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Moberly Monitor Index Newspaper Archive: October 29, 1960 - Page 1

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Location: Moberly, Missouri

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   Moberly Monitor-Index (Newspaper) - October 29, 1960, Moberly, Missouri                              MOBERLY MONITOR-INDEX AND MOBERLY EVENING DEMOCRAT VOL. 42 MOBERLY MOXTTOB ESTABLISHED 1S89 MOBZSLT INDEX. 1ST. 1916 MQBERLY DEMOCRAT. E6T. 187) NO. 102 FULL W23X SERVICE FBXSS AKD WIDS WOSIX> SAT., OCT. 29, 1960 Need for Spiritual, Human Values Seen Dr. Fred McKinney, in Closing Address at "Religious Week, Says Americans Put Too Much Emphasis on Material Things 1 EARNS TRIBUTE Lee R. Sprangler, veteran general chairman for Religious Em- phasis Week services, was given special recognition last night at the close of the 1960 series at the Municipal Audi- torium. Tribute was paid by (failed to reach them; how the cur- the Rev. 0, Clarence Wick- strengthening of our external cultural goals and values is being Marines' Visit to Navy Base Sets Off New Cuban Charges _.! Americans have -surrounded with material d luxuries and gadgets but have 'jtended to lose sight of spiritual i and human values such as friendli- j ness, brotherhood and forgiveness. This was the theme of the talk, 'on -'Worthy Public given j 11by Dr. Fred McKinney, professor; of psychology at the University of Missouri, last night at the clos- ing session of Religious Emphasis j Week, whose total attendance was -a'the largest in the 15-year history of the program. The speaker said that Americans do not need to give up their labor- saving or luxury commodities, "but to expect them to give life true meaning, to define human POLITICAL UPS AND the too floor of this to crises, is a grave ai added: in Limestone, Me., was turned into a Democratic headquarters, local Republicans promptly opened headquar- _ religious community needs j ters on the ground floor. Republicans put up a "Stay on the ground floor, vote Republican" sign. Democrats answered to .continue to increase efforts to surround us with worthy public images reflecting deep human] values." Learned From Turks Dr. MeKiimey said a year he spent in Turkey, where he taught and visited, gave Mm a better per- spective of our own culture and with: "Be on the top, vote Democratic." (AP Wirephoto) strong president of the Mob- erly Ministerial Alliance. Mr. more basic spiritual and human Spanaler immediately launch- ed today on plans for the 1961 services. Rail Switchmen Reject Second values. "Having lived in Asia Dr. McKinney said, "where the Christian Church had an early start, seen the ruins of Grecian and Roman civilizations on the one hand and the persistence, even to- Offer of 17 Western Lines Turned Down in Secret Mail Ballot BUFFALO.. N. Y. (AP) The second wage offer by 17 western and southern railroads and switching companies has been re- jected by the Switchmen's Union of Nortlh America. Sixty per cent of the union members who voted in the secret mail referendum were against accepting the proposal, a union made, possibly at the expense of Nixon Feels Ike Puts Campaign Info High Gear Pleased by What He Calls 'Devastating Criticisms7 of Rival By JACK BELL WITH NIXON IN ILLINOIS! Religious Week Speaker Brought Here by Plane When Dr. Fred McKinney, Col- umbia, last night's speaker at the Religious Emphasis Week Pro- gram, missed a plane from Okla- homa City to Columbia, he took another flight to Kansas City. Arrangements were made for Willard and Graves Sandford, Mo- berly pilots, to fly to Kansas City to get the speaker. The professor arrived on stage shortly before he was scheduled to May Push New Invasion Alarm At U.N. Session Cuba at a Glance By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS j agency also distributes its ownj i of j version of Soviet Premier Khrush-1 U. S. Marines arriving at Guan-! chev's statement to Cuban news-1 tana mo naval base in eastern U. S .government says men saying promise of Commu- nist rocket aid to Cuba is "sym- they're only staying for weekend boiic." Some Americans in Mos- i of rest and recreation. Marines' j cow see this as slightly pulling Will Renew Appeo! tO j arrival expected to prompt new j rug from under Castro. Uk. I f I 1 lw Primp. .N.; Castro Says Of5n s Attack On Navy Base') CAIRO Egyptian corresppn- UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. dent is expected to sound new quotes