that it is well for the ppnple to consider head j that do not aftract politicians at all. They are the issues that do no tlgrure In the headlines nnd yet contribute j much to the welfare, of the. people, nnd i It is well for the people to understand them. "I not referred to the issues to which your clyilnnim and spokes- man touched on with BO much elo- quence because I do not think it neces- sary. Regarding reciprocity, the arbi- tration treaties and the tariff board, you know where I stand and it Is not necessary to convlnco thosf; who ire of the same opinion that I am." The president received guests on the front, lawn and Mr. Davidson spoke from a little hillock. In beginning nddrcss, he said that the delegates -present represented 28 commercial organizations In six states and that he, acting as "business spokesman for more than people." He said in part; "We have watched your course in the White House and before the people and aro tistied If you have made mistakes they arc the mistakes of an honest man who had rather do some- thing1 be wrong than do nothing and be right. "The welfare of our great working class as well as of capital Is essential to our development as a people that we desire as business men conservative action in all matters tending: material- ly to alter the basis upon which our prosperity rests. "Wo believe tlyit the American peo- ple were, never better housed, better fed, better clothed, and, as a rule, bet- tor paid than today and we are anxious that If any changes are contemplated in our industrial condition they shall be made after a thorough investigation by a strictly non-partisan board of men whose, findings shall not bo col- ored by tho desire for political suc- cess but rather by a sincere desire to improve upon splendid civilization we already boast." Yucatan, Mexico, Sept. Eight men were killed and 16 wounded when the state guards fired into a special trnin of oxcurHlonisiH coming to join in the manifestation last night to Francisco T. Madero. According to the authorities, tin- owrHloniHiH were, to blnmi-. An Indul- gence In ton much Intoxicants had lifted the onthusliifim on (ho train to n hlnh pitch. As the iraln, loaded in Us capacity, was onturlng (ho cily, I'lo. visitors saw thp guards, and, it 'is re- porled, Imgatr firing, killing a. child. Tho guunlH niuirncd thn lire, (in ar- V'ounl of tho crowded condition or' tho otU'hi'.H, almost ove'ry bullet hit a pns- Although ibis r resulted in the fnjalKipn. 1 ut nf a sorloH nf Ihm. marlcpil M-.i- drro'a riUr-rtirnincnt. The iniinHVsCi- llon nrrciinlxcd by supp'Tlers of Moreno Bunion, Ihe oiipnslHon candl- for ifovernor. Kfirly In tho nrienumn tin- Moreii- iHlns I nrrlvliur Iti special irtUnn. Mchvecn thiM fiu'tlon and (he '-Minu- IH bll.lrr CITY UNDER SEIGE MISSIONARIES SAFE Poklnp, Sept. advices re- reived hy the Chinese foreign board and the foreign legations Indicate that Clieng- tu. eapitn] of province, is under nietfe; that most. If not all, tho mission- aries aro insffle tiio walls and Hint the rity is fjiimanned by 1.SOO troops, who have hnd several ens.'iKoments with forces. A dispatch frnm the prefect of the Su- chnii. dntod Sept. 12, says that the troops wore Hrlny "n the from tho OhouKtu walls nnd that the besiegers had lust many men. The belief is hold there thai the garrison Is capable of resisting the attacks of any mmihi.'r of rebels from, the outside. The Suolmu 75 miles from Chonprtu. The f'nnridtiin Methodist com pound within tin1 city has open spares; around Its own wnlls. It is believed that the for- (Igners tnken refuge wfthln this pnmpoiind, which" b: considerod strong- ojtslly d.'ffiidi'd. IvkliiK u Im 1 In fn1. mor riots In CiH-iU'.l'.i that whenever f'hl- disposed tn Kunnl the mission would be a tinned outside iho nnd not permit tod to get within 11n- K.UI-S. Wbeth'.M' Hie fore'gners nn fives inside tho wnll.t are prepared (o endure 'r-n Is tint known. Thn question of is all iinpnrlniif and it Is proba- ble, f'fuu rusi extM-rlenciep. that the mis- InKfll plveailt lOHH URIllllRt r-h ,-i i-rrii mli'slotmrlt's. wi'ver, hnvi I bom MUppMrd bv tho Kvory i-ITorl Is lichiK niii ulcnto with Hlu'iiKlu, but s< K on no mm't'inoiil in Hf nn co ibiltly nf llu- viceroy to   forerunner of other outbreak.1. In different parts of the Flowery kingdom, for the fact Is that the struprRlo now go- ing on is really n gigantlo tout of the rel- ative strength and power of the central government, as opposed To the provincial government; Jn other words, the sltua- tlnn resembles the great feudal wars of Europe in liio ages. Japan also had to pass through a similar ordoaT he.