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Hattiesburg American: Sunday, May 15, 1842 - Page 1

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 15, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 WEATHCK  MISSISSIPPI: Cooler tonight; thundershower» in east portion this afternoon. Fresh winds on ihe coast thi« afternoon increasing In thun-dershowers.  HATTIESBURG AMERICAN  VOL. XLVI—No. 116  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI,  FRIDAY, MAY 15, 1942  Associated Presa and Wide World Leased Wirè  RED POWER SHOCKS HITLE  Heavy Damage From Storm  Roads And Utility Lines Suffer Worst  Bulletins  (By Associated Press)  GERMAN CLAIM BERLIN, May 15.—DNB announced today that Gorman bombers sank 7,500 tons of shipping in aii attack last night on Torquay, British southwest coast port.  BOMB AXIS SHIP  LONDON, May 15.—A Hudson plane attacked an enemy ship near Aalesund, Norway, Thursday afternoon and is believed to liave scored several bomb hits from mast  height despite fierce nounced today.  opposition, the air ministry an-  JAP CLAIMS  TOKYO. May 15.-—Japanese forces have inflicted a staggering defeat on the main body of the 22nd Chino.sr ' division in a great battle 17 miles northwe.st of Kuhsienchcn in Central Hopeh Province, Domei reported today.  Other Japanese units were said to have wiped out ap-(ConUnued on Page Foviri  A badly battered South Mississippi worked fast today to check up and #srepair damage caused by Thursday night's fearful rain arid lightning storm which burned out utility lines, smashed down trees, ravaged gravel roads and | sent creeks and rivers surging toward flood levels.  No fatal accidents, related to the storm, have been reported so far and damage appears to be confined entirely to public and private property. Surveys by v a r i o u s? —  - ^y  public service agencies follow:  The telephone company had about 500 phones out and pveryone worked all night repairing the damage, .said C. C. McGinni.s, district manager.  A bolt of lightning burned the Camp Shelby cable in two and emergency lines had to he ii.sed.  Lightning caused most of the failures, but trees and water also were factors.  The toll lines held up exceptionally well, McGinnis said.  The railroad lines reported no  6.16 INCHES OF RAIN  Rainfall during the storm totalled 6.16 inches it was reported today by Federal Weather Observer J. O. McRaney. The fall was the heaviest Mr. McRaney has recorded during tlie five years he has been weather observer here. The records prior to that time are not available here.  British Army Quits Burma  (Bj AiMMtetc« Prui) I the British from their Chinese Al-  Climaxing a bloody five-month ' lies commanded by the American battle against hopele.ss odds, the Lieut.-Gen. Josepli W. Stilwell. last weary remnants of tlie BriUsh ^ Japanese troops, heavily reinforc- | army in Biirma have crossed into ■ ed, have fought their way into | Manipur sUte in Eastern India, It j Tengyuch. important trading town was reported today, while a Vichy i in western Yunnaii Province, but ^ arch of rocks, with a ^.SOO-pound  Youth Dies After Rescue From Cavern  (By Aaaorlat^ Prr»)  PORTLAND. Ore., May 15.— James Harper, 16-year-old Hill Military Academy student who was trapped beneath a ^.WO-poinid boulder in a cavern for 13 hours, died shortly before noon today.  The Yakima. Wash., boy died while physicians awaited a sufficient recovery from shock to permit the taking of X-rays to determine if amputation of one of his legs would be Yiece.ssary.  The boulder fell on Harper yesterday afternoon a-s he explored <\ cavern in the rocky butte on which the academy Is located. The boy had lain under a shaky  source declared Japanese troops had advanced 80 miles into India along the Bay of Bengal.  The Vichy source quoted vague and unconfirmed reports that the ! invaders had reached a point within ! 16 miles of Chittagong, only 210 I miles from the great Indian metro-I polls of Calcutta.  fighting in that area still is in progress, a Chine.se communique announced tonight.  Tengyueh. 