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Anaconda Standard: Monday, May 1, 1911 - Page 1

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   Anaconda Standard (Newspaper) - May 1, 1911, Anaconda, Montana                                 WEATHER FORECAST.  MOM) AT-  Fair and warmer.  WEATHER FORECAST.  TUESDAY,  Fair,  VOL XXII.—NO 240.  ANACONDA, MONTANA, MONDAY MORNING, MAY I, Itll  PRICE FIVE CENT8.  ara tun»!  MCK ll UST  lit .I' % 11 *» **IM)AA F %T \l ITII'J I' '♦'*  I IIH M OX HONSA LA AAI A ll A ll,IIH ti) IM tit.  SEVEN URE TEACHERS  PACKF.R WHO WON’T TFSTIFY  to  , — til  ' % §»#■**(«* ll  of  llljllt I II, (not* In I*  Two mort* Tlclliw* or**  •Hr of I hr I r* lw|t»rii (Iiour killed oimI fninll)  I! I |*lo»l*»»» of KO* jilnrr inrnr lim** after the wfffl. Heller rd (hot mil* spread nod cnnifil train to >.n o%rr hunk. EI«ht prPM*rte hunted ti* de©»h.  Ha rf on. Pa possible to a scene of th**  were burn* «l jtirrd. tv-f «*t that thr|r Ii' scori a of j * t * bruised In IC ■ peris! from ton, I*. C . (liv 1*1011 of ll Martin’*< Cr* noon Th* lino v •lay. lion*** taken fr Ins crew The rn f tim <  MHS i.•{«.fin r.  .MIS* friend Mrs MI**  I **M • ll-Mi*!  t< it. ii*  M im  Apr! rf H . . Id*  a  * I* t fi** *.n?»  I Im  Iii* .n I .* I** * k.  rn  lins «i  *.HIK.  th** d  v. r*  reek  a, V ..* in  •nosy N J .  •rojief ight J  •hr!  V\ <>  cut. tx  of th* Y„ to Udder©-Iv nn.i r  (IHI ill  if |h r?  f.ttally In* sty -nil;*'' » d of. aud burred and ton* iou s* Washing-DHhw ,i|lron*l if  SM IS SLI MEXICAN ageNTS    PHCBL pm  TO BEGIN PARLET nr  (Mill ill Iii lf\    _________  Gomez Named Commissioner at Meeting of Insurrecto Chiefs—Await Credentials of Diaz Envoy—Expect President's Power Be Little After the Reform Starts.  tit,lOHiTt oc it* <«»ti ti ii re: f re  01*1*0*1 ,1) to ii I ( IFK I" IM  til* t**• RH.  STOKE TO EXPLAIN IT  hi ‘•im;*"* <1,1 rn»t ttn Hi .Of of RhMDF.tf KS III,*T Rot CI) lit THC Kl THC*.  REPORT THREE DEAD  OO t  Mf! IIM IO  Iii (iii* lion*** lh** lie moors Hr nm* jorit> I* keeping tip r fn«<t |»n**r. Trylns l«* sri fnrtnfrV (rn* 11 • t of wn> rn noon n* f»ow»H»le« Kcl to textile «rl»»*doIrs. tc«t ilr iii or rn Hr rnlr*—*t on xii iii. lions of tm ti es Ion nod truoaa un* to rome a* soon.  Washington, April .lo Titre vv.<>ks fif the extraordinary session **f th* Hitty*is*l( otti cot ;rc*f* hit')rn* pa as"*! Into history with a re * ord *»f i ii alfin* legislation by the house. th*- *-* n at** ie finally organised, but in no haste to consider that part of the democratic programme air*.uh dis-  11.1 cd «if  WTT ii I Of til*  it ti  alit  at  A1  •,*1 and v t *day In doting ;i i to the • ugh it - p* it don of the I lorn jr., pr* sident of ernment. announced  no  at  illtri r>* th** insnrre irogramnir to federal k't  © envoys. At  nr*  f*»r to <  I 1)0  iv* rn th**  nf* renc*. FT an lh** pr*. th*- e|** ( *  P*n,  : mr a rn p pr* -neat ron-clsco I . ieiomi i tlon by  est< rd ny aft r*  I fur t rn the to. roll * ha\•    i**    •    I  md th* wreck  rk  tip  iii  rn;  in t -■ h .spit WA LH KH.  'N ft.  HCSAN SKSSH .f the tea h* I * vl A It V Al.CHN Cli* I SOCHIA K N« )LT,  IU. t,  I t  ut#  J Warrant**  I Tilden, th** i * Ie. 'TR** Al «'illuming*, i ordered hy | ll!., a* a dr •f the tim  *u hor no * of  committee. I**nry of I  a* CV od HK re u -p  a . ii * i w **r> Ie Id  Sear* and .l**hi Olin *‘l for H*ivvi*  itier men. lone eon* h**t vv *•• n Na t ii * ti od  i Barton Payne of rd Tilden and the other Lorimor witness©* who have h* **n declared In * ontempt of the state -.tilt*, for refil ing to appeal before ti* ll* Im investigating committee in Springfield and ten what th* v know * .a <<ming tin* $1 *k»,* **■ * • slu-h" fund, of v ii • Ii Tilden iv .