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Laurel Leader Call Newspaper Archive: July 27, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Laurel Leader Call

Location: Laurel, Mississippi

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   Laurel Leader-Call (Newspaper) - July 27, 1962, Laurel, Mississippi                                lWAY'S THOUGHT Grow miry ftlowlf * fthere'i t *      * A   Serving Southeastern Mississippi 81st Year No. 179 Laurel, Miss., Friday, July 27, 1962 Seven Cents Daily Since 1911 Sprit* taste Its Tingling Tartness! HIGH TODAY 92* Weather Details under Briefi. Ask Whisky Sales Stop In Vicksburg SURPRISE. SURPRISE Valerie Matthews, six, of Louisville, Ky., enjoys the antics of 13 baby horned toads scrambling over the back of their mother, Mrs. Aloysius. The Matthews children brought the horned toad home from a recent visit to Flagstaff, Ariz, and had been in doubt as to the reptile's sex. The litter settled any doubts and she will remain "Mrs. Aloysius'*.        (AP Wirephoto) SINCE BLASTS ARE EASIER TO DETECT WASHINGTON (AP)-President Kennedy calls in his top advisers on atomic weapons policy today to consider trimming down U.S. proposals for policing a nuclear test ban treaty with the Soviet Union. Scheduled to attend the mid-morning White House meeting were Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, William C. Foster, chief of the disarmament agpncy, and Glenn T. Seaborg, chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. In preparation for today's ses- sion with Kennedy, the policy advisers agreed Thursday that new scientific developments now justify a reduction in the amount of international inspection necessary inside the Soviet Union to safeguard a test ban. It was ajso reported that the President's advisers agreed that inspection arrangements at this stage should include both the guaranteed right of on-site inspections in various parts of the Soviet Union where secret atomic tests might be held and internationally manned control posts on Soviet territory. The   administration's   obvious hope-however slender It may be -is that the new U.S. safeguard proposals, to be made shortly at the disarmament conference at Geneva, will interest the Soviet government in entering into serious negotiations once again for a ban on the testing of nuclear weapons. But, since such a development is regarded as highly unlikely 3t the present stage of the arms race; the alternative aim is to demonstrate this country's interest in obtaining a test ban, even at the cost of what would appear to be new concessions to Soviet opposition to inspection. Take-Home Box Feature For Lions Club Barbecue JACKSON, Miss, fAP)-Prohibi-tion - minded restaurateurs waved an ultimatum � in the faces of Vicksburg  and  Warren   County officials today, demanding an end to illegal liquor sales. Telegrams to Mavor John Holland of Vicksburg, Dist Atty. T. J. Lawrence and Warren County Sheriff J. H. Henderson allowed five days for liquor to cease flowing. J. P. 'Crechale of Jackson said there would be a check this weekend. "This check had better show liquor is gone," Crechale said, "or Gov. Ross Barnett will be called upon to order National Guard raids." Crechale said Barnett "has promised to send the Guard in if local officials refuse to end the sale of liquor at our Vequest. They've got to have it clear by Wednesday-either by choice or force." The six restaurant owners said the telegrams were a warning to the rest of the state. "We've got our beginning in Jackson and Hinds County. Now we're going to dry up this hypocritical situation," Crechale said. The committee said the city of Vicksburg receives a payoff of $125-a-month from each wholesale and retail establishment. Crechale said someone would sign an affidavit before Barnett if liquor did not stop. However, sources indicated Barnctt's promise of National Guard did not extend to another county, unless those complaining were citizens. Restaurateur Jimmy Angelo claimed, however, "Barnett told us he would send the Guard all the way to the Coast if we tried to stop the liquor and got no help from officials there." CHICAGO (AP)-A strike has been threatened by the 200,000 union men who man the nation's trains in an attempt to keep railroads from revamping work rules which would eliminate thousands of jobs. In a suit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court, the unions stated their intent to strike unless the railroads drop plans to enforce the work changes Aug. 17. The suit, filed by unions of engineers, trainmen, conductors, brakemen, firemen and switchmen, requests the court to declare he carriers' proposed changes a violation of the Railway Labor Act. The suit also applied for a permanent injunction to keep the managements from adopting new rules, recommended in February by a presidential commission. The suit stated, the unions "will be forced to resist said revisions by asking those they represent to withdraw from service" until they have forced the carriers to drop the proposed changes. The work rules changes, the railroads contend, are aimed at eliminating