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Hattiesburg American Newspaper Archive: May 16, 1842 - Page 1

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 16, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 \ .  V I  WEATHER  Mississippi: Little temperatili»-change In east, warmer in west portion tonight.  HATTIESBURQ AMERICAN  EDITION  VOL. XLVI—No. 117  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1942  Associated Press and Wide World Leased Wire  BEDS WIDEN OFFENSIV  »  Laval Spurns  . Demands  Refuses To Yield  Martinique Rights  \  --— ■■'■'— —— —. .II-..I- I« _ i  (By Associated Press) VICHY, Unoccupied France, May 16.—-Pierre Laval, chief of govern-^taent, announced today that Vichy had informed Washington officially that ;  it could not accept the United States' conditions regarding the status of Martinique  Laval told the press that a note sent to Washington had declared the American conditions to be a "grave blow to French sovereignty" over France's West Indies?  Bulletins  (By Associated Press)  REPORT BRITISH SUB SUNK  ROME, May 16.—The Italian high command said today that Italian torpedoboats escorting a convoy had sunk a British submarine in the Central Mediterranean.  RAF FIRES THREE NAZI SHIPS  LONDON, May 16.—RAF Hudson bombers set fire to three German supply ships and hit "several" others in | attacks on two German convoys off the Frisian Islands in the North Sea last night, the air ministry announced today, j The British pilots raked the convoys from a low level despite strong German escorts, a communique said. Five of the bombers failed to return.  ALLIES RAID JAP AIR BASE  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Australia, May 16 —General Douglas MacArthur's headquarters reported that Allied bombers, catching the Japanese off guard, heavily blasted the enemy air base at Lae, New Guinea, and left  <Continued on Page Nine»  possessions.  "France will not relinquish any of her rights over Martinique, no matter what happens," the pro-Axis chief of government told correspondents.  The concluding words of the note said the United States government, "which knows France is in a state of misfortune and that she is doing everything to assure her restoration in keeping with her noble national traditions, would take a heavy responsibility before history by breaking, through unjustified violence, the ties of friendship which have always united our two peoples."  (The Washington government daredevil Chinese and maintains that Laval's government fliers who ruled the air.  Japs Strike Snag In China  (By AMMlBtrO PrrH)  CALCUTTA, India, May lß.—The , Japanese apparently have failed in ' an attempt at lightning conquest of China's Yunnan Province, thanks to a defiant Chinese governor who rallied his weakening troops and 1o  American  USO  Meet  Workers Monday  is not concerned in the negotiations i it is conducting at Fort De France , with Admiral Georges Robert, the 1  French high commissioner, seeking effective neutralization of Martinique. Washington maintains the admiral is the "ultimate authority" , and that Laval's reactions do not concern it.  (Thursday an authoritative Washington source said agreement had been reached already with Admiral Robert for immobilization of the French aircraft carrier Beam and cruisers Emile Bertin and Jeanne d'Arc, at Martinique. Disposition of some 150,000 tons of merchantships there is said to be another subject of the negotiations.»  Laval read what he said was the American note, which he quoted as saying:  "The present chiet of government of Vichy, having announced he would follow a policy of greater collaboration with Germany, it is no longer possible for the American government to maintain the agreements concluded by Admirals Greenslade and Home regarding the French possessions in the western hemisphere since these possessions are under orders of Monsieur Laval."  <U. S. Rear Admiral John Greenslade and Vice Admiral Frederick J. Home reached an accord with Martinique authorities in 1940 whereby (Continued on Page Nine)  The story of how a Japanese push stalled near Paoshan a week ago, leaving the enemy with a tough, expensive campaign still to fight -came today from aces of the American volunteer group who were in the battle.  