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Hattiesburg American Newspaper Archive: May 14, 1842 - Page 1

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Location: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 14, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 WEATHER  Mississippi: Occasional showeni and thundprstorms this afternoon and tonight: little temp«ratar« change in ■iouth.  HATTIESBURQ AMERICAN  HOMEJUn EDtnom  VOL. XLVI—No. 115  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSÎPP1, THURSDAY. MAY 14, 1942  Associated Press ^nd Wide World Leased Wire Rlepoi^  ORDER  May Extend Gas Rationing  National Regulation By July 1 Forecast  Start In May, End In November  WASHINGTON, May 14 —Secretary of War Stimson announced today that "the army had ordered formation of four more infantiy divisions and the staging this summer of large scale, realistic field maneuvers which will place "emphasis on the offensive."  The divisions, latest of 32 to be added this year to | the expanding land forces, will be organized in September.! Six others already are in process of formation. j  The new units and their posts are: 49th Division,! Fort Custer, Michigan; 98th, Camp Breckenrid^, Morgan-field, Kentucky; 102nd, Camp Maxey, Paris, Texas; and 104th, Camp Adaii-, Corvallis, Oregon. i  All are reserve divisions, heretofore existing only on paper. The nucleus for eacli will be organized about June 15 and assigned to parent divisions for training until about August 1 when they will be available for their own  (By Associated Press) Stimson said the army field maneuvers would provide  WASHINGTON, May 14.—Petroleum Cordinator Ickes said today that "the most thorough training ever developed for American  NEUVERS  Reds Storm Nazi Lines  Drive Across Ukraine In Spring Offensive  any expansion of gasoline rationing areas generally would depend on whether troops," stressing air-ground operations, desert ^if^itinfr. Kharkov the "Pitts  the government decided to use this means of saving rubber and that there fiRHting, operationsn)y small task forces, and night i-pp^rted'rolling agí  was no need now for broadening restricted areas "from a petroleum point - - .....í ^^^--------- ' ---------  of view.'  (By Associated Press) Russia declared today that her armies were storming at the gates of Pittsburgh" of the Ukraine, and other Soviet offensives were against the (îermans in the vital sectors of Leningrad,  Instead of  year, when several  large maneuvers such as were held la.st' Novgorod, Staraya Ru.'isa and Moscow.  ral hundred thousand troops in two field In the Crimea, the Russians acknowledged yielding some ground  in »the  He told his press conference that the construction of a l,50()-mile pipe- armies struggled in mimic warfare over extensive battle- j^ix-day-old battle of Kerch Peninsula but disputed the Hitler high command's  T'^^r r, ^ i-V.^^-------—--—------- fiplHc fVlio xroar'c ovorpicnc mill Ko UmifoH tn trru-»r»o «/ifhin !__ " ______________________ i • i • • _ • _____  line from Texas to the New York - Philadelphia area was the "only sure  solution I can see at the "moment" for the eastern petroleum shortage, and announced a new application for steel for .such a line would be sent forthwith to the war production board.  Congre.s.sional cirrle.s were speculating on the po.s,sibility of nationwide rationing of transportation and exten.sion of the gasoline rationing, now in effect in 17 eastern state.s and the District of Columbia, to the rest of the nation by July 1.  Asked how long he thought gasoline rationing would last, Ickes responded, "how long do you think the war will last?" and added: "The best we can do is accept  Bulletins  (By Associated Press)  fields, this year's exercises will be limited to troops within I army corps. This is expected to save time for vital combat I training.  j Newly formed divisions will not take part, but will continue basic training  Beginning the last week in May and extending through the first week of November, the intensive training schedule | EARTHQUAKE IN ECUADOR arranged so that the use of army air forces and the i  /-TTAVA/-kTTTT tTo.To^^^ TV/Tow A ____________________ai'mored force would not conflict. Four maneuver areas'  will be used-the Southwest Desert Training Center, Lou-isiana maneuver area, the North and South Carolina area used last fall, and Camp Forrest, Tenn., and vicinity.  