-upposed to have bi* ii tho treasurer.  I,*n isi, i.ini>HitM sn. rn  VB V Ll .It IN KS It A ItH V AV (LM KH. baggage muster .»r th*-J A Al IJH Flit iv NEU tourist ag* ut for th* 1  !*< road  NI «* ELK V N t * It i■ a* h# r in tti* Cth tv ALTE ll \ V N<  , Utica Ti* 111 H ti * in Phil  HUS) IV!  Id. ip!) .1  nia rail*  Bl TU KB F« 'IU'  agin* el <>’ CHA RLE*  t roods*.-inr  11 ;i  KH  St t.\  t  •rn  V U HM I I.V !.  eft fid 111 >|v in  M I *. re* un  Son !><*d N* it   1  the  • I * I V  I ti  MIDDIES RESENTING CHARGE OF RUDENESS  v \ \ OU K civ vt i tic ut hi \ vi•;  FOH III RKH % A IOU lot* till)  A (It Mi At UM A A.  TROUBLE BECAUSE GIRL  WORKED FOR HER LIVING  MHD ARMY OFFICER JUMPS FROM FRUIN  I It A Mf I ** I ll ROK. ll IM I I MAN AV I \ -  dom aa dim; ooiMi Tinier*  Al 11.1-> A \ HOI It.  THEN WANDERS HALF CLAD OVER DESERT TILL DEATH  by the lower branch. Canadian reciprocity Im the only matter now being considered by the .“enate and that probably will n*>t rome before it for several week* The Anan*, committee, to which It wa* referred, w ill grant hearing* "ti thr- hill How long committee deliberation will eon* Untie Im problematical, but the prospect is for a lengthy dis* amnion.  chairman Penrone of th* committee i in favor of th*- bill, but th** majority Is opposed to it Tho prevailing opinion Is that it will a* reported w Ith recoin monition Tho commit tee will meet Tuesday.  Stone lr. explain Hill.  I!  un. oiiiitiunl the accident that th** rail* ?  I '•air. to 1« av • t ii* an embank naut.  at w..rk al the pr It I* raid th  I ! it no MRO  th*  pr*  th** general b I and caused •re k and j hinge Tra k men ha«i im of • !u* disaster tracks were la* k**d I wa* out ami that  .I r** • .lf f ii. f th* »V er  .■•« ll  and  up,  I lie Ie ir  AA a at Ant bory ! of thr t* ndetl in adorn; blam** f "Th* re  i n g t *  ii i* o Mi Mf  Ilia  Th*  burg  middl* ► *f anob-- rmatii  not t  engineer, belle Af lug he had t track, rushed Into what proved to be a death trap < *f th* HH* pa**, tigers, only s f- w row remain ic ar th** -• * ti** of th** wr**> k, mo**    those    abb* to Cavel  having returne*! lo I'tlca and Syracuse last. night and t »*lay.  Th** explosion that O' curred at the wreck last night whs due to the Ignition of gas in a t tnk under lh* dining . I', th* «»nlv our which did not go Into “On th t a* ditch    I    man    who  ti:* in - iii i I.. M is* a nut ion- vv id. nu.* of this whol. affair,** .“aid < cadets, who will he graduate academy next month. "It midshipman who attempted llsh a s*>Hal wall barling  It i  *d  i H* sc- im one d fr  VV -1 K  to I gi  the I o  iou  t he the not a  stab-I v. ho na v a I  • Kell ST St il>s  Ethan and*. Jtm I ' it ion Ba  Ev anthem, morning.  I, I ’I ah, April Sh ’A Ii ii** tem-v Insane a the result of *x-d:inking. J.uii.-h IL Robbins, vinr- a s» t g**aut of the United arna, on his way from Fort Alh n, Vt., to th** Philippine Isl. lunip* I from the window* of a  ifle train 35 mil \Vv at 3 o’ ami eight hours  es east of clock this later was miles from  Senator Stone of Missouri will address tho senate tomorrow* on the bill  1  and endeavor to explain some of the mf.representations that have been i u,ade regarding the proposed agr*-*- * ment Atter this speech there will be nothing before the senate, and adjournment until Thursday is probable. with adjournment until Monday to fol love.  There Is no prospect of the senate i consul* ring th** house hills providing for popular election of senators, pre* j election publicity of campaign contr!- ; tuitions, or reapportionment until the j re. iproeity Issu* has been decided. t  In the h*mse the democrats are  1  keeping dp the rapid legislative pace, j ami most of th* coming week will I"' devoted to th** fanners’ free list bill.  