These flying tigers gave the laurels to Governor Lung Yuen, a ftrmer Chinese warlord and trusted confidante of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek. They said he organized a successful defense of the province almost overnight, stiffening the-leadership of the scattered Chinese  sixth army retreating from the Shan states of Burma.  An advance enemy detachment had raided the environs of Paoshan itself when the governor assumed the military responsibility.  Within 48 hours, the American fliers said, the Japanese had been driven back from the Salween river and even now. although the invaders have been reinforced, Chung-kins reports that the Chinese still hold the west bank of the river in strength and the Japanese still are 55 miles from Paoshan, which is on the Burma road about 125 miles from the Burma border.  Casualties ! (The Chinese Central News agency said today the invaders had suffered more than 4,000 casualties in Yunnan in the past week.)  Tough Governor Lung was re-(Continued on Page Nine)  All persons who have volunteered or who will volunteer to work in the USO sustaining fund campaign next week are being notified to meet at, 7:30 p. m. Monday at the Front street U80 to receive instructions and pledge cards.  W. A. Thomson, county campaign chairman, is requesting everyone who will attend the Monday night meeting to telephone No. 3253 and sav so.  Refreshments will be served all who attend the meeting.  Forrest county is being asked to raise a quota of $6.000, one thousand of which has been assigned to the negro citizens  There are five USO's in Hattiesburg. They are the Army YMCA-USO on Front street, the NCCS-USO on Buschman street, the YW.CA-USO on Hemphill street, the  JWB-USO at Hardy and Pinr streets; and the colored USO <»:i Sixth street.  The five centers have aggregate annual expenditure of about $50.-000. The services of all are devoted ttf entertainment of men in the nation's armed forces.  F. M. Tatum, publicity chairman in Forrest county, said hundreds of letters have been received at USO headquarters in New York city from soldiers who praise the USO agencies.  One of the unsolicited letters is from a Camp Shelby soldier, Tech Sergt. A. E. VonDette, headquarters and MP company. 43rd division.  His letter, mailed to Rutland, Vermont, said:  "There are two things hfte that make Army life worthwhile. We (Continued on Page Nine)  Crush Nazi Resistance  Battle In Suburbs Of Kh arko v;Huns In Kerch  (By Associated Press) MOSCOW, May 1(5. The Rod army's power drive on Kharkov was reported today to be crushing stubborn German resistance in one after another of the strongly defended communities on the outskirts of that Ukrainian industrial center, pivot of Hitler's invasion of southern Russia.  (Unconfirmed advices reaching London said that shock troops had cracked the inner defense line of Kharkov itself in two points and had battled their ---------------------- - ------------------------»way into the northeast-  British Ready To 'Play Rough'  Custer Division Buckles Down To Work  Chinese Force Jap Retreat  to  The Custer division buckled down other belongings to be assigned to work today after flag-raising ! their outfits with the Custer Divl-ceremonies Friday when the division , sion.  formally was re-established as a 1  A number carried suitcases in ad-! unit of the rapidly-expanding Army^ dition to the barracks bags, and all ' of the United States. i looked about them wondering!) as  The division flag was raised at ¡ they sat in the big hall opposite the 9 a. m. Friday. Non-Divisional Scrvlce Club.  Three hundred and fifty selectees,  (Br tuMltM Pt*m>  LEEDS, England. May 16. -To the cheers of thousands of Yorkshire workers. Prime Minister Churchill declared todav that the United Nations have sighted the ridge beyond which the road leads downhill to victory.  Moreover, lii> \wuncd the enemy  "The United Nations will come to the top of the ridge and then they will have a chance not only of beating down and subduing those evil forces which had twice let ruin and havoc on the world but they have a further and grander prospect beyond the smoke of battle and  1  confusion of the fight," he added.  that British and empire soldiers now have ample weapons us well as con age and can play rough too" If he plavs rough.  Standing on the steps of Leeds town hall before a huge Uhion Jack. Churchill told a crowd of 25,000 that, "we have renched the period In the war when It would be premature to snv we hnve topped the ridge, but we see the ridge ahead now."  