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Laurel Morning Call Newspaper Archive: November 5, 1929 - Page 1

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Publication: Laurel Morning Call

Location: Laurel, Mississippi

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   Morning Call, The (Newspaper) - November 5, 1929, Laurel, Mississippi                                KUiCT. IRK WEHIC THE' MADDEN, I'HILOSO- HEK. LLER ACQUITTED. ARTHUR BRISBANE ,-right, 1920, by King Syri- dicatc) ens in twelve state's vote lo- om rMassachusetts tpxVali- froni Michigan to Virginia. iiiiu, the ,pnly state; electing agitated by a ;Srnitn; iti-SimtUt I i wjirf i .which a y's election will tell wheth- jinia's government, consist lemocratic for ,40 i years, is, lain "safely democratic or s dangerously -republican. c'ntucky, which in late years wed'.republican, republican will try to make a clean job y getting a majori.ty ,of the turc. York state, a negro, ,'T. Delany, is winning for ss on the. republican ticket, .strict normally democratic. buying orders" widely ad- d and expected did not ap- i Wall Street yesterday. But orders did appear, prices weak. The exchange will tl one o'clock all the rest of eek and all day Saturday ir. a wild 'night you -Have man push away: 'He doesn't feel like eating, gh it is a good breakfast I's the way with stock values, 1 wild two years. lough leading stocks went with sales above government bonds roso ic, turned suddenly wise, de- that the country is all right, ock gambling all wrong. asury department statistics, hcd yesterday, shows that ody-is prosperous. hundred and ninety Amcri- income over ach. Combined incomes of )0 amounted to vcn reported incomes above each. The income of tho L totalled X'. TheWeatHer Tuesday generally' fair frost, in north and central portion.'' Continued cooler with fair Wed- nesday. VOL. 193.- LAUREL, MISS., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1929. "ONE DAY AHEA'iMj BOOTLEGGER TO Sentence is Suspended by U. S. Judge Holmes CALLED TRIAL MERE POLITICS 1 this gives no idea of our i big incomes. Several meirl lerica have a year j one, at least, an income ex- ig Their prop- are in stocks that pay cor- ion income tax, invest their tigs in new properties and is- tock dividends paying no in- tax, in accordance with a :me "court decision'.'.'' c death pf John E. Madden from the study and breeding rses the ablest man in Ameri- nd a most intcnt'.ting citizen. brood mares produced six winncr.% a futurity winner, ,ty, and star shooter, sire of great brood marcs than any horse. iddon had studie'd horses and knew both, and said: "The ly is more important than tho idual. I should rather have lister marry a poor'.sample of >d family than the best kample poor family. The chance for lext generation would be bet- France, Corbctt shot nother to death. She had can- ie young man, British, told the ch jury: "I loved my mother, lied her because I loved her. ice could not deliver her from iy. 1 delivered her." ic judge said: "It was for God onsider when, your mother Id have died, not you. God it have prolonged your hiolh- life." ic son who admitted killing his icr shook his head and mur- ed; :y that the jury could hear "God is only a religious be- nd the jnry acquitted him. used to he-said "nature has a of void voyage." Tliat was ified later. uman nature certainly has a of irieonspicuousncss. Men s "to amount to nothing" and do almost anything to attract ntion. ne man jumped into a volcano he might die mysteriously. slavo burned .the temple of na at Kohcsus that his name ht be' rcmmbered. Proud Amcr- is'spend (jays and.'weeks on a pole, or dance without sleep rest for days'3t; a time, rling mice. Max Ilincl, a German Cobb- wcigbing only 121 pounds, ts the world's record by eating eggs in ten minuted Washington police arresting George L. '_C3sidy going up the steps of the senate office building, allege he was about to deliver a' pint of whiskey he was carrying. Officials arc seen with some of 2CC quarts police say they found in a raid on Cassidy's home. Cossidy leaped into prominence four years ago when he was arrested after leaving a brief case filled with liquor in the corridor of the house office building. Inset is of Cassidy. Boozing Solons Quiver in Boots Senator Brobkhart ..Hints He may Disclose Names of Senators Who Attended "Soaking Wet" Dinner Patronage Editorial of Jackson Man Was in Contempt. JACKSON, Nov. Sullcns, editor of the Jackson Daily News and for years a stormy