Stimson said the troops would be trained to operate smoothly in joint missions with both air and armored forces, the stress being put on effectiveness of so-called task forces. Another primary aim, he said, will be to toughen soldiers physically and mentally for any type of (Continued on Page Nine)  were killed and others were injured last night w len an earthquake wrecked buildings in Guayaquil.  Mlost of the victims were patients in a four-story clinic. Others were killed or injured in a three-story building  which collapsed in another part of the city.  _&>_  Immobilize Vichy Ships  GERMAN CLAIM BERLIN, Majr 14.—-The German high command said the "fact we have rationing, and we today that two British mptor torpedo boats had been sunk  have to go along with it, perhaps off the Dutch coast»?? actioQ snhsefSB.ent to a cl^flb light  indefinitely.  Meanwhile, an authoritative , ,  source said formal raUoning by Was acKnoWl cards would become effective in the Pacific northwest, probably June 1, when the 50 per cent curtailment order for deliveries becomes effective in Oregon and Washington.  Told that Texa.s had delayed acceptance of recommendations on crude oil production curtailment.'!, Ickes told new-smen that if that state failed to comply, "we could a.sk WPB to issue an order, which would provide penalties."  He expres.scd the opinion that (Continued on Page Eleven) -0-  naval forces reported yesteraay in one German boat  ged lost.  NAZI CLAIMS  BERLIN, May 14.—A special announcement said today (Continued On Page Ten>  China Relief  Allies Blast Three Jap Ships  Additional contributions to the China Relief fund were listed today by A. B. Cook, trensurer. The names follow: Woman's Christian Service Circle No. 1 Main Street Methodist church, Mrs. W. P. Peters, Prank Kramer, John A. Kennon, A. C. Ramsey, S. E. Travis, J. K. Travis, Forrest Hotel corporation, Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Kingsberry, Adler Furniture company, R. A. Fowler, Mississippi Central Railroad office employes. Miss Emily W. Clemens. Mr. and Mrs. John Stemme, Mrs. M. L.Patrick, Orpheus club, William Haralson and Andrews Harmon. Prof. Dewey Dcarman, chairman gj^ of the Forrest county campaign, ~ appealed again today to the people to Bub."5cribe to the county's quota of $2.000,  "We believe that many people want to give to the China Relief fund but they forget to send a check or take cash to Mr. Cook, treasurer of the fund, at thè Citizens bank.  "We are remindia? the public to contribute fo this worthy cause. The total received so far is about $500 Forrest county should easily subscribe its $2.000 quota."  (By Aitodatc« rmt)  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Australia, May 14.—Lashing out suddenly at the western flank of the Japanese invasion bases north of Australia, allied bombers last night sank a 3,000-ton Japanese ship at the former Dutch Island of Amboina and damaged two others. General MacArthur's headquarters announced today.  At the same time otner allied air raiders attacked Rabaul, New Britain. on the enemy's opposite flank, plastering shipping In the harbor  Funeral Rites Today For Shelby Crash Victim  F^meral services were held at 3 o'clock this afternoon Bt Camp Shelby for Captain Harlan Moore of Elwoocl, Indlftna, wlio was killed Wednesday when a .«smnll observation plane turned over while landing on an emergency field south of the camp.  Tech. Sergt. Nick Vlnss of Key  plane wa.s coming down for a landing when it tipped over. Captain Moore was dead when taken from the wreckage, it wa.s said.  (Captain Mcwre, who loinrd the Indiana National Guard in 1937, was inducted Into federsl service about 15 months ago.  He wa.s unmarried. His parents,  (Rr Aianrlatr^ rrtwi)  WASHINii TiiN. Mny H. - Frrnrh war.ships nt, MnrtliiUiue are belnst immobilized. II, wa.s authoritativfly disclosed lo<ln\  The immobilization is being carried out in cooporntlon between Kirnrh and Amrricaii naval and oIluM- ofliciuls Dii Ihf spot.  