50 airplane mlle.s east; of the Burma border, is north of, the Burma route and was the ob- ^ jective ol a secondary Japanese, thrust.  The main Japane.se cohmin, which  boulder on his lap pinning his kns For hour.s after the slide he hiul joked with rescuers. He was ic-' leased at 6 a. m.. Pacific War Tunr Since 5 p. m, (Pacific War Timn yesterday the Hill Military acadrniy student from Yakima, Wa.sh., lay in a tunnel-like aperture formed by rocks which had fallen from a sheer clift of Rocky'Butte, on \vhlch the academy Is located.  He was trapped there when the rocks clo.sed the hole—forbidden to academy students—75 feet fronj its entrance. His two companlon.s crawled to safety. William Mahan, 1«, son of a Port iContmued on Page Eleven)  Nazi Chief Calls fw Help  Puts Pressure On Japs To Enter Soviet Battle  ^ (By As.sociated Press)  ! With American-made tanks blazing the way, Russia's armies were reported to have crashed through the inner defenses of Kharkov in at least twa places today after sweeping seven miles beyond the Donets river and smash-i ing more than 150 German tanks in two days.  ! London diplomatic quarters said they heard Adolf Hitler was so stun-: nod by the unexpected power of the Soviet offensive that he had instructed i an^ijaggador in Tokyo  Hitler Finds Reds Tough Foe  The withdrawal of the last British : has driven 125 miles up the winding , force, estimated at 5,000 men, fol- j Burma road, was reported still at lowed a dogged retreat from the j Hungmushu. on the west bank of  Lower Taxing Level Opposed In Senate  By DeWITT MacKENZIK  Wide World Wnr Analy.st Herr Hltlrr'.s .spring "offensive" Is stronxly reminiscent of the old Chinese proverb Hint he who rides a tlner finds It difficult to dismount.  Der Fuelirrr is conipelled to get nhrnd with his increasingly rilfflcult  1 huslne.ss of try iti« to break through i '»"s«" » I»*- trouble.  The Important fact Is that the Nazi chief is finding the Husslan tiger plenty tough to ride. However, having stated this we should pause and not rush headlong into any con-chislon about the immediate future of the titanic Ru.s.so-German struggle. Hitler is tough himself, and is  The  wa-shouts or other .serious trouble but telegraph and telephone lines were out for a time and men worked on some roadbeds all night.  Power failure cau.sed temporary stoppage of activity at the city water plant.  Bus lines reported some late arrivals but no cancellations.  The state highway department received no word of any bridges out.  A number of large trees were felled over the town, and small limbs were scattered everywhere.  Power company employes worked all night on the lines. Crews were still working Uiis afternoon on individual cases of trouble. All the main circuits damaged were repaired earlier. Both wind and lightning did damage.  Roads Damafed  "Tremendous damage" amounting to an estimated $10,000 was done to county roads by last night's (Continued on Page Elevenj  bomb-ruined city of Mandalay and a Japane.se thru.^t which separated  the swift upper Salween river, (Continued on Page Eleven)*  Bombers Down 7 Jap Planes  (B|r AMoeUtcd Trru)  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Australia, May 15.—For the second successive day, long-range Allied bombers hammered yesterday at Japanese shipping In the harbor of Rabul, New Britain, and scored a smashing victory over enemy fighters which tried to Intercept them, General MacArthur's headquarters announced today.  Seven of 17 Japanese planes which engaged the raiders in a furious  The Allied planes were credited officially with damaging at least one transport in the strategic harbor, one of the bases from which a Japanese' fleet sallied forth less than two | weeks ago to meet defeat in the ; Coral .sea.  Another formation of Allied bombers simultaneously attacked the ! Japane.se seaplane base In the De-boyne Islamfteroup In the Louisiade Archipela^ of^he southeast tip of sinliking an enemy sea-  (Ry awMtat*« Pr*M>  WASHINGTON, May 15.