what they call "feath-erbedding"-keeping on the payrolls personnel whose jobs are unnecessary. The unions say the jobs are needed for safe and efficient operation. Management   estimated   that "featherbedding" cost the carriers $500 million a year. One of the first effects of the changes-announced July 17 by the railroads-would be dropping of the jobs of 13,000 firemen employed on diescl locomotives. Some 27,000 other firemen working as second men in cabs and freight yard service would retain their positions. The proposed job cuts also do not affect firemen occupying second cab posts in diesels used in passenger service. In taking the preventive action the unions were compelled to oppose favorable terms of the work changes. These included recommended pay increases for some 75 per cent of the operating employes. Unions joined in the legal action are the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Engine-men, Order of Railway Conductors and Brakemen, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and Switchmen's Union of North America. They named as defendants the Eastern, Western and Southeast* em Carriers* Conference Committee and the railroads represented by them. The suit also named several individual railroads as representative of the group concerned. There was no comment from representatives of management on the suit'or on the strike threat. POSTER BOY AGAIN IN 1963 BRIEFS r Something new has been add- td to the Laurel Lions annual barbecue-baseball   program,   which Will be staged Saturday. This worthy program, staged to raise support money for the Laurel Lions Colt Baseball League has been annually held only at South Mississippi Fairgrounds at auppertime. It will still be there Saturday at the same hours - from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. But shortly before noon Saturday, take-home boxes of barbecued chicken and all the trimmings, plus a cold drink, will go on sale at a Lions Club booth in the Gardiner Center, This means downtowners can have delicious barbecued chicken for their noon lunch Saturday. The Gardiner Center booth will be in business throughout the day. Again at suppertime at the Fairgrounds the Lions will serve platters of the barbecued chicken. And at 7 o'clock at Fairgrounds Park, the Laurel Dixie Boys All-Stars tangle with  Picayune  in the first game of a three-game series for the Mississippi Dixie Boys Baseball Championship. Tickets to the game are 75 cents for adults and a quarter for children. The series will be concluded at Picayune Tuesday night. The barbecue tickets are $1.25 ach. In purchasing a box lunch at the Gardiner Center booth or a platter at the Fairgrounds, the purchaser helps support Laurel Lions Colt League Baseball, a most worthy project for the youth of this community. Attendance at the Colt games this season has been off and support money is sorely needed. Multiple hundreds of fat broil- Partly cloudy through Saturday with widely scattered thunder-showers near the coast. No important  temperature  changes. Lowest tonight 66 to 74. Highest Saturday 88 to 94, Temperatures for the 24-hour period ending at 7 a.m., high 94, low 70, at 7 a.m. 74. Winds today at 11 a.m., calm. LAUREL SKIES GE To Pay U.S. $7.74 Million Terry Tullos of Laurel, as he looks today and as he appeared in 1948, as the National Foundation's National Poster Child, are pictured above. This will be an official photograph to be used in a national publicity campaign to celebrate the National's Foundation's 25th anniversary in 1963. �i � Terry, who also served as a Poster Child in 1950 along with four other children, is the son of Mr. and Mi's. C. E.' Tullos, 3003 Crescent Hill Drive. He graduated from Geroge S. Gardiner High School in the spring and this fall will attend Mississippi College in Clinton. Saturday, July 28 , ... 6:56 p.m. a.m. a.m. .July 31 ers will go on the barbecue pits at Fairgrounds shortly after dawn Sunset today Saturday. Members of the Lions Sunrise tomorrow  . ...5:10 Club will be the barbecue chefs. Moonrise tomorrow... .3:24 In the event of  rain,  you'll New Moon still be able to enjoy the bar- PROMINENT STAR becued chicken. There's a big Spica, sets...........10:06 p.m. shelter at Fairgrounds. And the VISIBLE PLANETS Gardiner Center booth can also be Venus, between Spica and the Sun. sheltered. Millionth Visitor WASHINGTON (AP)-A startled school principal who at first thought "they weren't going to let me in" is the one millionth visitor to the White House in 1962. William Nealv of Chester, Pa., was stopped at the visitors gate and military supplies are not to he increased, and that troops of the three factions will not attack each other. Louise Hits Japan TOKYO  -General Electric Co. hap agreed to pay a record $7.47 million to settle damage suits that followed conviction of the company in a price-fixing case, the Justice Department announced today. .Atty. Gen, Robert F. Kennedy said the settlement includes payment of $6.47 million to the Tennessee Valley Authority in damages for inflated prices paid to GE as a result of the price-fixing conspiracy. Another million will