po- Ircl in Mississippi politics, was to- day found guilty of contempt of court in connection with .an cdilor- ial published, by him" several mon- ths ago in regard to the federal patronage trial at Meridian where Perry Howard, negro, and others were on trial for alleged dishones- ty in postofficc appointments. Judge Edwin R. Holmes, federal judge before whom the case was tried, suspended sentence on Edi- tor Sullens, without naming any penalty. Sullcns' editorial was adjudged in contempt of federal court over hich Judge Allen Cox was presid- ing at Meridian, due to illness of Judge Holmes jjt the .time. Sul- lens denounced the patronage trial as a political maneuver, predicting that the defendants would be ac- quitted because of political rea- sons. Testimony in tho Sullcns was heard shortly afterward before. Judge Holmes, who delayed decis- ion on the case until today. -----------o----------- lone as Gloria Five Others Narrowlv Escape Injury Accident Workers Are Co'ached in Preparation for Drive Reporters Go to Jail, Legal Move Nov. -I. Three Washington Times report- ers, sentenced to 45 days for con- tempt of court when they refused to betray confidences accorded them during a recent liquor ex- pose, today voluntarily went buck to jail after four days of Imbeds corpus freedom. The return to prison was large- ly a legal move, adopted by coun- sel for tho reporters in order to clear the field of all issues except the appeal on (lie contempt charge itself. The three newspapermen, Gor- man llendricks, John Kevin and Linton Burkett, were sentenced when they refused to accede to the demand of the grand jury ami the United States District attorney to place themselves in the position of prosecuting witnesses against spcakcanios they had investi- gated. "I desire to give said Brookhart, "that I shall discuss tho enforcement of the-prohibition law in-general tnd Wall Street booze parties in particular when -I get recognition tomorrow." This' announcement was drawn by the statement of Senator Gil- lett, of Massachusetts, who, in an effort to minimize the action of Senator Bingham, of Connecticut, in taking a lobbyist into the secret sessions of the finance committee, declared he had seen members of the house transacting business on the floor while drunk. The Senate gasped at Gillctt's statement. But it shivered at Brookhart's announcement. Threats of exposing ..'senatorial drinking have been made before, but never carried but. But Brookhart is a boric dry and the senate is not suro of-what he may say. And there was considerable apprehension among some senators. "When I was in the other branch of congress, I" frequently saw 'mem- bers transacting business' under the influence of said Gil- lett to a startled senate and crowr- ed galleries. "But I did not think it was necessary to adopt a rseolu- tion of condemnation." "But that was not in in- terposed Senator Norris, of Ne- braska. .X 'It was no secret to those there, but it was a secret to the great American people, insisted Gillctf. Day Collections >T. LOUIS, '.Mo., .Nov. inc -Beclitold, 'owner of' a ariiory, today was'robbed 500 in cash and iri nc- .iablo four men who his car to-lhc curb-in the A'n-town district. Bcchtold said his loss was week I receipts of the company which was taking to .the bank. Ho. tcribed the four bandits as "all out 25." The senate already is disturbed over tho reports of senatorial tip- pling which have been revived by the capture of George Cassidy, known as "the man in the greet; hat" as he was about to Vntcr tho senate office building with a pint of liquor last week. Later Cassi- dy's home was rallied and over 200 bottles of fancy liquor seized. When Brookhart told the senate several weeks ago of attending tho dinner given by a "Mr. a Wall Street broker, to meet newly elected senators, he Smoot, of Utah, if he did not rc- mc'mbcr the dinner'and the flasks under the tables. Smool.cputd not recall the incident. Since that time, Brookhart lias identified Mr. Fahey, as Walter J. Fahey, a New York broker, and fornicV Washington newspaper cor- respondent, who is well-known in political circles here. Leo A. U. S. district at- torney, has subpoenaed Brookhart to appear before the grand jury Wednesday morning. The senator has promised to give the full story to the grand jury, hut may tell it in the senate also. Part of Chinese Army Rebels and Joins Enemy Presented and Defen- dant Says He Is Not Guilty Each. 10 miles of the new main highways under consideration for England will require 30.000 ton? of quarried stone, tons of cement, and 600 tons of steel. OUTSTANDING 4 JH LEADER THANKS HOME NEWSPAPER i FOR TRIP TO CONGRESS Suiiimcrland, Miss.' V: NOV. Editor The Morning Call: 'j-'I opportunity my-appreciation for the' trip given by The Morning Call to the national 4-H congress to be held at Chicago, which was award- ed me at the South Mississippi Fair. As our community, Ccntcrvillc, is awarded this great honor of hav- ing a representative, we nte the spirit of our daily paper in reaching out and viewing the needs'of our rural communities and being willing and anxious to aid in a financial-way as well as furnishing.