Castro not as sayng jio attempt seizing Guantanamo by force and giving Washington pre- text to interfere in Cuban internal calls rest and recreation "laughable pretext" for sending Marines. Soviet news invasion alarms Monday when the General Assembly acts on the rec- ommendation to dump her charges against the United States into the lap of the Political Com- mittee. The Cuban delegation has warned it will put up a stiff bat-L L L D I tie to reverse the decision of the WODGSn DTD KG HIGH Steering Committee and insist that its Soviet-backed complaint be carried directly to the assem- bly floor. Will Grab at New Issue Diplomats predicted the Cubans UNITED NATIONS Guan-j tanamo Marine landing expected to be issue when Cuba presses aggression charges against United States on Monday. S. authori- ties plan to issue details week to support their charges that vast quantities of Soviet-bloc arms are being sent to Cuba United States also asks arms probe by Organization of American States. day, of Judean Christian values President Richard M., the other hand, raises some rolled his presidential eam-j questions about the great into Chicago's suburbs to- tance of Judaic Christian values for personal inner strength to weather crises." "This was he con- tinued, "by' living with and teach- ing Turkish Moslems, who gave clear first priority to their faith in ,71 make his address. day -with a glowing endorsement from President Eisenhower. j The Republican presidential] nominee made it dear he be- -lieves the send-off the President gave him in a nationally televised appearance in Philadelphia Fri- Car Accident God their practices of brotherhood j put in! Fnnpml fn RP and secondary significance gear at a particularly criu-j fO 06 clothes, cars, modem appliances and gadgets." Dr. McKinney found that God, country and family have great meaning to the people with whom he lived in Turkey, and that the people have great inner strength. He pointed out that during the Ko- rean War "not a single Turk de- fected." Possessions as Yardstick By placing so much importance on material things, what a man jhigh cal time. Herbert G. Klein, the vice pres-l idenfs press secretary, said Nix-! on was "exhilarated" by Eisen-j hower's praise of the Republican i A lllliUll -L. V t_ spokesman said Fridav. Fortv peri has become 1 IT JT __C" __t_ _ A measuring a man instead of what a man is, the professor said. "Have we 1 o s t in the last 60 years the great emphasis on inner he asked. "We are great problem. solvers, but sometimes we can't solve tie human problems. "There is no juvenile delinquen- cy in Turkey. cent favored its acceptance. Nell P. Speirs, president of the union, said the offer provided for 2 per cent wage increase retro- active to July 1, I960, and another 2 per cent hike March 1, 1961. Improvement in vacation and paid holiday benefits also was in- cluded, he said. Switchmen aver- age -an hour. 76 Per Cent Voted Seventy-six per cent of the imionTs members voted on the offer, Speirs said. A preliminary injunction, sought by the railroads, was issued here by federal Judge John 0. Hender- son Oct. 1? barring a strike by the union indefinitely. The negotiating committee and A" Democratic rally, primarily railroad officials had reached the for Monday for Veteran Highway Engineer Everett E. Baker, 64, 916 West Henry Cabot Lodge. Hail His Blast at Kennedy Bui more important politically, Klein said, was what the press for 22 years for the State Highway Department, died at o'clock this morning in the Medical Cen- ter of the University of Missouri, secretary described as Eisenhow-j Columbia. er's devasting criticisms of Nix-1 m- Baker complained of chest on's democratic rival, Sen. John F. Kennedy. and leg pains following an acci- dent Thursday on Fulton avenue Nixon's supporters also automobile struck a particularly pleased that the Pres-j car after he apparently ident had urged his listeners blacked out. He had not been to pay too much attention to parry j well for several years, but he labels. The vice president has would make an issue out of the U.S. announcement that Ma- rines would go ashore for "rest and recreation" at the big U.S. naval base at Guantanamo this weekend. The Marines are with an amphibious group training in the Caribbean. Cuba was expect- ed to denounce the move as a U.S. show of strength. In an appeal to the Steering; Committee Tuesday for urgent! assembly consideration of the ag- gression charge, Cuban Foreign! Minister Raul