go to the government, for purchases from[ war� General Electric by other government agencies, Kennedy said. officials Berber Tribesmen Defy Bella's Rule Justice Department said the previous record settlement in a case of this type was $44,000 from the Ward Baking Co. last May. General Electric was one of 19 defendants in II civil damage suits filed by the government since March 1961. Attempts are under way to negotiate settlements with other defendants, Kennedy said. ALGIERS fAP) - Belkaccm Krim returned to Algiers today from his Berber stronghold in the Kabylie Mountains and announced he is forming a committee to defend the revolution against the power play of Ahmed Ben Bella. Both are deputy premiers in the paralyzed provisional government of moderate Premier Ben Youssef Ben Khedda, with Ben Bella in militant opposition to that regime and Krim in vigorous support. "We arc not thinking of civil Krim told newsmen as troops nominally loyal to Ben Khcdda labored to perfect defenses on the outskirts of the capital. "We are thinking of defense and | unity." Followers of Ben Bella, a radi- .After 48 hours of work among his Berber followers, Krim pulled up in front of the Aletti Hotel here in a black limousine. He was escorted by two bodyguards in camouflage uniforms. Krim said he intended to discuss with Ben Khedda the formation of the defense committee. Though he offered no elaboration of the plan, the fact he would consult the premier indicated he was not planning to set up another rival regime in Algeria, already divided by tribal and personality clashes. In any case, Krim told newsmen. Zone 3 will not let anybody penetrate its territory. Zone 3 covers a vast mountain region east of Algiers. It is Krim native area and is solidly opposed Estimate $24,000 Cost For New Sewage Disposal Estimated cost of lagoons for,ties sewage disposal at seven attendance centers in Jones County School District and to replace toilet facilities at the seven were announced Friday by J. Clifford Watson, county superintendent, as approximately $24,000. The cost estimate was made Thursday night in a report from John Joorfetz, engineer, to the Jones County Board of Education. of the remaining 16 att�n*. dance centers in the county is being made now, Watson said. E� sential equipment for lunchrooms in all schools are being tabulated, he added. Joorfefz's report was based on a survey he and Watson had made at the schools where sewage disposal systems are urgent to meet State Department of Health requirements, Watson said. He stated the district administration hopes the remainder of the schools will be given temporary approval with lesser improvements. Cost estimates of lagoons, if land for such is available, ran from $1,776.40 to $2,090.20 at Calhoun, Glade, Moselle, Myrick, Sandersville, Shady Grove and Soso, the attendance centers surveyed. If land is not available, cost of In the meantime, maintenance crews of the school district, are at work making repairs on lunchroom buildings, Watson stated. At Sandersville, most of the improvements on the building an completed. At Moselle, the crews are now putting in a new floor, plastering walls and installing ceiling. Improvements to the building at Calhoun have been completed. None of the stated improvements include equipment, which will be determined by the present survey, he added. Youth Is Killed In Fiery Crash COVINGTON, La. (AP) - A fiery car-truck collision near here Thursday killed John F. Spann Banana Company Ordered To Pay Up ATLANTA (AP) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture said today the Jackson Banana Co. Inc., cal already claiming control of!to Ben Bella and his followers, western Algeria and some points' in the east, were reported preparing to try to take over Algiers and impose their authority on the newly independent nation. Former Deputy Premier Mohammed Khkier is due in Algiers today from Ben Bella's headquarters in Oran, the chief city of western Algeria, as the vanguard of the National Liberation Front's seven-man Political Bureau. This is a Ben Bella-dominated group which plans to take control of the government. Khider said the other members will head in later.   acquiring acreage would be'anjJ'\ 18' of Rosewood, Fla., and additional   expenditure,   Watson!seriously injured his mother and said. Polaris Blasted CAPE CANAVERAL, Fin. (AP) -A Polaris missile testing advanced components wandered off course during second stage flight and was destroyed by the range safety officer Thursday. brother. Spann was in the car with his mother, Mrs. John Spann Sr., 32, Joorfetz's report stated any other method of sewage disposal on land alreadv available, would be! who was hospitalized in critical three to four limes as expensive.!condition, and his brother, Stan Toilet facilities, assuming that'>y Spann, 13, who received head ail present facilities at the seven j injuries, schools do not meet specifications' Both vehicles burst into flames and will have in be replaced, were, after the crash. The truck driver, estimated in excess of $8,000. jJohn Payne, Negro, of Covington The survey of the toilet facili-'was