—Opposition developed In the senate today (o a proposal tentatively approved by the house ways anfl means committee to Induct millions of low-Income citizens into the ranks of Federal income tax payers Four top ranking members of th" senate finance committee voiced objection to a move- by the house group to reduce the taxing level to $500 for single and $1.200 for married persons, and Chairman George, Democrat of Georgia, gave it only lukewarm support.  Labeled "absolutely unfair," also was a proposal to require all persons who file federal returns to pay a normal tax of from $2 lo $5 to cover administration coKts,  Senators Brown, Dennx rat of MirhlKa!!. LaFollelte, ProBre,ssiv,-^ of Wisconsin, Vandcnberg, Repu'j-lican of Michigan, and Taft, Republican of Ohio, said they were op-|X)sed to the lowered exemption method of attempting to extract revenue from the low Income groups, George said he would accept It If nece.ssarv. but doubted (Continued on Page Eleven)  Maine Sergeant Will Receive Heroism Award  The highest award a soldier can receive while not on combat duty has been awarded to Sergt. Annibal D. Romeo, Blddleford, Me., Co. A  m  U. S. Army Recruiting Station  POSTOFFICE BUILDING Hattif;.burg, Miss SERGT. JAMES L. GLYMPH DEML (R&IS) Is Accepting Applicants for  All Types of Army Service  BETWEEN AGES 18-45 Night and Sundays Call 271fl-J  from their mission, said.  RAMONE S IIE0ITATIONS  By Alley  New Guin,  battle were shot out of the sky by plane anii setting fire to shore in-keen-e.ved gunners in the big bomb- stallatlons. headquarters said, ers, all of which returned safely Strike Back  communique The Japanese struck back bv twice infantry regiment of  ((Jontinued on Page Eleven) Crackers division.  For an act of heroism on Nov 14. 1941. when his regiment was at Camp Blanding, Fla., Sgt. Romeo will receive the soldiers' merial by war department order at a parade of (he entire division. Saturday, May 23.  Romeo was .sergeant of the guard last Nov. 14 when a fire was di.scov-ered in a tent containing ammunition and high explosives. He ordered other men on duty to remove themselves to a safe distance «"d  So foLKi CVAiMiM' T' g£ JimMERcRATS  NOW I Don' know HOW us SWiNt fAtk Room Foh Alt uv  'tfA 'ROUN'MEMPHIS.'  Army To Control Domestic Airlines  WASHINGTON, May 15.—Declar- or two-man ships. He a.s.serted that ing that more transport planes are almost anything that can fly is use-needed, President Roosevelt told a ful to the government, press conference today that we are | The President did not elaborate on getting into actual fighting more apd | what\ new fronts American men more and at more places all the | might be fighting soon. Nor did he time i care to answer a question as to  The chief executive spoke of In-1 whether American troops had taken j creasing American fighting in vari- part In the British occupation of ; ous parts of the world during a dis-, the French Island of Madagascar ' cussion of his order permitting the ; near strategic Untied Nations supply I War department to take over cdn- lines In the Indian ocean. I trol of all the planes of commercial, The airline order means that air lines ; domestic airline travel will be placed  We need all the planes we can get,, on a full wartjpe basis in the near I he said. Every kind Is being taken future, with the army operating or I over, he added, including whal he contr(?lllng the nation's entlr» fleet I termed as puddle Jumpers and one- (Continued on Page Roui  ^asé Goes On Short Gasoline Hâtions  without regard for hi.i i>ersonnl safety, entered the tent and ex-tinguDilicd the flames.  The !<|rgeant was commended for his bravery by Major G(?neral .John H. Hester, commanding officer of the division.  A vet^'ran .soldier, Romeo .saw oversea,'i service during tlie last war in Franre and Siberia. He has had nine years in the Tegular army and ten years in the Maine infantry regiment.  When informed that lie would re-c.elve the medal, Romeo said modestly, ■ f only did my duly as a .TOldier,"  "Romeo is a source of pride to the entire division," General Hestei asserted.  