Roa claimed that the United States planned a "manufactured provocation" at Guantanamo to influence the U.S. presidential election. The United States denounced the Cuban charges as a "mon- strous fabrication." Despite Roa's emotion-packed demand, the 21-nation steering group voted 12-3 with 5 absten- tions to send the Cuban complaint first to the 99-nation Political Committee where the United States insisted it belonged. Injured as Freight Hits Parked Boxcars QUINCY ,ffl. Wabash Railroad freight train hit string of parked boxcars when it was accidentally shunted onto a side: track at the entrance to the Quin-j cy yards today. A brakeman was injured and the engine and three boxcars were derailed in the mis- hap. Mo., was taken to St. Mary's Hos- pital in Quincy. Spokesmen said other crewmen on the freight escaped injury by f jumping off the train when they realized it was going to hit the The Soviet Bulgaria, the Union, Romania, three Communist members of the committee, cast the only negative ballots. With its already loaded work (Continued on Page 4) boxcars. Witnesses said the string of'i .struck by the train j 1f_sfed were shoved about 500 feet the track. Trio to Jail To Await Trial For Burglary Kansas Citians Unable To Give Bond After Arrest in Pig 'n Bun Three young men from Kansas iCity, charged burglary and stealing in a break-in at the Pig n' Bun early yesterday, have been bound over to the December term of circuit court at Huntsville. At a preliminary hearing in i walked away from his car at the been time, seemingly all right. "Juvenile delinquency could beU (Continued on Page 4) the Quad Cny Azrport near sounding this note ia areas suchj He entered Woodland Hospital as the shopping center ccircuit on shortly afterward and was trans- which he was billed for .appear-jferred by his physician there to ances after a morning rally. at I tin Democratic Rally And Dance Monday For Negro Voters agreement in Washington. Oct. 1. "Frankly, we don't have much of a bargaining position as long as the injunction Speirs said. Appeal From Injunction An appeal from the is in effect." at Island, hospital, where he underwent emergency surgery. Mr. Baker had been with the Aides said Nixon hoped to. stir j Hjghway Department 35 years and up in the suburbs the kind of in Moberly 22 years He publican and independent support jwas a veteran of World War One. he needs to offset an _ expected j member of Post large Democratic majority Chicago. Claims 'Tide Runs His Way" Nixon, told a cheering partisan! (Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. audience of about persons iwho Josephine Baker; a son. Carl Baker, ParkvUIe; two brothers, pie Friday night he is convinced Baker' Mo.; a sister the Municipal Auditorium Monday Iowa Snic Tern- Dixon, and Glenn night at o'clock with the Iowa> icm speakers to be Leon Jordan, a Democratic committeemsn from Kansas City, and T. M. McNeaL St. Louis, a candidate for state the tide is running his way Blackwell, Carthage, the presidential contest. He de-jMo-' grandchildren. scribed bis whistie-stODping tour I Another son, Paul Baker, fighter across Illinois as "one of the in World War Two, lost Ms injunction1 senator. Introduction of dis- j exciting days of campaigning" in action over France in 1944. He was a member of the Odd has been filed by the union guests made_ byjhad seen- The body is in the Mahan Funer- Fellows Lodge and the Paris Bap-j M. B. Powers, 86, Lumber Dealer A U j AL a Dreummaxy Hearing m At r.QriS, UieS J Magistrate W. A. Stringer's court j yesterday afternoon, bond was setj The Browning Pow-j at each, which the stop veteran lumber dealer and.jfailed to make, so were put in jail identfal nominee's PftQf nf Paris rHpd of _- I VJjl Castro Expected To Blast U.S. on Television Today America Asks Inquiry Into Shipments of Soviet Bloc Arms By ROBERT BERREIXEZ HAVANA arrival of a contingent of TJ.S. Marines at Guantanamo naval base today for the weekend was expected to launch Prime Minister Fidel Cas- tro into a new round of charges that the United States is groom- ing an invasion force. Cuban officials showed great in- terest in the announcement from Washington that Marines on. maneuvers in the Caribbean wiH land at the UJS. naval base at the east end of Cuba for a few days of rest and recreation. Cuban officials did not ment. Castro was to make a na- tionwide television speech today, the time of which was indefinite. Other Developments The Washington announcement coincided with other developments in plummeting TJ.S.