Chairman Underwood demonstrated bis desire to hasten action and also to give rh members a chance to be < heard by Insisting upon ll o'clock as the hour to convene Instead of noon.  It is probable that debate will close Thursday or Friday. That It will pass there la no doubt, the democrat!* 1  support being almost solid, reinforced by j the votes of a few progressive repub- I  deans.  I * ii I / e 11 Forget* V-n Rule.  ballot of Hr Francisco Vnsque* Ch m ; Francisco Madero sr, and Senor -f * * ** * Bino Suarez as the peace commission* J cr* of the revolutionary party.  AV’Ith the provisional governors pre-*- ! (•ut of the various state* in which the Insurgents have organised their government. a definite bas!" of peace terms wa* agr**Sd upon. It was admitted that thor© may be many breakers ahead.  The first obstacle, It is believed, will be rn* t when Senor Ca rn baja I, head of th** federal peace commission, arriv s here, which Is expected to be tomorrow night,  The Insurgents will want to know exactly Av hat powers have been bestowed upon Sen r t’arabajal. It is understood here, for instance, that Senor Branlflf and Senor Obregon, who have been go-betweens In the negotiations hitherto, will act with Senor t'arahajal, but In what capacity is not know*n to the Insurrecto leaders. Should It develop that Senor (’ar aba Jal is to be th* sole envoy with plenary powers, the insurrecto? will Invest I»r. Homa* with similar credentials. Francisco Madero sr. and Senor Snare* acting In an advisory capacity.  To Kitriul A rut lot Ice Annin.  .AP  IHT ITV (  mission*! Franeb ared ti’,*  < en iii tin fed r thorough! -It ath*n.  pr-  .* not  Ie cl-  .f the dona! j  t. it  Ft a i  iou  ■al  . (thou Mad* r.  I forces  . rf,(to ii iv < rn  Id ta  . jr that . on  m*nt  (tar  P  as not r<**.. >!-( . en.  however, aaliis fathrr had lunation with  and now wa*  imlliaf with th* political  IRISH SHILLALAH MAKES GAVEL FOR CHAMP CLARK  AA'ajdilngton, April 3c Speaker ‘Mark has another new gavel This one Is of Irish blackthorn root, the h ad a* big as th*.* regulation league baseball, the handle a foot long. Hand-carved shamrock* and harps ornament It Hut the really remarkable thing about the new gavel I* that the knobby handle when held at a certain angle shows a perfect profile of Uncle Joe Cannon, the former speaker of the hour**,  Tho gavel was brought from Kil-larney, Ireland, by the Rev Father O’Brien of St. Thomas* seminary. Hartford, Conn. Ile gave it  f  * Arthur E J. Retlljr of Meriden. »'onn , a son of Representative Reilly of tie* s 1 * ou t Connecticut district, who had  !  pm-*! up and presented it to the Hon. Champ.  Speaker Clark used the "shillnl.th" during the session of the house aud it certainly mad** the sounding hoard ring.  worked for her living from tnt academy dance.  Middle* aa nil ••Ogender."  contrary, it vvas a midship-took this young woman to the dance and it was a naval officer who criticised 1dm for his so-called breach of etiquette. A* a matter of fact, practically cverj* midshipman is by the second-class man .Mis* Hoers lo the hop and Joined by his superiors.''  • •wing to the fact that Academy Bulletin Is subjected most rigid* cannot  standing who took was cen  tile  Navy to a  nsorship. that publication make plain the feeling existing at the academy  Mild Pro tem Published.  In a recent issue, however, a mild protest was allowed to be printed against the manenr in which the penlite country had condemned ail  found (bad at a point four the track.  Although th** train was running at a rate cf 30 mil* an    hour    v hen    th**  mazed man crashed through the Pullman window, ti. print cully escaped uninjured, there being a few cuts about his lac**    and hands.    