into the Caucasus, but thus far he i.'i continuing t.o encounter what to him Is the phenomenon of an enemy which, taking the picture an a Whole, retains the initiative. While his operation on the Kerch peninsula has met with considerable success, yet in the far more Important Kharkov sector to the north, where he really ouKht to be attacklns; with his 2.000,-000 men. he htnisrlt Is being flung back by a fierce Red drive.  position at the moment Is this:  Hitler's offensive against the Kerch penlniiula, which is the Crimean panhandle, is forcing the fiercely resi.stlng Bolshevist« slowly back towards the Kerch strait. The battle is continuing and nothing decisive had happened at the time of this writing. The purpose of this Na/,1 attack was two-fold: 1, Before the Fuehrer could under-(CkinUntied on Pag* Eleven)  2 U. 5. Warships Reported Sank  ' H.v A»«orl»lrll I'm»«)  BERI,IN, May 15,—(ierman aircraft were declared In a special an-nouncenient tcKlay to have sunk a United States rriii.ser of the 9.100-ton Pensftcola cla.ss and a destroyer in the Arctic ocean between North Cape and Spitzbergen.  "Further, an ice-breaker of :),0()0 tons and a nierrl||«t ves.sel of 2,000 tons were destroyW," the nnnounee-nient said, and "a 10,000-ton Irelghl-er was so lieavily hit that it took fire from stem to stern,"  DNB said the rnilser wn.s bombed Thursday 'north of North Cap«'," caught fire and sank at nildnlght last ni^ht. It was arconipanied by  .several destroyers and one of these also was hit by bombs and sunk, the news agency reported.  (The long Interval between the reported hUlIng and sinking of the crui.ser suggests adequate time for removal of personnel. The site is on the allied supply line ;rom Britain to Murmansk and Archangel, northern Soviet ports.)  Xpxt  The text of the special announcement follows:  "In atfticks on an American squadron yesterday the German Luftwaffe sank a crul.ser of the Pen-•sacola c'a.ss of 9.100 tons and a de-(Contlnued on Page Eleven)  to increase pressure on Japan for an attack  against Russia.  A British report said Hitler'« crack field marshal Fedor von Bock, who "almost" took Moscow in Um Nasi offensive last year, h»d been put in command of KharkovNi d*» fense.  The report said that duriiif tlw past 24 hours Oerieral Bode h*d tapped his reserves heavil]; In % fuUle attempt to stem the Sovttt drive against Kharkov, Ruute't "Pittaburgh" In the Ukraine.  The Germans claimed they ««r» Inflicting severe losses on the Rus* sians and asserted they had ûm-^ troyed 145 Red amy tanks In Um Kharkov fighting so far.  Crimea  In the CriiMa. Hitler's fleldlMWd«^ quarters asserted that fenders of thé heighta beforA short cut to the great fields, had been driven 'aiMl that Oennan-Rumaniati were at the gates o< tha  The Nazi communique mêtitteiMMl tersely that fighting waa oonttDQlllf in the battle for Kharkov. -  Soviet front-line dtqittieMli a«t|'. i the Red armies steadily wer| pr—- -sing forward, crushing Naii ^ terattacks, capturing a nunMr nearby communities, and over roads Jittered with of German bodies, smashod and cannon.  Red SUr, the Russian amy paper, said the battle «M heavy defeat" for the who have held Kharkov October.  The newspaper said teOl threw in powerful tan|( fgr^ that Soviet tanks fwoad « barrier, split the OcnaMMP concentration and drov* it into the enemy dcfeoMi.  "Then our infantry mam the breach and eonsoUdsted occupied positions." Red 8t*r  More than 30 wre^cad tanks were found at a stngto the Russian accounts aakL  Apparently referrio« to UM action, other reporte-sakl army was operating on th* bank of a large river whleli tt (Continued on Page Steven^  ---i-------^  Ú  Ship Sinking Strains Mexico's Neutrality  China Relief  rrpM>  Rationing of gasoline On the ea-st-ern seaboard became effective ai 12:01 a. m. (EWT) today amid a welter of predictions and suggestions regarding its far-fhing ramifications.  Chief feature of th# third and final day of ratkm-card registration yesti^tiay was a Wild rush by mo- ! torists to exehance ftreviously-ob-tained unlimited or high allottnent tickeU for those calUn« «or smaUer aUowanees.  