-Cuban rela- tions. The government controlled press in war-type banner lines said the 300 Marines already at ,Guan- tanamo were polishing up their training realistic combat ex- ercises. A Marine has been MEed and three have been injured by j mines planted along the perimeter charge right back to- Of tie base, these reports said. Cuban authorities at Santiago, near Guantanamo, were said.to be concerned that the United 'Dangerous' Talk Charge Tossed Back at Nixon Kennedy Quotes GOP Nominee's Attack in 1952 Campaign By JOHN CHADWICK PHILADELPHIA (AP) Sten. John F. Kennedy, accused by Vice President Richard M. Nixon of naive and dangerous talks about a relative decline in U.S. and mfilaiy He said that "no more unwar- ranted attack has ever been made on our prestige and military pos- ture" than Nixon made in Octo- ber, 1952, during that year's pres- idential campaign. He quoted Nixon as saying at that time that "This nation faas lost its military superiority and the people of the world are 5-1 against us instead of being 9-1 on our side as was the case when the war ended." "Unwilling to Trust People" Kennedy also said in remarks prepared for a rally at the Law- rence Park shopping center in tie Philadelphia suburbs that Nixon and the Republican party are un- willing to entrust the people with the real facts about where we stand with respect to prestige' abroad, defense and space andj the nation's economy. States was preparing a fake tack against the big naval1 instal- lation as a pretext for armed ag- gression against Cuba. U.S. Asks Investigation The U.S. State Department asked a special six-nation com- mittee of the Organization of American States to investigate its Soviet bloc arms have been shipped to Cuba along with munist technicians to train Cu- bans in their use. The committee was set up last August to look in- to U-S.-Cnban disputes. Sources in Havana said (Continued on Page 4) they fn IO shopping center was in >p in the Democratic res UUIIMUCI m life-long resident of Paris, died at Huntsville. through the outskirts of Philadel- last night in Woodland Hospital, The youths are Herman Isham phia after a tumultuous 18-hour j Moberly 344 F where he was admitted Thursday Folium, 22; Robert Walton, 21; and j day and night of campaigning Fri-j 4 M "will honor pasf masters afternoon. He had been in failing j Raymond Blanco, 18. Police said day in northeastern Pennsylvania J a bancuet at the Masonic health several years and became {Folium, and Walton apparently are seriously ill Thursday, i first offenders, but that Blanco Mr. Powers, the son of the late i has been in previous trouble. Far Into the Night Kennedy actually finished Fri- day's campaigning early today ers, was born in Monroe County and lived in Paris for more than 60 years. Upon graduation from the Uni- Temple, Monday night at o'- clock. _ There are 34 living past mas- ters, eight non-residents, the re- three inside the Pig n' Bun after! ner under a tent on a muddy, maining 28 living in Moberiy. Swaa Browning Pow-. Officers said they surprised a speech to a din- receiving a telephone call from an j drenched golf course. j McDonald, Kansas City, who was unidentified person that persons; Kennedy hit hard on unemploy-jmaster in 1910, is the oldest in jment, the problem of economical-1 point of service, and Gus Williams (Continued on Page 4> were in the drive-in. versity of Missouri, Columbia, be; Police said the trio had a box became full partner witb his fa- j with cigarettes and chewing gum ther in fee lumber business in Jin it when arrested. L., f Paris, and when bis father died, he Entrance to the Pig n' Bun was World W Or Airman became owner and operator. Later j gained by breaking the glass William C. Robinson joined him as j opening a back door. After Car Crash co-partner in the Powers-Robinson i Lumber Co. Spiers said "A long delay was ex- i Howard Tmrmons, Jefferson City. pected in disposing of the liti-j After the speaking and program, gation. Included in the dispute are j these railroad lines: Rock and the Minneapolis and St. Louis.' there will be dancing to music the Harlem Aces. He said that in the key states {al Home, where services will bejjjst Church. m, of Pennsylvania, Ohio, at U o'clock Monday morn-! Surviving are Ms wife, the for-1 cooler this afternoon, rain torn byjffimois and Iowa the "tide, is by his pastor, Dr. Blake West- mer Miss Katie Belle'Hawkins with total accumulations one (Continued