His    death    was  probably    dm- to exposure,    as he  attired only in his underclothes trousers.    The train    wns    held mor**  than an hour while members of the train cr-w and passengers trailed the man o\>t the desert. A posse of men from the surrounding country then took up the sea reb.  AA’hen found, th*' body bore Indications that Robbins had been in water uv» to his shoulders. His feet won* cut und bleeding from contact with sharp locks and other projections. Ills body was taken to Evanston and from that point vv III he shipped east.  AAith Robbins was his wife and four small children. Thor* was another army officer in the berth vvi th Robbins when he was seized with the frenzy which caused him to jump through the window.  Many members arc smiling at the forgetfulness of Representative Dalzell of Pennsylvania, w!i<- en Saturday attempted to block the effort of the democratic leaders t<> take a recess until Monday to dodge the committee discharge calendar. Mr. Dalzell, who headed the rules was , ,f th.* last congress, had und j that the democratic house had changed the rule relating to motions to discharge committees and made the point of order to Mr. Underwood's motion to recess that a motion to discharge I the pf* tiglon committee from consideration of a bill wns on the calendar.  Air. Underwood called Mr. Dalzell s attention to the new* democratic rules. which contained an amendment pro-, vidlng that no motion to discharge a committee was in order on Mondays after the call of the unanlmous-con-! sent calendar unless it had been filed at least seven*day'* previously.  To Hasten Free Fist.  The Insurrecto leaders are determined that formal negotiations shall not be- ] gin until the federal envoy or envoys present credentials authorizing them to act for the government. Dr. Vasquez Gomez, who has hitherto favored Laredo, Mexico, as the meeting place for the peace negotiations, yielded that point today in fa\*or of the place se-  1  iected near here. It was pointed out to him that to remove the negotiations from here would delay amtters seriously. A* it is. tile armistice probably will have to be extended once more, perhaps for three days, for it is not believed an agreement can be reached before Wednesday noon, when the pres-pnt armistice expires.  The substance of the insurrecto demands Is known in a general way. They Insist on participation in government affairs and point out that th* only Wgy to guarantee it is to place some members of their party in the cabinet and to select at least a dozen of their supporters as provisional governors pending new elections.  AA’hlle ti\c resignation of President Diaz is said to be hardly mentioned in the    insurrecto    demands, the insur  ant!.mitt-** | rectos believe that with a majority forgotten representation in governmental affairs the    personality    of the executive will  not    be of great    importance They em  phasize the fact thta theirs is not a personal quarrel, but a political revolt.  Think Din* Ie nDnc.  Smite Alen Helen n War.  AV’ith til* • xt option of Gen. Pasqual Of oleo, Colonel A' filii and Colonel Blanco, tho"** who attended today’s conference * onstltuted the ; am** little band of men who met just a year ago In Mexico city and formulated the platform of the revolutionist party in the hist election.  The military leaders were lOA'lted to thy conference netvly to ad vis** th # m of the progress of tho negotiations.  