OUier import iiiit details of a comprehensive .soliillou of the problem of Piench i)os,se,ssions in the Caribbean aie still being dlscu.ssed, it wa.s said.  Responsible sources emphasized that these nrgotiations are b«lng carried on riirpitly with Admiral Georges Robert, Pirncli high commissioner on Martinique, and that the United States is not in anv sense  dealing with or looking to the Vichy government in thi.s matter.  Warships Bflfected by the Immobilization agreement include, it is underst(X)d: the aircraft carrier Beam, and the cruisers Emlle Ber-  claim of decisive victory.  Latest Soviet dispatches said the Russians  were now holding a new line In good order. inflicUng heavy casualties on the Germans.  A Soviet source reported that Marshal Semeon Tlmoshenko's Uk-raitie armies had smashed the German first-line defen.ses before Kharkov and were advancing on the city itself, imminently threatening the key Nazi stronghold.  All winter, Kharkov has been » major obstacle in the path of Soviet counter-drives. The Russians said masses of Red  tin and Jeanne d'Arc. ^ , , ^  It was not immediatelv disclosed »»"my re.serves had gone ^to actton whether any French merchantmen! first Ume against Kharkov,  arc involved in the discu.ssions now proceeding.  The German-controlled Parte press recently published that the United Slates had sought to requisition merchantmen lying at Martinique and that Admiral Jean Darían, com-mandrr-in-chiaf of armad forces unr-der Vichy control, had Instructed the commanders of these vessels to tConUnued on Page Nine)  and ralnihg explo.sives on 15 Japanese bombers surprised on the ari-drome runway, a communique said. The new allied blows emphasized warnings by Australian leaders that { the battle of the Coral .sea has not I ened the peril lacing this continent and that only continued a.s.saults upon the whole vast network of Japanese ba,ses to the northwest and j northeast can avert invasion.  The attack on Amboina, former Dutch naval ba-se, represented a round-trip flight of more than 1,300 (Continued on Page Nine)  B««!^ »»->..1,1. V. II .1 I l^''' »"'1 Mrs Vem Moore-of El-  Field, Meridian, who was piloting  the plane, suffered serious injuries He 1« in the Shelby ba.se liospltal. Captain Moore was observing his troops during a field problem. The i  The body will be sent to Elwood tonight bv train. Falnhild and Richard Funeral • Continued on Page Ten)  New Jap Ñaval Attack Expected  WASHiNGTON,'^May 14.—American military experts, Intrigued by Tokyo's solemn but hollow claims of a resounding Coral sea victory, concluded today that such bombast could only drive the Japanese admirals to a grand-scale assault on the approaches to Australia in an effort to save face.  Theise claims have become so extravagant In the last few days, It  45 Draftees Co To Camp Shelby  Forty-five draftees were sent to Camp Shelby s reception center today by Forrest County Draft Board Leroy Brewer. McLaurin; Robert Number Two with offices in the Ezra Lee, Route 1, Lumberton; Carpenters' building. ! Lester Fllllngame, Route 3: CarmT  The list of names and addresses | Green Reeves, Route 5; Van Buran follows: Bullock, Rout« 1.  Mitchell Watson Weathers, vol- Jackie Emerson, Route 4; Wilmcr  was said, that the Japanese may be compelled to try to make good on them soon by a new fotay In' tremendous force Hence authorities believe another big battle Is in the making—a battle In which the enemy might throw in some of his heaviest fleet units.  Other elements In the present strategic situation also impel the Japanese toward a large-scale naval attack. One is that the ejpemy E fleet strength has not been vitally impaired by the Coral sea engagement, disastrous as It waii.  If Admiral Yamamoto wants to icut the supply line to Australia i therefore, he would have to call up reinforcements and try again in the same theater, in some other area  ---j leading to the continent or else  Route 1; Prank Edward Malone, ' the vast island chain guarding Route 1: Curtis Pearce, Brooklyn, the supply line.  Risk Exposare  If the Japanese admirals do not iContlnued on Page Nine)  13 Nazi Troop Planes Shot Down  Out Of The Red  Forrest county's war bond campaign is out of "the red" today for the first time since the May quota was set at $n(),900.  