on Page 4) moreiand. Burial wOl be in Dixon. U.S. Envoy Returns Home From Cuba WEST PALM BEACH, FlaJ Ambassador Philip Republicans End Negotiations For Debate, Blast Kennedy is the junior past master- Don Burton is the present master. E. F. Wilson, secretary of the lodge, said "is is hoped that we ihave a large group of members I and visiting members attend this I BROOKFIELD (AP) Gordon i banquet to honor these past mas- jAckley, 40, Kansas City, died have Siven mucn ,of I day of injuries suffered Monday time and service to the iwhen his station wagon struck a fraternity." Northwest abutment near Sumner -All Free Masons are cordially ght; Mo. invited to attend the banquet. ____________________________ _ ___ ___________ ._. Ackley, an Air Force gunner in I There vail be a short program and two daughters, Dr. Louise inches: Sunday cloudy, windy! World War n, was in a plane shot j Richard J Chamier, president Weather worth, Columbus, Ohio, and colder with intermittent show-j down after the bombing of PIoestLjof Margaret Powers, who' is tonight in lower 50s; high; ated with the Red Cross at Fitz-1 Sunday about of souri, will be the speaker. Simons Hospital, D e n v e r; one Missouri except Northwest-In- 1 J0 PJght Hunger and brother, Joe Powers Decatur; two! creasing cloudiness east central! The body is at the Sueed aiey Funeral H Funeral arrangemeuts are and; Blaiey Funeral Home, Paris. !niSht ap cloudy to-j scated Bonsai arrived from Cuba today. __ and indications were that he) WASKLNGTOjSi (AP) Repub- tative in die long-stalemated for the broadcast and would not return to the island "cans today broke off negotiations bate negotiations, to J. Leonard j asked for a meeting with network! republic., for a TV-radio debate be-jReinsch, Kennedy's negotiator. representatives today to complete i Bonsai, his wife and two resident Richard M.j Reinsch was not available Olid S Lip IS Cut taries came in aboard :the City of mediately for comment Although the negotiations had] T x-u- rx x Scribner's blast was aimed at alprogressed this far, Scribner said, inoon, spreading into central and! i eastern Missouri tonight and end-! The TJNICEF solicitation, spon-imost successful TJN1CEF drive inisterial alliance date- to New Orleans, a luxurious car fer- telegram to the Democrat- Nebraska Publisher Dies BRAINERD, Minn. (AP) Eu- gene Leggett, 57, publisher of the weekly Ord Quiz newspaper at Ordj Neb., and past president of the Nebraska Press Association, died Friday in a Brainerd hospi- ttl. v AVWlkUJ.AVWO -j iT1 1 1 ry which makes regular runs be-1C Potential candidate's repre- tween the Port of Palm Beach and Havana cused of issuing an ulti- matum and charging Nixon nego- tiators with bad faith. Demands Apology "There can be no further nego- tiations unless Sen. Kennedy apol- ogizes for the charge of bad-faith which has been made and with- draws Ms ill-advised ultimatum. telegram Kennedy sent Nixon Fri-1 Kennedy's negotiators wired the day calling on the vice president networks Friday charging bad to say by tonight whether he faith by Nixon's negotiators, would agree to the fifth, debate, j "In view of this fact Sen. Ken- "If an agreement is not wire, which "I consider coming by that Kennedy j without justification, could only said, American people will 'have been intended to make it ap- Mlli Marvin Sy, two-year old son of v t liouie know where to place the responsi- bility." Scribner's telegram today made! a point of saying negotiations had Jhe telegram was sent by Fred progressed to the point that he and C. Scribner Jr., Nixon's rtspresen-lReinschhad agreed on a time and pear that we had not talked with the networks and were not pro- ceeding with Scrifa- ner said. "In fact, the timing of the wire (Continued on Pagt t) ly, suffered a cut on the lip wher the car in which his mother was driving struck a parked, Wisdom Bros, pickup truck yesterday af- ternoon at 208 South Fourth. Police quoted Mrs. Sly as say- ing she hit the parked vehicle ing extreme southwest sored by the ministerial I not much change in directed this year by the First i Fights Hunger, Disease i except turning0 a little cooler Baptist Chur ch, will take place! The United Nations Children's i southwest Missouri Sunday; low; Monday evening in Moberly. Mrs. j Fund, established by the U.N. 'tonight in lower 40s southeast and Diehard J. Chamier, Mrs. Assembly, helps to allevi- v 
                            

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