The poll11* xI chiefs present were Francisco I. Madero Jr , provisional president of the republic of Mexico; Gonzales Garza, provisional secretary of state; Dr. Vasquez Gomez, diploma ti** agent; Abraham Gonzales, provisional governor of Chihuahua; Senor Maytorena. provisional governor of Sonora; Senro Pino .Suarez, provisional governor of Yucatan; S*'nor Alberto Funetes, provisional governor of Agua nora; Senor Pino Sa aret. provisional governor of Coahulla; Senor Guadalupe Gonzales, provisional governor of Zacatecas, and Senor Juan Sanchez Az-cona, secretary of the diplomatic agency of the insurgents in the United States.  ♦ - •  INTERNATIONAL PLAGUE CONGRESS FINISHES WORK  Peking, April 30 The delegates to the international plague conference. h*jd in Mukden, arrived here today und will la* received in audience by the em- 1  peror tomorrow. They also will be extensively entertained while here.  Th*- results of the investigations* of those attending the conference indicate that the pneumonic plague can easily be controlled and resolutions adopted declare against the discontinuance of I railroad traffic in the future because of the disease. The report that the I Chinese prevented the adoption of certain resolutions in said to be untrue. Tho delegates say the results* which will be published as soon as possible, will he beneficial to the world.  — - •»  —  FOLIA AV A A K UOES EAST.  Ha ng'ir Hang <r i-son* ar h* estimated i the result of raged f..r hour  The democratic to hasten tile free ways and means free to devote’ its  leaders are anxious fist bill, so that the committee may be time to tho revision  One reason for tho absence of any , discussion at pretest concerning I'resl-dent Diaz’s part in the forthcoming transactions! s the fact that thoro are few’ hen* who believe Diaz Intends to continue in the presidency. No one ’ has asst!ranees of any resignation, but the insurrecto* generally declare that other hands are steering the ship of state in the Mexican capital.  A curious Incident of ti\e day's happenings in the insurrecto camp was the  Washington. April 30.—A cold wave n iw over the Northwest will travel southeastward, reach the Mississippi valley and tho western upper lake region Monday, the ohio valley Tuesday and New Kngland in the middle of the week, announced the weather bureau's weekly forecast tonight.  This is expected to force temperatures to the freezing point by tomorrow morning ox’er the Central Rocky mountain region and the Northwest. Tho first half of the week will be unsettled and the second half more normal in the East.  Generally fair weather after Monday is expected in the plains states.  Al mill ii I it Ii • firemen n ni'rit red to Im VO «le*if rwe11 % e Itlnr.e nuder ooh-frol. lint Inr«<* |»nrl of low* find keen reduced to n«hc* and la winced fire (Hill fattened fiercely* t)*nnmltc nhiilr hiocka find (ben fire Imrnu thrnnsH del*rid—Light min tinnily begin* to (nil.  Me., April Sh —One-third ot in ruins, thousands of per->meio*s and a property loss it fft.rtoo.Ooq av as sustained as conflagration which tonight Starting in a hay sh*il <>n Broad street, the fin# swept along Broad and Exchange streets through the heart of the city, leaving residences, churches, schools, business blocks and all tho public buildings, with the exception of tha city hall, a mass of smoking ashes For many hours the firemen, assisted by men and apparatus from other Maine cities, battled against the blaze before they conquered it. Dynamite proved of little avail. Buildings were blown up, but the dames easily leaped the chasms thus made and it was not until the wind, which had been blowing almost a gale during the night, shifted and a light rain fell that there was an Indication that the firemen would win.  X|trc««|* liver Tan vin,.