-valuable reading nm terial to us daily. I', 'sincerely promise you that I will avail; myself of every oppor- tunityof gaining information val- uable to myself and community. and gladly pass it on to others that my co.unty may be benofittcd by my. going and that your splendid efforts 'may hot be in vain.. -to thank 'Mr. county agent, and Mr.' E. P. Ford, secretary 'and manager of the South Mississippi Fair, for their splendid 'co-opera- tion and council me, making club work a, success in our com niunity. Yours truly, BUKA HARPER LONDON, Nov. na- tionalist troops suffered reverses at the hands of Russian and rebel forces today, according to dispatch- es to this city from Shanghai and Hankow. In Manchuria Soviet troops were reported to have captured Fuchin after completely smashing the Chi- nese line. The Russian, advance, tho Shanghai Advice declares, was supported by airplanes and gun- boats operating on the Sungari river. The Chinese line of de- fense has been forced back sixty miles. From Hankow came .Ihe alarm- ing news lhat Marshal Feng Yu- Hsiang's Koumjnihun army has in- flicted a decisive defeat on Presi- dent Chiang Kai-Shek's national- ist troops near Lachokow, IIupcli province. Further advices added that the reorganized nationalisl fifth divi- sion had revolted and gone over in a body to Ihc Kuominchun forces. The mutinous nationalist troops arc reported ravaging the country- side. From natiojjalist headquarters at Siangyang came the report that the situation, despite tho reverses is not critical. Reinforcements are being hurried northward from Hankow. Oil Supply Cut Very Effective .LOS ANGELES, Nov. fornia's daily production of crude oil during tho first four days of voluntary curtailment has dropped more-than barrels a day. Present daily production was es- timated at barrels as com- Nov. I. Signal Hill's daily flow had been reduced below 120J500 barrels, or more than' "barrels daily. Santa Fc Springs production was estimated today at barrels, a reduction of better than barrels as compared to production on Oct. 31, WASHINGTON, Nov. ing formal jiidgment'iipon-oiio of Awn members, the United States seriate today wrote the sinister word "condemned" against the ac- tion of Senator Hiram Bingham, of .Connecticut, in .placing a lobbyist on tho senate payroll. The vote was 22 in favor of tho Norris censure .resolution. A solid phalanx of democrats anil progressive republicans went on record in favor of upholding Hit- honor And dignity- of the nation's grcatclt legislative body. Opposing tho rcsoluion were 22 old guard republicans who admit- ted Bingham's "folly" but .vainly pleaded that the terms of the con- sure resolution were too severe. Not a single voice except his own was raised in defense Ding- ham's conduct in sneaking lobbyist Charles L. Kynnson into senate fi- nance committee tariff sessions while he was receiving ycar an dexponsos as assistant to j the president of the manufactm- er's associalion of Connecticut. Several of the republican stal- warts tried to induoo. the senate to soften its censure. Twice before tho final ballot, the senate rejected modified versions of a censure resolution. It was the third time in history and the first since l'J02 that the senate had been called upon to con- demn one of its own members. It a momentous occasion. The Bcnatc and its packed galleries had listened to more than four hours of spirited and profound de- bate. Shortly after 2 o'clock Ihe final vole was reached and Ihe condem- natory censure resolution was adopted. Bingham, the lull, gray-haired, ex-Yale professor, sat immovably in his seal for a moment. Ho then dramatically arose, stalked down Ihc center aisle of tho crowded chamber and walked oul lo meet newspapermen lo tell them that he docs not intend lo re- sign his senalc nor vield his place on the finance commitlee. Early