The enemy is not so ready "to r-i<Mme to this Island* because "he tie knows our arrangements for meeting him" which are "improving In powej and efficiency every day," Churchill declared.  Moreover, a "large portion" of the German air force is engaged on the Russian front, the prime minister added. The cause of the United Nations, (Continued on Page Nine)  Diplomatic Exchange Ship Docks At Lisbon  (By Auoctetcd Pre«)  (  May 12 and two other attempts on  CHUNGKING, May 16.—The Chi- ! the following day -all repulsed with nese command announced tonight j the sinking of their barges. I  that a Japanese force numbering i Other fighting was reported in | 10,000, with heavy tanks and 20; the vicinity of Kengtung, capital of | field guns, which occupied Mong j one of the Shan states, and Mong  who have been at the Camp Shelby Reception Center since May fi, met at the Field House Friday afternoon with their barracks bags and  Major General Wade H. Haisllp, j commanding officer of the Division | was there to welcome them and shook hands with the first soldier to (Continued on Page Three)  China Relief  More contributors to the China "Relief fund were listed today by A. B. Cook, treasurer in the campaign to raise a Forrest county quota of $2.000. The names follow: G. M. McWilliams, W. P. Jones, Lillie Powell, Mrs. Alma M. Cran-dall, Inman Cook, J. C. Penney company, Local No. 1204 IBE"W Mississippi Power company. Citizens Bank, Hattiesburg Coca-Cola Bottling company, C. M. Slgler. S. London, WaldofI Brothers, Faulkner Concrete Pipe company. Dr. B. D Blackwelder, L. Y. Foote. H. J Straussber#er. Herbert GiUis, Collins and King. Jesse Griffin, Carpenters' Local No. 1233, Dr. H. O. Moore. The Merchants company, W A. Lovett and Polk Hardware and Implement company.  Take or sen$ your donation to Mr. Cook at the Citizens bank.  Prof. Dewey Dearman. chairman of the campaign, already has announced that no personal solicitation will be made. He hopes the |people of the county will subscribe voluntarily the amount of the quota, o  Lin, in eastern Burma, on May 13, had been driven out of the town by counter-attacking Chinese.  One thousand casualties were said to have been inflicted on the Japanese and prisoners, rifles and munitions captured. Mong Lin, in the southern Shan states is about 200 miles south of the Burma road battle theater.  To the west of Mong Lin. other ■Japanese were said to have attempted a plane-protected crossing of the Salween river at Keng Hkam on  Hal.  This Shan states theater is some 250 miles south of the Yunnan province battleground in southwest China, where Japanese are believed still to be held on the west bank of the Salween river, about 125 miles by road inside China and 55 miles short of their supposed objective, the Burma road city of Poashan.  The main objective of the Shan states fighting was Kengtung.  Japanese thrusting toward India (Continued on Page Nine)  U-Boat Brings Warfare To Mississippi's Mouth  (Br AsMctetrd PrMt)  NEW ORLEANS, May 16  j ed States Gulf coast since the Civil An i war.  enemv has brought warfare for the first time in 80 years to the lower Mississippi, the historic bat'le-ground where the world's first ironclad warship appeared and where la?t a foreign invader trod United States soil.  An Axis submarine which sneaked into the Gulf of Mexico torpedoed a large American cargo vessel a mile and a half off the mouth of the river, killing 27 seamen. An explosion on a "Jetty" or reinforced bank of the river Itself was at'nb-uted to a stray torpedo—the firvt hostile projectile to strike the Uni'-  The cargo vessel was the fifth attacked and the fourth sunk in the Gulf by submarines during the present war The sinking, which occurred last Tuesday, was announce", here yesterday by the Eighth Naval district.  It was at the mouth of the Mississippi that the Confederate ram Manassas, the first Ironclad fighting steamer, led a Southern "mosquito fleet" that routed a Union squadron and temporarily ended the blockade of New Orleans late in 1861.  It was on the banks of the Mis-iContinued on Page Nine)  U. S. Army Rtcrulting Station  POOTOFFICE BUILDING Hattiesburg. Miss. SERGT. JAMES L. OLYMPH DEML (R&IS) Is Accepting Applicants for  All Types of Army Strrlca  BETWEEN AGES 18-45 Night and Sundays QUI TT16-J  Service At Gym Sunday For High School Seniors  Rev. E. K. Latimer, pastor of the Central Christian church, will deliver the baccalaureate sermon to the Hattiesburg high aebool seniors at Il a. m. Sunday at cervices in the high school gymnMftm.  