*,  Cheered by th® help from this unexpected quarter, the fir** fighting forces were concentrated near the corner of Hammond and Centra! streets, nearly two miles from the start of thu blaze, i and there the spread of the dames was i checked at midnight.  But while the rain and the shifting  1  of th** wind to the east saved the rest of the city, it only added to Ute dis- !  comfort of thousands who had seen their homes go up In flames and who were huddled together in the streets. The burning of churches and public buildings left ninny of the unfor-tunates without shelter.  Three lives are known to have l*e> n lent, although the names of none of tho \ let uhs ar** known.  Three Alen Killed.  A fireman was Injured by a falling wall and died on tile way to th© hospital; an unidentified young man was crushed to death when on# of th© churches collapsed, and an elderly man from Brewer, who had crossed the river to watch the fire, also was buried beneath falling debris.  Neither of the city’s newspapers, th© News and the Commercial, was burned, and both will publish as usual tomorrow.  The problem of housing and feeding the destitute must be met at daylight and will be a serious one, for the usual places of refuge in such disasters ar** in ruins, and there is hardly an eating house, bakery or other store where food can he secured left standing.  Already offers of help have been re-* **lyod by Mayor Mullen, but the proffered aid cannot bo expected to arriv© In time to prevent suffering.  At midnight the firemen appeared to be getting the mastery of the situation, although the fire was still burning fiercely in many places. A light rain is falling.  AWAIT DARROW IN M’NAMARA CASES  pie  the midshipmen,  The midshipmen are unabl* stand why every one should be ready to brand them as “snobs." when a large I** r< entage of them ar** appointed from families having but littl realize that the United tfii-hlng them with an feel that they are properly appreciative.  to under-  wealth. They States is fur* ’(location and  WOMAN RISKS HEE SWE ANIMALS I ?  TD  COSTS HIM ODfiRTER ADVOCATES OF DEICE TO MIKE I NICKEL:  ST ^  Wilmington, Del., April 30. Despite the fact that sh*' was aioli", ii most blinded by smoke aiel suffering from a kick bv a horse, Mrs. Willis t H. Klair this afternoon saved five horses  i n 11 live  atli iii rn of  c »xx s from being burned ti a fire which deaf road ti hor brother, I J. Hofiings  Chicago, April 30.- The hardest working counterfeiter on record is now In eaptivjty, according to Thomas I. Porter, head of tho government secret service in Chicago.  He ' Andrew Barto, who wns captured in a raid on his “den,** Iii I North Paulina street, a week ago. Rarto’s partner, John Jose, escaped after a battle with tho government officers.  According to the testimony of Captain porter before tile federal grand Jury, it took half an hour to make •ach Of tim lead nickels Barto and his “pal" were counterfeiting. He estimated tho mechanical work on each coin to be worth 2" cents, and said they had planned to dispose of them at 2 cents each “in bulk" to confederates.  The grand Jurors were Liken to Captain IVirter's office, where they saw tic' outfit of th© counterfeit ■!' It (•(insists of a heavy stamping machina, bellows, forge, stamping press aud a number of other devices for polishing and “trimming'' the cuius.  .iti.i th" I  .lit."It OU  pear** I”*’ j ,,,is not far  11!   Nil tlon a1 a • i ( nevi ’on. Wit ii a ■)• :• Iov -  .I ai na ... that o  Baltimore, April 30. The third Pea. I congress will assemble I W die nay for a four days’ s. rf arbitration tr< atle* mom ut*! acting t! t Hone, advocates of I (• j 1117. a t: (>! 't tacit  Lint.    ,    ,    v,  on tic pre? "'ne' of speakers With President Taft are Cardinal Gibbons, Hamilton Holt >*t New York, Dr. b b. Bowe of the University Of pennsylvania, Andrew Carnegie, Benjamin F. I  1  u*’bl '"d of Boston, secretary of the Americau Peace society, and William C, pennb of Washington.  