in Ihc. day's session, Bing- ham roso from his seat in the chamber and in a speech, bristling with defiance, had pleaded "not guilty" to tho charge In the reso- lution lhat he -tad by his action violated, senatorial elhics and.gpod morals 'and brought! into dishonor and The. text of ;thc rcsolulion, ns adopted follows: V'. .fj the'action of the senator from Conneclicut, Mr. Bingham, in'placing ,Mr. Charles upon Ihe official rolls of Ihc senalc and his use by Sen- alor Bingham nt Ihe lime and in Ihc manner sot forlh in Ihc rcporl of Ihc subcommillce of Ihc commil- lec on judiciary (reporl numbered 43, scvcnly-first congress, first while not the result of corrupt motives on the part of the senator from Conneclicut, is con- trary to good njirals and senatori- al ethics and tends to bring the senate inlo dishonor and disrepute, and such conduct is hereby con- "HOLD FRIENDS- MAKE NEW ONES" Enthusiasm Marks In- auguration of Civic Appeal for Funds By MRS. R. L. PATRICK The yearly camnnign for the budget of the Y. W. C. A. be solicited from the of Lau- rel during four days of this week bad an auspicious beginning last evening, when the general com- mittees and workers met for sup- per at the association. In college mid school circles the affair would be known as a "pep and no gathering of stu- dents could possibly manifest more enthusiasm than this group of eighty four women and girls who had met at tho Y for supper and with a common to mine the budget of III, (100 in the time pre- scribed. A delectable two course sup- per was faultlessly prepared by the Woman's Missionary Society of the First Baptist Church, and faultlessly nerved by llu% Girl's Auxiliary of -the. same church. Mrs. James 1.1. Lytli; was general chairman and Mrs. George Bun- tyn co-clmlnnair of the supper committee and'thcy were ably sup- ported by Mrs. Will Lindsey, Mrs. Jim Bnntyn, Mrs. Robert Martin and Mrs. .P. M. McDonald. The tables were set and prettily de- corated in bright autumn flowers by Mrs. John and her co- workers. Grace was said by Mrs. A. W. Hrunson, and after tho supper, Mrs. Murdoch Moline, president of the Y. W. C. A. board, extend- ed a few words of welcome, re- ferring to the "Do's and Don't: for and quoting from the card compiled by A. F. MsCormick, nhc said "Believe that tin; c.iusc is big enough, leadership ablo enough, working force large enough, faith great enough, pub licty wide enough" and with the slogan "Back the Blue This is a photo, when she was a society debutante', of Miss Gloria Kouzcr, held in Louisiana under tho name of lone Ord as a ma- terial witness in the murder of Jack Kraft. "My mother never will see me alive In this Miss Kouzvr exclaimed when told her real name had been learned and that her mother was coming from New York to aid her. TERI N CELL "lone Ord" and Parent Have Reconcil- iation STEERING SAID TO Bus. Carrying Eleven Crashes' Banistciv1'; POINT-A-l.A-IIACIIK, La., Nov. dashing Gloria Houxcr, who masqueraded under the alia? of lone Ord to accompany the ad- venturous Now York newspaper- man, Jack Kraft, on a_lrip to seek fame and fortune, reconciled with her mother here today in her pin- quomiiK'S prison cell. "Ah, my dear, I am glad to seo you said Mrs. Hour.er in her adoptod Fronch. Although the drive would bo put across. Mrs. McK.'ii; called on the gen- had protested her mother's oral of tho campaign, Mrs. A. F. i aid in her plight, she seemed equal- MeCoimick, who made a great I pleased t'j see her. spooch fully demonstrated the rca- Mm. Ronzer, accompanied by for her selection an leader of attorney, Miss Dorothy Frookn, this campaign. She is a thinker believes' in tho Y. W. C. A. ar. the moans of reaching the needs of girls and women and the associa- ......._ lion building as a civic center, iimljtj1L. Creole October 11 as the ship mi actual benefit to the enlin: I Mteamed up the Mississippi river city. Then loo Mrs. MtCormick its berth in New Orleans. j arrived here this morning to seek the release of the girl who is bc- log hold an n material witness in the mysterious death of Kraft on liplomal. To bur co-workers, she offered a few suggestions among which wero thcftc "Believe in organization unit make oth- (Continued on Pago Eight) Pollard '-arid; Brown Ark. Candidates in Nov. ginia's greatest political bailie ainco the days of reconslruction will be ended at the polls Tuesday, when it will be decided whether John Garland Pollard, old-line de- mocrat, or William Moselcy Brown, anti-Smith coalition candidate who