The program for the service is a* foHows:  Matthews, Mary Louise Mozlngo, June Ross. Joy Ross. Doxology.  Invocation, City School 8upt S. H  Blair.  O Master. Let Me Walk With Thee" (Schumann* congregation  Holy Spirit. Light Divine" <Oott schalk >. congregation  Deeper In The  RED  Forrest county's bond campaign lg bogged down in "the red" today after Friday's sales, the lowest reported since the May quota of $119,900 was announced.  The deficiency, after the first 13 business days of May, amounts "to: _  $4165.75.  The deficiency is the largest occurring since the quota assignment for May was announced. Total sales Friday:  $1447.50  Total sales for the first 13 business days oé May:  $55,790.25.  Processional (audience standing). _ _ ______  "Ood of Our rather»" (Warren»—- Scripture reading. J. T. Wallace  Trumpet*: Tommy Wtibte* and ; The Lord'i Prayer" (Malott*  Tboma* Patten; rtotins: Mary Bess • tCouUmptf « n*, nine)  Apparently the people of Forrest county art willing to let the home-front fold up. Failure to buy our share of war bonds will help keep aloft longer the alga of Hitler's crooked etofa.  By HICHAM) G. MASSOt'K  LISBON. May 16.—The diplomatic exchange ship Drottningholin docked here today, after having anchored a quarter of a nule ««way lor several hour:,, and D2i! Grrnin:is, Italians, Hungarians and Bulgarians began coming ashore.  Many of them looked somewhat sad. for a large proportion were women with children who faced th" prospect, of war-time Europe's dangers and privations. A former secretary of Germany's Washington embassy remarked, however, "It Is a pleasure to feel free again."  One hundred twenty-five Americans had arrived by train from Italy for repatriation on thp Drotting-holm, among them the Rev. Hirairj  Gruber Woolf, of Elmlra, N. Y., rector of the famous St. Paul's American Episcopal church In Rome who was arrested Nov. 18 on suspicion of espionage.  Await Return Mr. Woolf, Harold Denny, of Des Moines. Ia., New York Times correspondent who was captured in Libya, and a United States army observer, Ma.|. Miehael Buckley, who also was captured in the midst of an African tank battle, were among 60 American diplomats and newspaper correspondents who arrived on the fouth and last diplomatic train from Rome.  Mr. Woolf had been tried secretly and sentenced to :!0 years im-(Contlnued on Page Nine)  ern suburbs of the town  while a wide flanking action. 70 miles south of Kharkov, threatened the communications network for the whole of the enemy's southern front.)  The Germans were putting up * desperate fight for Kharkov, coun-ter-attacking with tanks brought from the city and with air support in certain sectors and benefitting at the same time by rain and mud.  (A British report said that "within the past 36 hours rain and floods have been added to the obstacles la the way of the Russians, but the Soviet sappers, working 34 hours on (Continued on Page Nine)  AP War Book Out Today  The second Associated Press Wa* Book Is included as a supplement III today's editions of The American.  The first. War Book appeared ia February. It is probable th*t other* will be published later this year.  Today's War Book is packed with Interesting pictures, maps and Statistics pertaining to the war; and It also contains some commercial advertisements.  Keep the War Book. The militaiT information in it la valuable. -o  B. S. NAVY RECRUITING. STATION  CLINTON D. ELLIOTT, .  C.S.M., UJBJi. RALPH K. McNKTLL, Yeoman, 3c, UJ3.N.R.  Are Accepting Applications for  The U. S. Navy and Naval R«ienrt  Forrest County Courthouse. Hattiesburg, Miss. Hours:  8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Week Days) 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Sundays)  THE BATTLE FOR THE CAUCASUS OIL FIELDS  1«f Itj-  1 hit map »how» th« location of the rich Caucasus oil fields and the csmess el Unlit (he Ku*slam and Germans for possession of thenar«* that babMcf with vital war vanrrd {black arrow) In their major offensive against Kharkov (1), designed le line« to the Crimea. Meanwhile, the Germans claimed Nasi eehmuis had entered (l doorway u» the Caweanit fields. The Russians eeattn«ed 1« held »svastepet (»1 flank from that important «sap»it. v  ^sst/äaesi   

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