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Hattiesburg American Newspaper Archive: May 23, 1842 - Page 1

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Publication: Hattiesburg American

Location: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 23, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 T  WEATHER  Mississippi "Widely Bciitt«*d thun-rtiTshowers In interior this afternoon «nd In central portion tonight; Uttle temperature change tonight.  HATTIESBURQ AiVVERICAN  VOL. XLVI—No. 122  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY, MAY 23, 1942  Associated Press and Wide World Leased Wirt  ON $42  Chinese Fall Back On Island  Wipe Out Half Of Jap  Force, Then Retreat  More Insurance Also Discussed  WASHINGTON, May 23.—A senate-house conference committee agreed today on a general pay increase measure for men in the lower ranks of the armed feervices to a minimum of $42 monthly.  This tentatively rejected house attempts to raise the minimum pay of buck privates and sailors to $50 monthly, from present minimums of $21 and $30. 1  Senator Johnson, Democrat of Colorado, one of the senate conferees, said the pay raise as agreed to in con-| ference would cost the government about $285,000,000 additional each year based upon the number of men in the army, navy, marines and other armed forces on! January!. |  Johnson said elimination of the house attempt to boost this minimum another $8 monthly would save an  (Contlnuea on Page Nine)  (By Associated Press) CHUNGKING, China, May 23.—The Chinese hiph command announced ¡^tonight its troops had withdrawn to designated positions on Chiianshih Island at the mouth of the Min river in P^'ukien province after exacting heavy casualties on a Japanese landing force.  The Japanese smashed their way onto the island under the cover of )lane and intense artillery fire, the Chinese said. The Japanese landed! Wednesday and the Chi-  Bulletins  (By Associated Press)  pU W(  nese, greatly outnumbered, fell back after the  fierce fighting, the communique said.  The Chinese earlier announced that more than half the Japanese invasion force had been wiped out in the Chuanshih l.sland fighting.  This announcement followed swiftly a communique reporting the Japanese also had been repulsed In an attempt to land under the guns of warships on the north bank : of the Min east of Foochow, capital' and chief .seaport of Fukien.  While the Chinese did not claim the threat to Foochow had been smashed, they Indicated that the invaders had suffered a heavy setback.  Strength Unrevealed  There was no official statement on the strength of the drive against Foochow, but some Chinese reports said the Japanese had thrown 25,000  frustrated  Knock Out Two More Jap Ships  (By Aswxiatrd Prrnt merpd at Japan's rhicf advance  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Aus-' concentration centers without re-tralla. May 23.—Allied bombers have j spite .since the enemy moved into knocked two more Japanese ships Australlas Island roof.  out of the enemy's potential In-  EiKht Japane.se fighter planes rose  vasion forces gathering above Aus- to challenge the raiders at Lae, the  communique said, but five were shot down and "all our planes returned  FRENCH FLEET DNB, official German news agency, reported today that a powerful French naval formation was roving the western Mediterranean. ?  DNB said a British destroyer which left Gibraltar yesterday afternoon sighted the formation—a battleship, two cruisers and six destroyers—and put back into port.  Such a force might have come from the French Mediterranean port of Toulon.  British sources said they regarded the Berlin report (Continued on Page Nine)  Hitler Reports Red Collapse  Russians Admit Reverses In South  'By Associated Press^ (Jerman Field Mar.shal Fedor von Bock was reported throwing masses (if air-borne troops into the bh)ody 12-d9y battle of Kharkov today, and for the first time the Rusisians acknowledged reverses on the southern flank despite a toll of 15,000 Germans killed there in three days.  A bulletin from Adolf Hitler's field headquarters made the familiar claim that the Russian mass attacks on Kharkov, the Soviet "Pittsburgh,"  --------jhad collapsed completely.  Mexico Decides To Declare War  Ì  "left In a crippled condl-landlng effort was said to have „„^ „ ___^^ r _____  tralia and have pared his air strength by another 13 planes. General MacArthur's headijuarters an- i safely." nounced today. | Bp.sides the taiHW and the fighter  Both ships were In the principal, planes bagged In flight, two enemy Japanese Invasion bases among the bombers were destroyed aground island north of Australia. They on tTTf tae •iiflrome. were dMcribed as a large transport At Rabaul, the communique said, at Rabaul. New Britain, which was "enemy interception was Ineffec-  been backed by the guns of 10 warships.  