Ricognittoo o( hornrt mistakes by ' iwtriatte «IM iMd over-esu^  HfM ténaoeH byl  rationing boards as the main rea-sfjn for voluntary surrendering of many liberal cards, but a possible factor was reaUzation by some that a stiff Jail sentence or a $10,000 fine rniRht be the penalty for miarepre-<,enting their gasoUne requirements (inversion of hom« heaUng plants from oil to coal wherever possible and federal subsidistng oí gasoline transportation on rallroids were ufged at New York as ways to ease the shortage in 17 states irom Maine Lo Florida.  - to «Wnpâojr employes.  ~ m fi§ß JBmrtm  Back In The Red  Forrest county h bark In "the red" in Its war bond canipaig:n to meet the May quota of $119,900.  The deficiency, after the 12 business days of May, amounts t<>:  1001.25.  Total sales Thursday:  2572.50.  Total sales for the first 12 business days in May:  54,342.75.  The qx^tm eMCi^ j^ 11 business days in iviay amounte^ #1031^5. After the 12th day the sufplus had shnlhk to « flMft deficiency. War bond buying is not a one-day fpr iiome-front civilians.  'H> A<«iirl|il«S •■rraai  MIAMI, m.. May 15.- Mexico's I efforts Ui prc.serve neutrality In tiie i pre.sent war were .strained today I after an Axi.s submarine stalked at i night a tiilly-llghted oil tanker and sent a t/irfiedo cra.shiiiK Into the Illuminated Mexican Hag painted on her .Mde.  Foiirtren men died. Including the captain and deck officers who had i gathered on the bridKe when the j undersea boat began it.t cat-and-■ rnou.se game half an hour before j the torpedo finally ciinie, 'I'wenty-I two survivors reached ,shore, but ' Rfldolpho Chacon, .'i4-veiir-nld seaman. died at a iioxpitul of internal injuries.  The ship, the 7,500-ton Potrero ! Del Llano, became an Inferno. I ThousandK of persons gathered on j the sands of Miami Beach, after i the torpedoing Wednejsday night, I and for hours watched the flames and towering pillar of smoke from the tanker before it .sank.  Protest  In Mexlcx) City, the government I addre.ssed a note to Germany, Italy and Japan last night demanding i "complete satisfaction and a guar-j antee of damage reparations" by Ma^ 21. tlireatenlng otherwise to | I "take a ixisltlon In accordance with | ; Mexican honor."  There were calls for a declaration : i ((Joiitinued on Page Eleven» j  t»  Additional contributors China (Relief fund were today by A. B. Cook,  Forrest county's quota kt Including today's list the tions so far reported totals $M4.3S donated by 101 (litag individuals. The lUt follows: ' Mrs. Alma Crandall, Ootdnt Bargain House, W. J. Itectta» K, ■ Evans, Dr. J. A. UmA, 0». ~ Champenois, John T. OotUMT» Mildred Wilis, V. U. HOtiUn. JltDM' bungle Stoftfa oonQMay «nd fT^. Hannah.  Need For U.S.O/s Services Mounting  THE WiATHiH  I HATTIEràUBO: Tbunderahov-ers today: 00«^ tonight.  OULFPORT: Tbtmdertbow«»,'^ today with sqtyUly winds; eoolir tonight. .  I  Need for the scrMif: the U 8. O, offer;, iin'n ui the arni'-d '.rrvlces is increasing ifteadily tiocar-e of the rapid expiinslon of th<' Arrin, Navy and Miinnf Corps,  M, latiim, puhlicitv chaDinan for the U, H. O. .su.staiMlng fund campaign in Forrest county, pointed Umt Uxlay the Immensity of the ser-Ivlce program. ^  Forrest county l.<t l)eu)g asked to roiitnbut« a budget of $6.000 to the natwnal U. 8. O. fund. The acUve .^olintatlon will commence Monday Mr. Tatum said the membership i of the United 8ervi«e Organisations  o  Includes every boy in the flglitlng uniform of Unc'e Sam. By the end of this year Uiere will be at least .3,600,000 of them.  Today there are 407 U. 8. O. clubhouses and 163 .smaller allied enter-jpri.ses. In all thfre »70 operational I units in communities tn 43 rotates and a Uialn of 1« ottMra rlng-I ins file woiid trom Alaska to Hawaii, to the Canal Zone and to Batisud».  The U. & o. uniu are mannad by a staff ot Ilia trained intìun.  In HatUtsburf Uters tarn »n V, & O. cent«» «Meh an: MM^ (Contimi«^ «B Pka^ itenttT^  tJ. s. HÄYY RECBintniG STÄTIOR  cuNTON D. BXionrr.  OÄJI, UÄK. RAUPH K. MtKSlUk Yeoman, le. PJIÄlt,   

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