- fon> the i-mperor was able to break tho power of bis mutinous barons, and It Is believed the government will now be pnl In the Fame Ifst. While the. sympathy of occidental na- llons must remain with the Chinese cen- tral government, Micro can no Inter- ference in fMs great {ntornnl strife., and I ho activities of other nations, at lonst for the present, must bo confined to the prolectlon of their own citizens resident In China. Amid scenes long remembered be- cause of the love and respect mani- fested on every hand, Father De Siere, for 18 years past a pastor In Butte and for 44 years a priest, was yesterday morning invested as a domestic prelate in a service marked by solemn silence at St. Patrick's church. The news was pealed out to Butte at a. m., when the church bells were tolled an- nouncing that the first Butte priest had received the coveted title of mon- Helgneur. Following the procession from the priests' house at o'clock, led by church dignitaries, the clergy formed around the altar. With Father De Sicre as the central Jigure of a group of 40 clergymen, the lit. Rev. John P. Carroll, bishop of Helena, celebrated pontificial mass and was followed by the Rev. Father Bateus, St. 'Lawrence church, who read the papal bull creat- ing him a prelate. H read: "To Our Beloved Son, Peter De Siere, rector of Kt. Patrick's parish, diocese of Helena, health anti apostolic bene- diction: "During his recent visit to Rome our venerable brother, the bishop of Hel- ena, commended you to u.s a.s a priest distinguished both for the luster of your virtues and for a singular gra- cJousne.ss which has endeared you to all classes of your people. He also in- formed us of the services you have rendered in his diocese; how, long ago, you left Belgium, your native land, to preach the gospel in distant Mon- tana, and how, after years of intelli- gent and zealous work In the sacrer] ministry, you have won for yourself the respect and favor of your whole community. "Moved by this high praise and yield- ing to the wishes of our venerable brother, thu bishop of Helena, we de- sire to bestow upon you a special mark of our Approval. "Therefore, by- these letters, wo make, nppolnt nnd declare you a pre- late of the pontificial household. We grant you. beloved son, the right to wear the purple and, oven in the Ro- man curia, to use tho rochet and to enjoy each and every honor, privilege, prerogative and indult which those having the same title enjoy, every- thing to the contrary notwithstanding. "Given at Home under tho seal of the fisherman, June 39, 1911, in the eighth year of our pontificate. "PIUS X. "R. CARD. MERRY DEL VAL, Sec- retary of State." The priests in attendance and their offices were: of honor, the Rov. J. Van Den BroecU and the Very Rev. S. J. Sullivan, D. D. Assistant priest, the Very Rev. seigncnr Day, V. G. Notary, the RRV. F. X. Batens. Deacon of mass, the Rev. M. AIc- Cormick. Sub-deavon, the Rev. Joseph Venus. First acolyte, the Rev. James Franchf. Second acolyte, tho Rov. M. Donohue. Miter hearer, the Rev. AI. Pirnat. Crozier bearer, the Rev. Daniel Foley. Thurl Landy. ferarlus, the Rev. Thomas FORTUNE IN BULLION IS AB.OARD WRECK OF RAMONA Rfiiuli', Ilic ntrnmrr Hnninmi ronnctoivd off SpnnlKh lolnnil. Aliinkii, Insl Kinidny, slm carried' ilnwn wl'.h lior, of Kolrt liulllon Iroin Ilio Trendwcll mlnti for Snn Fran- clsro. Tho ship in wilier Hint In iisiinily smooth, and II IN Ili'oiiKlH (ho Ironwiro will ho rcoovorrifl cnslly, Tim Htwimrr wllh Iho IxiMSf-iiKf-rs und crew of Iho Homoim, In liio In Sonditi Inlo tomorrow. Incense bearer, the Rev. L. IFnCrory. Hook bearer, tho Rev. p. J. Crawley. Candle bearer, the Rev. M. Slattery. Gremearl, the Itev. James Nolan. Cross bearer, the Rev. si. J. Lynch. Cmitores, the Ttov. John Pirnat and the Rev. J. L. Mcllullen. blaster of ceremonies, the Rev. Will- lam r. Joyce; assistant master of cere- monies, the Kev. C. G. Follet. SerTlcc a< St. Surrounded hy a of priests, the most representative in the state, while rich, and poor, old and youner, knelt before the