To the north, meanwhile, four Japanese columns pushed across Chekiang, neighboring maritime province, and enemy raiders bombed Mamoi, a Min river port about 20 miles downstream from Foochow.  Kinhwa, provisional capital of Chekiang and a gateway to Klangsl province and China's interior, was in growing danger as one Japanese column reached Tunglu, .'15 miles southwest of Hangchow, and continued westward along the north shore of the Clnetang river toward Lanchl, about 65 miles southwest of Tunglu and 12 miles northwest of Kinhwa.  AtUu-k Iwu  Another Japanese column  tlon" and a tanker at Liie, New Guinea, which was "severely damaged."  The Japane.se offered only feeble resistance to these new air smashes, part of 'the po.sltlve defen.se plan by which Allied airmen have ham-  tlve," and "six heavy Japanese bombers were badly damaged."  The Australian government, meanwhile, moved to .step up thi,s continent's defenses by approving plans to treble the corps of volunteer ob.servers who now keep watch (Continued on Page Nine)  Evacuate 8,616 From Burma  MSG Commencement Sermon Sunday  Commencement activities for the sermon Sunday at the college audl-113 members of the 1942 graduitli}! Jflrlum. .  "Wsttchmnn, ^»t of! the Night?," will be delivered by Dr. W^Ulam H. Wallace. Jr., pastor of the First Methodst church of Corpus Chrlstl, Texas. The program, open to the public, will begin at 11 a. m.  reported attacking Iwu, about 32 miles north of Kinhwa, after an advance of 15 miles within 24 hours. The present positions of two other enemy spearheads pushing southwest were not reported.  A Domel report from Tokyo said Japanese forces had stormed into Iwu.  (The dispatch added that part (Continued on Page Seven)  (Bit A«MCtotc4 PrcH)  NKW DELHI, May 23.—United States, British and Chinese planes  HANBONE'S MEDITATIONS  By Alley  MAN SM DAT Í0UN6 MIST' WeNRV A. PLUM'  Fool fum wu'K- -But pat's all rígmt.  PAT suo PON' M£K 'iM FOOi^iSH ÎÎ  have completed evacuation of 8,616 civilians and Allied army wounded from war-torn Burma, lltterally snatching them from the path of the Japanese Invaders, U. S. air force headquarters announced today.  American planes alone, operating from bases in India, were credited with rescuing 4,288.  Obstacles surmounted in this  weeks, frequently bringing out double the number of pa,s.sengers they were designed to carry.  Cue American craft, for Instance, carried 72 refugees over many miles of mountainous jungle country lying between the fighting front at the time and northeast India.  The announcement from U. S. air force headquarters said:  "The Army Air Corps ferrying command has been working with the RAP and the Chinese National  REVEREND WALLACE  claas of Mississippi Southern college will begin with the baccalaureate  iBir AainrlaU« rrr>a>  MI';XIC() (""IVY, May 23.--Mrxicn l.Tckrd only I lip (ornuility of apparently rrrtain ('onRrrssioiml approval l(KlHy to liocomr a full-fledged ally In the war aunlnt, the Axi.s.  lirr dprisidii wn.s niario rapidly la-st iilKht n.s H wii'.r of public fury .swept the roilnt IV over the news that Axi.s .submannrs had sunk the swond Mexican inerrhant ship within eight day.s.  Hven wHTIft awaiting President Mantiel Avila Camacho'« formal proclamation of war, the first In Mexico's history, the republic put precautionary measures against Axis aliens quietly into force and took its first military st.eps, Dr. Brunner M. Hunt, pastor of: A special session of the ftill cab-  the Main Street Melhotilsl church, will offer the Invocation. The anthem, "My God »nd I," will be wing by the college vesper choir, under the direction of P. E. Marsh, jr.  Tlie college vocal octet will sing the hymnal "Pear Not, O Israel." | Members of the octet are Lillian! Cooper, Mattle Lois Herrod, Homer! Peden. Edgar Wright, Mae Elizabeth i Brigance, ElizAbeth Rlscher, George Oracp and Robert Thompson. LllUe Ree Ponder will play the prelude.  Taking a patriotic as well ns religious theme, the program will be marked by the singing of the hymn "America."  Commencement announcements will be made by Dr. J. B. George, college i)resldent.  Culminating commencement actl-I (Continued on Page Seven)  inet annovmced after three hours' deliberation that congress would be called In special ses.slon "to author  ize the pre.sident to declare the existence of a .state of war."  May Meet Earlier  Congrrs.s must be convened within 10 days, but next Thursday was .set tentatively for the se.sslon and there were indications that the arou.sed public might insist on a meeting still earlier, possibly next Monday or Tuesday.  The government's statement clearly define^ th« rAMwn" thst' swept Mexico toward war—the Axis" sinking of the Mexican tanker Potrero Del Llano off Florida, Us refusal to accept a protest of that sinking and then Its sinking Wednesday of the tanker Faja De Oro, all within eight days.  