Tile re will lie three sessions daily, at which, among others, will bt* heard I’..non (VKstourneiies de Constant of France, Senator ll. L. A. Contain of Belgium. nlsltant secretary of state; Congressman James M. Slayden of Texas, Lu*. T. Ylen-ga, Japanese professor of Chicago univer shy; Talrott 'VVIlllatriH, editor of the Phil a dolphin Press; Dr. Lyman Abbott, editor  of Outlook; Mrs. Iz *I\;, Loeku I, the  Rev. (J. Elbert Read and Samuel Brooky president of Baylor University.  worth,  Mrs. mot bel from tin* barn she found tin  near Elsinore.  Clair was aion* u th when .via* sum 1  smoke Bunning to th ®l>er portion  a i  of the textile schedules.  \\'hi!*- this work is progressing it is probable that the house will act upon i tin report of the territories committees "ii statehood for Arizona and Mexico.  ria* New Mexican constitution has linen vigorously assailed by democrats from the territory, but it is doubtful if til© committee will recommend any i .age that would necessitate th** ref-e'-em • of th** constitution to tile peo-pl, of the state. Both constitutions probably will be recommended for ratification.  ♦  I F,/ M Alt STARA ATHIX.  Fez. April 23. -(Delayed)- The city is , but th© stock of provisions is iud famine threatens the populi^ **.  There have been no further attacks by the rebels, among whom dissensions appear to be springing up.  qui  low  iss img ■ stab!", a mass  of flames, with embers falling on the ' frightened livestock below. Although nearly blinded toy smoke, she organ to ■ liberate the cows and burses, and \>h e doing so on© of the latter kicked her, almost fracturing lier leg. Althorn*a sin* got out five horses and five cows, one horse, on. steer, two cows and tho calves were burned to death.  The fife, which caused a loss of $10,000, is believed to have been the work of an incendiary.  XU CHIMIN IX .IAF AX.  Tokio, April 30.—Count Katsura, th© premier, in an interview today authorized tho statement thai no change in the cabinet Is contemplated. Various rumors have been current here and widely published that the resignation of the Katsura cabinet was imminent.  I This caused an unsettled condition I and has proved annoying to tho gov. rn-I ment.  FA 1„LE I RES GETS ItAFK.  Paris, April 30,—President Follicles arrived here today from a fortnight’s visit to the French protectorate and regency of Tunis, Africa.  CURRIED A FORTUNE  Ogden, Utah. April 30 On the body of an unidentified man who was ground to death under the wheels of an Ogden Short Line passenger train here this afternoon was found a money b. It containing more than 11, oui.) rn gold and currency. There v is not a scrap of paper or anything ©l.-e by which the man mitrht be identified, and no relatives have claimed the body.  There are indications which point to suicide, although it is possible that the man attempted to board the trein. The man was standing on the project ing timbers at the side or a bridge \s the train passed lie was soon to throw himself under the fourth car. His body was horribly mangled. The money belt was discovered at th© morgue.  Los Angeles. April 30. —No word has j kYederlcks spent the day in the country yet been received here direct from  llIu ^ could not be found to discuss th© Clarence Durrovv, the Chicago attor-  the expected legal  ney, that he would undertake th** defense of Jolyi and James McNamara, and those interested in the case of th© accused dynamite conspirators snld today they were therefore at sea yarding possible acquiescence in early arraignment of the prisoners.  