was nominated by both Bishop Cannon's followers and republicans shall be governor of this stale. Bishop Cannon, lender of Ihc anli-Smilh forces in the south last year, has gone to South America and has not taken part in cam- paign, but the Rev. J. Sidney Peters, former prohibition com- missioner of Virginia, who was in charge of Cannon's headquarters and who worked in lichalf of tho election of Hoover to the presi- dency, Is confident Brown will win, Kraft was reported to have fall- on overboard but his bullet shat- tered body was found later on tho banks of the river. John McGoul- drick IIMM boen indicted on a first degree murder charge in connec- tion with the death of Kraft. Seven, persons were injuied, one of .Ihoni.iprobnbly fatally, and five more, had_< n miraculous escape from ilcaUj oritserious injury Monday, opn.' about 4: SO when an Old. South Coach bus crashed through' a bridge railing near Pachuta arid fell fifteen ifeel into the creek bed. Mrs. A. Fowler, 20, of Birm- ingham, sustained serious injuries and at a late hour lav.t night it was feared that she woulil die before morning. Others injured were: K. A. Homey, 40. or Orlando, Fla., bricklayer. Leo .'14, of Birmingham, Ala., merchant. Walter Hughes, 54, Montgom- ery, Ala., farmer. Otto Schludecker, .'IS, St. Peters- burg, Kla., pipe fitter. M. li. Jackson, 28, An'dalusia, Ala., saw mill worker. Mrs. Pennlngtin, of Jasper, wife of an attorney. The Old South passenger bus wan southward bound when it ap-, preached a bridge over a Hniail creek within a few hundred yards of the business section of Pncliuta. Passongons on the bus staled after tho accident that they felt the. vehicle shake as it went onto the bridge and a few seconds later- it plunged through the railing, foil- ing fifteen feet. Driver Gautbreaux is reported to have said after the accident that his steering gear had .suddenly gone wrong as he drove his car onto the bridge. He was badly bruised. The bus wax almost plctcly wrecked by the plunge. t C. II. Thompson was tho. to arrive on the scene, returning in a hearse from Meridian whore he had directed the funeral of -Mrs.- Mary Whitaker, this city, as rt.rcp'- rcscnlativc of Kitchen and Thompr son. Mr. Thompson stated (hat'tlto big bus hod just passed him ,anil thnt he was driving at. a very slow rate- of speed and the bus. was traveling only a littie fasteiw Mr. Thompson helped take '-the. injured from the bus, put sevoVal of them In hm own automobile ajul rushed them immediately to trio Laurol General hospital. eleven the driver. Olio of those1 was P. S. Gray of Binn- inglinm: Two others were negroes returning to their home ,in Ellis- jilrsc. '.Fowler, worst injureuVof .Kennedy Back LOS ANGKI.KS. Nov. works changes, and again the mother of Aimec Semplc McPhor- son is welcome within Ihe portals of Angclus Temple. The mother, Mrs..Minnie Ken ncdy, and the evangelist rirc'to meet in Portland, Ore.; some' time this week and probably will re turn lo this city'.logclhcr.' When the mother was as she lermed it, from the organ- b.alion last year she made charges concerning the famous and un- canny disappearance of her daughter thai resulted in the trial before the slate legislature of Superior Judge Carlos S. Hardy. The legislators, however, field that the jurist had done no wrong by accepting a "love offer ing" from Mrs. McPhcrson. CARDINAL HAVES HAS AUDIENCE WITH POPE ROME, Nov. Cardi- nal Ifayes, Roman Catholic pri- mate of New York, was profound- ly pleased tonight over thc'outcomo of bis private audience with Pope Pius XI at the Vatican. Tho Poniff received Cardinal Hayes this morn- ing. .._i. on Page Tammany Big Victory Walker I5 NEW YORK, Nov. final blast of oratory which cchoert throughout the five boronghsj tho municipal political campaign was' brought to a close tonight. VA'K' Tammany, after the last v'qrlj'iilv shots had boen fired, clung fastly to its. claim thot Mawf James .1. Walker will re-elected by a plurality of .from' ''A 500.000 to -n Norman Thomas, socialist candl- date, was looking forward fully to tUe heavy vote he pcctcd to receive. Thomas -was the only candidate who did pof claim victory. His sole to sco his party make an imprest, sivo showing. ,r 7 Political leaders of both expressed tho belief that will bo the heaviest ever mayoralty election in this' city! They believe it will be l size only to the vote east herein last year's prcs'dcnt contest, 'r'. V: t INEWSPA'PER; lEWSPAPERl   

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