Survivors from the .ships still had not reached the capital when the the war decl.sion was made last (Continued on Page Seven)  achievement were glos.sed over In | Airways corporation evacuating the terse official announcement, but civilians and Allied army casualties It was learned that the planes ac- from the Burma war theater, tually had made as many as four , "The magnitude of the effort Is trips a day over a period of several' (Continued on Page Nine)  Subs In Gulf Take 36 Lives  43rd Review Honors Hero  The 43rd Division this morning held at Camp Shelby one of the  The official war department order for the presentation was read by  139 High School Seniors Graduated  One hundred thirty-nine high great people. That freedom Is school graduates faced a war-torn iieieshary for the development of world today after final exercises at i personality—and the development the gymnasium Friday night when of per.sonallty to its highest ability Dr. B. L. Parkinson, president of i-s the mcJiit important thing in the Mississippi SUte College for Worn- world "  en at Columbus delivered the com-; "In the end, natloiu win wars In mencement address. ' proportion to the development of  "Winning of today's conflict," said ] the finest, greatest personalities," Dr. Parkinson, "is necessary for the i Dr. Parkinson told the graduating freedom of self-determination by a' (Continued On Page Seven)  (•f a  NEW ORLEANS, May 23.—Axis submarinf.s ranging the Gulf of Mexico wcoiinted for the greate.st single las.s of life to date Tue.sday, May 1!), when two or more subs, attacking from oppoelt« sides, blew a medium-sired American cargo ship apart and sank It within three minutes with a lo,ss of 36 lives.  No counterroffenslve was possible because there was no warning, and five of the six-man gun crew were killed by the first torpedo. The other man was blown overboard and rescued. Seven pajsNciiKers and 18 of the crew were saved.  Thirty members of the crew and a passenger are missing and believed  dead. All were believed killed either by force of the explosion or being trapped in their bunks and drowned. The ship was blacked out and proceeding It 12 knots at 3 a. m. Central War Time when hit by three torjiedoes. which blew open the decks and destroyed two lifeboat«.  Survivors had no time even to don lifebelts. Two life rafts were floated and many survivors clung to wreckage until rescued. Survivors were picked up 19 hours later by fishing boats.  The submarine surfaced to survey the scene, but did not molest survivors, or question them. The first torpedo destroyed the wirele.ss room (CJontinued on Page Seven)  The Nazi command said the Russian offen-  si\-e sUrted May 13 with » Infantry divisions (perhap* 300,000 troops), three cavalhr dlvUloni «ad tank brigades.  ■ Suffering the heaviest blood and material loeaes, the enemy was completely broken up," the communique .said.  Connterattack  •The German counteratt«^ which started May IS, led Into th* rear of the strongest enemy grmq» and has cut through thia tin« cMl supplies."  (This apparently referred to Bock s flanking thrust 80 mllM low Kharkov.»  "For two days now, German, Wt/^ manl»n an^ HungK^ ttafted by atrong (ofoUAbut Üt German air force, havt bM» Ing counterattacks on th« front of the hitherto defentlvs to«!" tie."  Berlin military quarten aald Hm battle now was auuming "BtfMilll proportions' and declared that Bock's armies had shifted tnm lía» defensive.  "New extensive German úpente tlons are In progress." th«M IVMC* ters .said.  Without confirmation elamrtMr«. m Vichy dispatch said a powernil man counterattack had thrown Hair slan troops back to their OriCbMl positions on the Kharkov froat DriTe on Rostov  British dispatches "from the XHm-» man frontiers." reported that th* Germans also were smashlnf 1m«M> ly along the Tsgaarog-Itoftov tall* way In a drive apparent^ akM^-at recapture of Rostov-on*DMb northern gateway to the Oauexm oil fields.  Soviet repixrts said the Nut pm* chute troops and plane-tran^arlMl infantry descending on the (Continued on Page Smn)  ■  -1  J  "tel  Relief  ......— .ji^  RAF Goes Back To Work  U. S. Army Rtcruttliig Station  poBTOPncE BUHDINO  Hattiesburg, BAlss. 8EROT. JAMBS L. OLYMPH  DtML (R&I8) Is Accepting Applicants for  All TyjMS if Amy Stnrict  BglWBW AGES 18-45 mght and Sonda]« Call nO-J  largest reviews in its history for a | Lleut«nant-C<rfonel Harold C. Mun-quiet, ruddy-faced sergeant from it/! ; roe, adjutant general of the 4.3rd, Maine infantry regiment. Sergeant Romeo stood erect and  A soldier's medal for heroism wa.< Immobile while the naUonal anthem awarded Sergeant Annibal Romeo j was played and while the entire of Biddeford, Me., for extinguishing ! 