After the first 11 business days of May the quota is exceeded by  SI,038.25  Total sales Wednesday:  $6335.  Total sales for the first 11 business days of May:  $51,770.25.  There are 15 more business days in May. You will have to keep buying more and more war bonds to beat that quota. Don't pull any punches.  i»f k — HmU» rrrM)  CAIRO. Egypt, May 14 German soldiers ,^kimmlnK the Mediterranean in 2n big .Junkers troop-carry-Ing planes fought back with their tommy gnns when an IIAF fighter formation attacked them on May 12 but, one by one, 13 of the transports cra.shcd lnt,o the wn. the remaining seven were badly damaged and two of the formation's Mes.ser-schmltt escort were lost,  Tlie full st,ory of this strange encounter could be told by the RAF participants only today, after yesterday's concise announcement in the regular communique from the RAF'.s Middle F,nst headquarters  Returning from a sweep of the Mediterranean on Tuesday morning, the RAF fighters, led by an Aiistr«-  llan wing commander who wears the Distinsuished Flying Cross, .sighted the large formation oft the North African coast.  The score of Junkers-SS's were strung out, only 50 feet above the sea, presumably en route to reinforce the bsttle-lines of Marshal F.rwin Rommell's African corps In Libva.  Eluding the hovering Me.sser-»chmltt-110'8. and downing two of them, the RAF fighters dove In to attack the troop carriers.  The occupants thnist tommy-guns out of the windows of the Junkers in vain attempts to beat off the British fighters.  "One after the other, at half-mile intervals, the Junkers crashed fContlnued on Page Nine)  and declared:  "Everything Is being lUMuidOMd by the Germans in great qusnttttot on the field of action."  Simultaneously, a Vichy (Preneb) source said the Russians Ind launched "massive attacks" paced by violent aerial bombing against the German armies at stursy« ROM and Novgorod, about 130 mUes soutb of Leningrad.  Heavy fighting was also reported raging on the Lenlngr»d tnait where the Germans were Mid to have thrown new six-Inch anti-tank guns Into action In a vain attmpi to stop the monster Soviet "Vwo« shllov" tanks.  Crumple First Lines Pressing an apparently major at* tempt to break out of long-bMtefad Leningrad, Red army troops Utt» said to have crumpled the fttfl German lines and captund IBcngp Important positions In Um satopdwy lines in a continuing advance.  Fierce action was repoftad. tiMw on the Moscow front, with ttta RUIm slans driving toward the trig QnN (Continued on Page Nine)  THE WEATHiK  WKATHERgrOBEeASl'  Mississippi: Occasional  U.S.O. Campaign  Begins Monday  The Forrest county campaign to tions will be listed unless a donor  ! raise »6,000 for the U. B. O. su.siain- requests that his gift not be pub-  iiig iund \mU begin Monday, it was lished,"  announced today by W, A. Thomson, ^r. Thom.son is a.sklng all who  county dmirman. m the cam-  Mr. 1 immson .saKi preliminary "  work Is now in progress at tlie U. Pa'R" who have not yet en-  8. O. buikiing on Front street and ''o"«'^ to notify the U, S. O. center.  that a call ha,s been made for workers to start active ,v)llcilation Monday.  The response so far lias been gratifying and many jM-ople have signed up for tlu' work iinrl a luim-ber already have iiuiilcd their subscriptions.  Mr. Thoni,Hf)n said  "An 'Honor Roll v.ill he published i daily in Tlie Hattieslmrt.' American, i starting Monrliiy. ai/fl all subscrip-  'Continued on Page Teni  U. S. NAVT RECRUITING STftTKHI  CLINTON D. ELLIOTT, CSM.. UB.N. RALPH K. McNEIlX, Yeoman. 3c. UBJIJR. ' Are Accepting Applications tat  The U. S. Navy and Naval Reservt  Forrest County Courthouse, Hattlesburg, Miss. ^  Hours ; ^ ^ J_____  8 am. to 6 p.m. (^eek O^n^ 8 a m. to 1 pjn. (Sundays),  and thunderstorms this aitmrngioii and tonight: little tempenMaim change in south, cooler In nmih jip. tlon tonight.  Hattlesburg and Oulfpwt: OCCft* sional thundershowers this ait#r-noon and tonight; Uttlç t^JjtnâMSI« change.  -0——— .........  