critically injured. Thursday, the conference was of Jackson, Miss., did not pay Wisconsin U President Dies told by an official of the U.S. Department of Labor that guidance and counselling leaders face a great challenge in assisting both the young and old to achieve a satisfactory vocational adjustment. Brunswick Bagdon, southern re-gional director of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, discussed the occupational outlook. House Approves Big Defense Bill three awards issued under the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act. The USDA said the company's PACA license terminated hefore the orders became final and that the company is not entitled to engage in business until the awards are paid. Jackson Banana Co., said the USDA owes $556 to Robert Neu-man and Sons and Shatter, Calif., for potatoes; $421 to Michael A. Conn, Inc., Kingshurg, Calif., for 'fruit; and $349 to Ike Griffin, i Holder and Thomas, Rocky Ford, MADISON, Wis. (AP) - Dr. Conrad Elvehjem, fi2, president of the University of Wisconsin, died at Madison General Hospital today shortly after goffering  heart attack. Shelter Request Nixed Colo., for onions. WASHINGTON (AP)-The larg-' est peacetime defense money bill in history has passed the House1 TfinnV'^ HUMOR and gone to the Senate. i   1 UU*l I O J1U1UUII Passage there may be delayed by consideration of the administration's communications satellite!^' city�on7da"y"asked his teach;|;;X^ Robbers Loot Jackson Firm JACKSON, Miss, (AP) - Police continued a search today for two armed robbers who took about $900 from a loan company. Mrs. Mary Edwards, an employe of the firm, said one of the men walked up behind her Thursday, put a pistol to the hack of |her head and "told me he wanted � money and for me not to push a ibutton or anvhting or he would ishoot me." ,   The men tied Mrs. Edwards' hands behind her back and placed a strip of tape on her mouth. Another   employe,   James   E. PARTNER TELLS WEIRD TALE Claims In Paup C of fin bill. .Keenum. said they took his bill-A 3rd-grade student in a South^oId which contained about $40 in s  checks.   He  also  was WASHINGTON (AP) A presidential request for $568,755,000 to start an extensive fallout shelter construction program drew a "no" today from the House Appropriations Couiluittee The measure provides $48,236.-!' 247,000 to pay, arm and operate'1*11' tiie nation's military forces this fiscal year. House passage Thursday was by voice vols. how  do  you  spell;bound and gag�ed. AMARU IX). Tex. (AP)-Specu-Dist. Atty. Frank Baughmantributed at drastically cut prices lation thai Billie Sol Estes hid a asked. in an effort to corner the West fortune in a pauper's grave was'   "It is just my personal assump- Texas market, given in testimony at a court of; tion." Orr said, "but 1 think it was   4. More than one threat has been inquiry Thursday. so he could store all that loot in made on Orr's life since he gave One of three men indicted with'sume poor old boy's grave." Estes on fraud and theft charges1   Orr also testified: involving millions of dollars vol-;   I. Worthless notes and sales con-uuteered the huried treasure sug- tract through which Superior Man-gestion at a hearing which a Newiutncturing   obtained   the   money York chemical firm, facing a civil'funneled  $ltf antitrust suit, tried to block.       Coleman  T. Harold K. Orr, 31, president of Lubbock, majority stockholder in Manufacturing Co. on April 27, Superior Maiuilacturing Co., said the firm, got $2 million in tho'HkJO-the about $3la million received by en- same manner. FBI agents information about Estes' operations in March. He gave no details. 5. Fictitious collateral supported the notes through which Orr, Me-million   to  Estes. !Sp;�dden   and   three  other  men McSpadden. 45.   of.raised $380,000 to buy  Superior lealiu date o/i which otner in  worthless  securities terprises of Estes. the bankrupt West Texas financier, has disap- nance firms were aware that thou-peared. 2. Representatives of several t'i- started.  Robert  E. Clements of Amarillo. who sold the tank-build- Discussing a Pecos, 'lex., mur-tuarv owned bv Estes. Orr testi- isl. sands of fertilizer tanks on which ins firm, was aware of some of thev loaned the money didn't e\~ these dealings. The teacher replied, "Rat." jus not to come lo the dooi "No,  no,"  protested  the  lad he said. "Not that kind of 'rat.' 1 mean.   Keenum worked  himself the kind like in do it 'rat' now." 'and called police. 11 Orr said he and Kuel W. Alex-3. Estes conferred on numerous ander. 3ti. of Amarillo, shared an handled hy it during the period occasions with representatives of $82,000 interest in Superior Manu- vanished-a  chantv-Commercial Solvents Corp., New facturmg. borrowing $80,000 from UOVt       HUH      ^M^f,!.... ��-11 I i' 1 C 1 Hie men left the office and "toldjlied he knew ot only one funeral the  money free'ease. "Whai was the place used for? t York supplier of anhydrous am- Es'.es and putting up $2,000 out ol monia ierulizer which Estes dis-l    ^Continued Ou        Twoj \   

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