nltar, tho Most Hev. Bishop Carroll, representing ;he pope, conferred on Father De Siere yes- terday morning the distinguished title of domestic prelate. This act, the fit- ting: conclusion to the pontifle'al mass, impressive In the extreme, concluded the church's ritual. FnllowliiR the conferring of the title Bishop Carroll paid an eloquent tribute to the recipient. Ho told of his mis- sions in Belgium and tho determina- tion of the young priest to come to the West. He closed with a splondlil tribute to tho IS years Father De Siero spent In Butte. Following tlic ceremony the church hell was loudly tolled to apprnise nil Butle that honor had been .confer- red. From the church doors trooped the procession of children, priests, bishop and the newly created prolate. At the priest's house n scene of ani- mation was then in progress. Hun- dreds crowded to congratulate Mon- selguour De Slero who wllli the sim- plicity characteristic of man found expression In simple words of blessing. Tho church hod been beautifully decorated for the occasion and when the procession wound Its .way into tho odlfico myrlnd lights graced the scene. Streamers of purple decked with, gold sunflowers covered tho pillars. nave, nnd aisles wore decorated in a similar manner. The bishop's throne erected for tho oeonslon was decorated In clahornto fashion. drcds watched the humble father a lie received the honor. As the bisho; spoko the words of praise every knci was bent and every head was bowe r repeal. An rrror discovered in the report glvon officially by the clerk of the town of Limestone eontrihuled largely to the 1111- certninty nn to tlie outcome. Tt wag dis- covered that the clerk of that town re- turned to tho associated press over his signature, "for repeal. Ill; against, 17.V To the secretary of stiitt- he roportod just the reverse, for repeal ITS; against, 12. The of the total vote, as fiir- nished from the ofllcc of the .secretary of state, are: For repeal, against, M.MO. Between the associated press rot urns as re.vifiefl almost completely hy postal card reports from town and city clerks and the lipures of the secretary of stato (hero is a marked discrepancy. Tho press returns Indicated at a late hour tonight a majority of 3-17 aprnlnst repeal. Tho to- tal vote as Indicated by the associated prrss returns Is; For repeal, against, 60.5RS. Tn view of the elosonpss of tho vote, it was believed tonight that only tho clal canvass by tho governor and council would dfflnltoly determine the renuu. IIOMIQ. Sprlni; Lake, .1., Sopt, VlnlPted of Maine ended abruptly lu- nlght Htuy ut the conforenro nf gov- ernors and left for AMKHHIH, to In lonrh the NltmiHnn HUT" rewriting from Iho rlccllnn to divide ih- fato of prohibition In lh> state lion. Iln wild he would prohnMy cull an onrly mectlnff nf thr board of to dotormlno definitely tho vote. Under Maine laws lho.ro nrn Iwn sets of returns, one fllod with tho urcrrtary of state and opened immediately, the other, sealed and opened by the governor and council. The latter Is authentic, but I sometimes It takes two weeks to get the complete returns. MORIS WEATHKR FREAKS. Kansas City, Sept. ex- perienced the hottest September day In its history. At Sallna and Con- oordia temperatures of 104 decrees were ro.conled. Junction City recorded 103. Other points had equally liig-h, records. REPLY OF SE1I 10 Paris, sept. Alter President Fal- lieros liud sivon Mm formal sanction to the, Frencli reply to Germany's counter proposals in thn Moroccan negotia- tions, Foreign Minister M. Do Selves completed tho transcription of the document and it was dispatched to Herlin by special courier at 10 o'clock tonight. According to information from a re- liable source, the reply Is practically n rovlsi-il and rnrroetocl of iln1 proposed Fninrn-Clernmn treaty live to Morocco which wits 1 to tho Cierman mlnlsiei- n.i Sept. 4. Tin1 KI turned a duplicate of M. Cmnljon, the Krench i: revised Mreiirilliu nf Cerui'iny. a minihiT Tn n 1; IN ply auain ITIK the artlele.s perial government or itinemllnir deleting tho articles Itmurted thAt povornmp.nl. Thn Frencli roply (iccoplN certain Herman which do not kpvnlvc the qucHllon of principle, r.i i.-. i V i lllM.I- thiii I' riMirh re- rlthor ivim-nrporiil- iMjtlv.ssrd hy the itn- the in nay,   

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