43rd Division presented arms In hl.i a fire in a magazine tent, contain- j hone«-.  ing ammunitlcm after ordering all i Five generals were present to of his men out of the area and \ shake hands with the Maine infan-acting "with utter disregard for hLs 1 tryman. They were: General Hester own .safety. ■ i General Wade H, HaLslip, command-  Colonel Spauldlng Blsbee, com-4ng general of the 85th Division; manding officer of the Maine in- and Brigadier-Generals H. G. Bark-fantry regiment, presented Sergeant alow commanding officer of the Romeo to General John H. Hester, 74th F. A. Brigade, and Leonard F. divi.sion commander, who made the Wiiik and Haro'd R. Barker, both presentation. (Continued on Page Nine)  U.S.O. Donations Hearing $5000 Total  I ■—--  i Forrest county's USO susUmlng, Donations so far received amount I fund contributions are nearlng a i to $4624.35.  1 $5000 toUl it was announced today ^ In the picture published Friday I by W. A. Thomson, county campaign ; on the front page the name of one j chairman but Mr. ThOTWon believes j of the soldiers shown at the Abilene, ! the campaign already has lasted ' Texas USO center should have been i longer than necessary and he is urg- i Corp. Tommy Hawkins instead of : ing the workers to complete their Corp. Tommy Watk^tns. Corp. Hawk-f lists and report prompt'y to the ins is from Hattiekburg. i headquarters, | The names of additional contn-  i The countyt «uota is »6000. 1 (ContlDU«« on Pace NLnej  Puny Punch  Forrest county')« war bond buying campaign ii back on the floor today after Friday's sales, one of the poorest daily volumes since the May quotaof $119,900 wa9 assigned.  Friday sales amounted to:  $2028.75.  Total sales for the first 19 business days of May:  $84,604.25.  Amount of deficiency:  $3023.75.  Seven businenfj days remain in May. Balance of the xMay quota is $95,295.75. Daily average necessary  lenilda is $B5,:  to meet the quota is $5042.25.  (HIT AMnr4Bl*4 Pr«u)  IX)Nr)ON, May 23—Violent explosions on the French coast KX'kert towns on the British side of the Engli.sh channel today a.% vast squadrons of the RAF swept to the offensive once more after a night attack on the Nazi submarine nest at St. Nazal re.  People watching shells bursting some distance off the French shoreline expies.sed belief the Germans were testing new c(j«.stal defense artillery Irom a distance inland. The coast between Boulogne and Calais was clearly visible yet the watchers  hours, rattled windows on the waterfront in Folkestone.  Authoritative .sources later said one Axis fighter was destroyed and two British planes were missing.  Og.tervers at Folkstone said the fliers sped out at such height their only visible signs were vapor trails high in the sky. These soon were Joined by others In Intricate, winding patterns which meant, the watchers said, that German fighters were offeritig resl.stance.  The niKlit attacks, which included mine-laying operations in enemy  Additional contrlbutom to China Relief fund wer« listed by the treasurer, A. B. Cook. The names loQow: WilUe Mae Johnson. JuBtar school home ro<Mn, Mrs. B. D. liodr% Mary Moore MitcheU, Mr». Bltrit ittL vey, Mrs; E. C. Slmmwts. N. D, OSMl (.second donation), Ä. C. Mcliihia  and Rev. O. S. Lewis. ......• "  Total contributions lit>  date: $1055.71.  Forrest county's quota ii tMI> Prof. Dewey Dearman ia  chairman. He is urging pMi|d* have not contributed to taki checks to Mr. Cook so that ttM can be completed.  THE WEATHIt  Hattiesburg: Uttte twapwrtMt» change, scattered ttaïuidaniMfém this afternoon and tooigltt.  Gulf port : Little traiptratai« change tonight.  could not see gun fla.shcs before the i waters, were announced by the air ■shell explosion,'» | mini.stry It said all the raiders re-  The rannonade, la.stmg several ' turned .safely.  Floods Sweeping East Pennsylvania  inr A»M>nau« Pr»M> | in the borough of Honesdtle,  PHILADKLPHIA, May 23 — lated with transportation and < Rtreaiii.-) swollen by recent rains munlcatlons cut, residents reported rampaged through eastern Pennsyl-! houses collapsed and at least sit vania today, causing millions of persons missing, possibly drowned, dollars damage, loss of life, and The plants of two AsMciated compelling the vast war material; Press member newspapers« the producing plant of the Bethlehem highton Evening Leader and the Steel Corporation at Bethlehem to Mauch Chunk TlnMS-News, were .su^pend operaUons temporarily, disabled by flood waters totey but Two women died of heart attacks. 1 tContlnued on Paft NtaMi  Mississippi: Widely scattered tli«|. dershowers in interior this attenapatt and in central portion twilght: VMif temperature change tonight.  U. S. NAVT RECRUITING 8TXTIQP  CLINTCM tk  oau^vsM, RALPH K. nonna«  YeoBiBn, Are Aooqttllic  Th» 0. S. Nival  • aja.  to f mJB. «• I"  m  MS   

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