Labor leaders bere do not want tile men arraigned until narrow Is on Bio ground, and the best information they  bad I oda \ was  of coining Ii"!'" confidential th© situation,  ace. pt th© p<  In  MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF BUTTE WHO START IN WITH MAYOR L. J. DUNCAN  First ward—John J. Riley, democrat; Frank curran, socialist. See and ward—T. J. Ne rny, democrat; James Doner, demon at. Third ward Hugh McManus, socialist, for two years;  John •’. Smith, bot ii democrats, for one J’ear.  Fourth Ward John M. Barber, republican: Tom Fifth ward John T. Murphy, democrat; Andtcw  E. T. Mooney or  Hawke,  Hissed,  republican.  socialist.  I-Itta ward John I. Murphy, demo.i. <. •-****•*    ,    ,.„,    ,,hlicun  Sixth ward T. A. Grlgg, republican; Sam  l ^^ k . c ^Vv)x sn iiis! s,,-n.h ward XV. XV. Traoy. rrrublCan: Arthur f ox so I. ll-.  Eighth ward- j, r ph    H«nrjr^ | »  of how theVhh’d warVfight shall bo settled, as both Mooney and Smith are democrats.  ii  that Carrow, instead personally, had sent a representative to look over before b, ■ would agre© to ijjluii of chief counsel, consequence, the arraignment, scheduled to occur not later than Wed-!  s day, may be deferred, and tho district attorney is expected to consent to the del av, as it is understood that he is not averse to having further time to adjust various technical pointe  1  on the state's side of the case. These ! points are said to concern til,© indictments against the accused men. which were drawn hastily after Burns had taken James McNamara and Mc* Munigal into custody at Detroit.  It was als., reported in official quarters today that the arraignment might wait tho arrival of attorneys representing the National Erectors’ association, who. it is snld, will join District attorney Fredericks and his assistant, VV. J. Ford, in the prosecution of the McNamara*.  vie via n tun I IAI ranged.   1  Since his alleged confession to the prosecutor tlye© days ago and his suh-; sequent refusal to s« <* attorneys for th© I defence, McManlgal is left out of all consideration by the friends of th© McNamara brothers District Attorney  report concerning aid from the East.  The strike situation in the city added to the perplexities of the labor leaders.  Antonio Johansen of the Stat© Building Trades council, and Joseph Gray, president of th,e carpenters’ union, who re- I came down from San Francisco to an direct the batt!** of the local oorpen-tors for a higher wage and shorter hours, were in conference with the officials of the Los Angeles organization most of the day. Andrew Gallagher, secretary-treasurer of the San Francisco Labor council, had been her© three days ago, It was said, and was expected to return tonight or tomorrow to join in thy discussions of whether a general strik.- should t ailed to compel acceptance of union demands.  Ii©  til*!  Heittld Vr*lc||. ,,n I’ondvr,  In th.- county jail the McNamaras md McManlgal spent a quiet day. None received visitors.  All three rose early, and after cold bathjs In tho basement of th.* prison, displayed lively appetites at breakfast. They at** separately, under the eyes of Jailer Gallagher. Roast beef, vegetables, fruit and cake constitute th© fare.  All three prisoners declined with thanks tim invitation of th© missionary to attend services.  The cell of each man ta well lighted  and all three spent tty day with in ig i zincs.  James McNamara enter; bn J lilin-retf with a technical magazii reading an article on “What a I honsand Pounds of Dynamite Wilt Do " McManigal’s prefer©!© © aiemlagty lay in narratives of Adventure, sod the story he read this afternoon v* entitled* "Throwing Death * »ff the Trail."  I   

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