unteer and leader. Route 3: Melvin Gardner, Route 2; Edwin Ward Blackledge, Route 1, Ovette: William Patrick Brogan, Route 8; Jason Shirley Steele, Route 1; Ellis Myrick, Route 2; Archie Maurice Travis. Route 2; Jerome Wilson phllllps. Route 4; Leo Carter McLemore,  C Entrekln, Lumberton; Ora Curtis Sumrall, Route 1: Woodrow Chan-i cellor. Hardy St.; Hascal Daughdrill,! Carnes; William Lucky Reeve.s, Route 3; Ebert Newman McSwain. Route «; Paul Smith, Route 5; Way- i Iqn Daniel Ryan, Route 6; Loyal !  S5th Re-Activation Ceremony Friday  New Tax Proposal Would Catch Millions  (Ry A»»>ria(>-<i prrao | because it would relmbunw the  WASHINGTON. May 14.-Secre- I treasury for the expense oi examin* tary of the Treasury Morge,nthau Ing otherwise non-taxable retonMk today advocated a minimum tax of At'-orK-polnt in the press omiir« several dollars " on every one wl)o ence In which he revealed the pto»  I posai, Morgenthau suggested 9 te «i  PeUl: James HartweU Hull, 225 ; Dearman. Route 6. Short _ÇplumWa; Lonnie Griffin William WUbum Downs, Route 3;  Le^5«Äoi3? 1, jy6ute 1,  tumberton: D. C. Lee. Lumberton; Sylvester  Lorenzo McSwata, Route 6; Homer jOeorgirA^m  Roy N^wioQW«  McMahan. Route 1.  George Van Portenberry. Petal; Lester Loyd Lyons, Route 1, Bond;  Route >;  SuterUng, Route 3;  The 85th (Custer) DivUion. which was demobilized 23 years ago following its participation in the first World War. will be re-actlvated Friday at Camp Shelby In day-Ion« ceremonlee which are scheduled to begin at 9 a. m.  The division, whkh was organized in 191T, and (temoMUzed two year.* later, will be ready sboo to train for  Koia Earl ft pu^ tn the eeeond World war Wertner Robert Rawls, Route A,|Hegwood. Rotate 1; Hasdy Thomas j Major Oenenl Wade HAIsllp. Poplarville; Gabriel Alvin Sumrall. HUl. Route 3; Duncan Bernard Ar-' dhrislon oannmnder. wi  Route 6. Bos M; Bennan Johnsoki. lUNite itatart Bettm Kennard.  win greet the  rincton. Route a: BUs Button Plynt, ¡ first at the ttoOMiida oC selectees Rout* li WUOMT 9mm, ll«ote U t«» bMt tflik  rienTal Haisiip and his staff will welcome the men, who arer,coming from replacement centers in many parts of the country. In front of division headquarters. The hew division flag will be unfurled and raised by a color guard.  Following the ceremonies in front ^t division headquarters, the will be turned over to thetr  frOTt men u^lt  ed men, is called the Custer Division, because it was at Camj) Custer. Mich , tliat the (Jiyisla» was fi^t oTgsntzed In August, 1917,  A railr^ of 1200 officers and en-li.sud m'li, who arrived at Camp Shelbv on April 17, has prepared thf area tor the new arrivals The  Durlnn the fiist World War, a ©errllngent of men troni the 85th Division was .sent to northern Rus-  enli.^tfii (aclre consists of men from commanders where they wlU be wifl- l the Second Infantry DivUion, Fort corned Into their regiiiMDta and as- | Ssm Houston, Texas, signed to their quartet». , The training schedule of the new the long lines of rommunlcaUon,  The diviilon, which WW be made ; selectees is tentatively set to begin which were In constant danger of up o( TOO officers aad MM «nUstl^' during the week of May 3ft. being cut by the eneoiy.  ^ files an Income ts* return, i Under existing laws, nniUlops of people whose per.sonal exempQons and othei' deductions exceed their income pay no tax at all, even sia and operated under British | though they have to file returns, command in the vK iiil'.v of Arch- i Morgenthau said his experts were ati,<iel and Murrnaii-k .studying the coastituttonality of the  Hi.story records (tint the Custer proposal, and if they found a legal men fought bravely during their method Of having .such a minimum, .service In Russia, the normal hard- he would ask congress te enact it, ships of war being Inlmslfled by the SlmlUr Preposal  deep snow, Extreme cold, darkness The secretary pointed out that a of winter in the Arctic Zotte, and similar tax has been proposed by  Senator Oeorft (D.-Oa.). chairman  of the Senate Pljunm Mmmlttee, who calls tt aa "eiamtnatloa (M.*  sulUble minimum, and eattmataA that the treasury could c<dleet tlML* OOO.OM a year through this "That's a tidy sum and use it," be commented, Morgenthau said the action yesterday In «otlni pefional iiieome tax a scale dUIerin« tram ^ gestlons were  ae exptalned that versal itf polittiaa to  semt lalw dkatiof tint-<C  .i.  \  í-■   

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