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Hattiesburg American Newspaper Archive: May 13, 1842 - Page 1

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Publication: Hattiesburg American

Location: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 13, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 WEATHER  MtMlMíppi; Scattered thundw-íhower» this iftenwKHi and tonight; little tempemture change.  HATTIESBURQ AMERICAN  HOME M»  Ebmoi  VOL. XLVI—No. 114  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13. 1942  Associated Prosa and Wide World Leased Wirt  BILL  Blackout Successful  Army Observers And Civilian Chiefs Pleased  Base Probably  Will Be $42  (By AiuoclBted Prew)  WASHINGTON, May 13—Approving a base pay schedule of $50 a month for buck privates and apprentice | seamen, the house passed and sent back to the senate to-j day the amended pay adjustment bill for all branches of! the armed services. |  The house refused to back down, on a roll call vote of 331 to 28, from its tentative action of yesterday in boosting the $42 base pay voted by the senate and recom i mended by the house military committee.  The amendment also boosted pay of second class seamen and first class privates from the Senate-voted $48 to $54. i  The present pay of a private and an apurentiee seaman  Nazis Claim Big Victory  Report Annihilation Of Kerch Defenders  appr  The blackout was successful. This is today's consensus of defense of- with four months experience is $30, while a second class .ficials, civic leaders and army aerial observers. » first-dass private receive $36.  Those who witnessed the test in Hattiesburg Tuesday night were unsparing in their praise for the conduct of the population and for the work of the civilian defense services, and nothing has come in from any of the other towns involved to indicate any failures there.  Laurel reported 100 per^ cent blackout. Only 18  (By Associated Press)  Members of the military committee predicted the , Adolf Hitler's field headquarters as.serted today that the critical five-original $42 voted by the senate would be the figure the day-old "battle tf) break through on the Isthmus of Kerch' 'in the Crimea, measure finally contains after emerging from conferonce gateway to the Caucasus oil treasures, had been "decided' with the annihilate adjust the differences.  seconds elap.sed between  the time the "red" .signal was received until the general alarm was given. There were no lootings or incidents of any kind. Ordinanl.v, several hundred telephone calls would be made at Laurel during the period coverea by the blackout. La.st night there were only three calls  Citizens Are Praised  Col. C. Fred Morgan, state direc- vote of thanks today for their co-tor of civilian defense, ob.served the I operation Tuesday in making the blackout in Laurel last night and ' city's first blackout in history a suc-termed it excellent.  Stop Cars  Citizens of Hattiesburg deserve a went off smooth as .silk," Chief Little said, "and I want to thank the  cess from every standpoint.  ^ ^ ^ The city blacked out as per orders One patrolman stationed at Bay ; immediately following the sounding  Springs who wa.s trying to get to Laurel, reported his car was stopped 15 times on the way by county | patrolmen.  The highway patrol said no accidents were reported. |  The sight from the roof of the ! itorrest hotel, from which poUit officials watched t)ie demonstration In Hattiesburg, was most impressive. As darkness fell, neon signs, street lights and headlights oji automobiles formed a glittering pattern which marked the area of the town. The first note of the siren at 8:20 brought an Immediate change. Lights went out abrupUy. Before the wail had ended, the .<<trcets were In almost total darkness. The change was effected in about three minutes.  A plane, cruising above, reported scattered instances of a liglit here and there, and within two to four minutes after receiving tlie report, these lights wer^s extinguished. The reports were received in the control room where Commander O. F. Kimmons and the chiefs of all the services were stationed, and were relayed to the wardens  of sirens and whistles at 8:20 p. m., and except for an occasional ray of light escaping through several poorly darkened windows the city was In total darkness lor the 30 minutes the alert lasted.  There were no accidents during the trial blackout. Police Chief M. M. Little said todav. "Everything  people of Hattiesburg for their very fine cooperation."  "From all reports," the chief said,! "our air raid wardens had no trouble j at all in stopping motorists who' were driving 'iai the time of the blackout started! Every driver pulled over to the curb, darkened his lights and waited for the blackout to end."  Bu*e«  It was reported that several buses were caught between stops when the (Continued On Pa«« Ten>  Japs Jockey For New Thrust  (Bj âl  Pretti  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Australia, May 13.—Resumption of the air battle for Australia's outer Island ramparts at an early date was predicted today by observers at advanced bases and throughout the area Allied airmen were on the who acted | a'ert to detect the first move of the  promptly. In some cases, the wardens themselves made the reports.  No incidents of any kind were reported to the Hattiesburg police staUon. There were no arrests, no fires and no ambulance calls. The entire "off shift" of the fire department was on duty. Mes.sages sent from the control room to auxiliary firemen and police found them  Japanese navy to renew the battle  lands to the north afTord a screen for the movement.s of this fleet, which is believed to have centered its operations of late about the island of Truk.  Weather conditions were reported today to have limited aerial activity throughout the northeast sector of Gen. Douglas MacArthur's land and sea front and no combat  The vote on final house passage was 356 to 1, with Representative Disney (D-Okla.) casting the lone di.s.sent.  Representative Brooks (D-La.) put into the congressional record what he said were official figures which showed that a basic pay scale of $42 would make Uncle Sam's privates the second-best paid in the world. The Australian private gets $62.10 a month, the list showed.  (Continued on Page Ten)  Present And Proposed Pay  WASHINGTON, May 13.—The following tables show present and proposed monthly base pay and allowance schedules for members of the Armed forces affected by the pending pay readjustment bill:  On^ PrcMBt Base Voted by Senate Proposed by House  Private« and  Apprentice Seamen .... $ 30 1st Class Privates and  2nd Class Seamen.....$ 36  Corporals and  1st Class Seamen......$ 54  Sergeants and 3rd Class Petty Officers .... $ 60 Staff Sergts. and 2nd  Class Petty Officers____$ 72  1st or Tech. Sergts. and 1st Class Petty Officers $ 84 Master Sergeant and Chief Petty Officer ... .$126 2nd Lieutenants and Ensigns ..........$125  tion of Hu.ssian.s encircled there and the capture of 40,000 prisoners. Heavy fighting continued.  ni.si)atches indicated that after breaching Soviet lines at the entrance  I to Kerch peninsula, the Germans still had nearl 50 miles to go to reac  Laùal Hits New Snags  I  BFRN. Swit/.crland. May 12 -ronlu.sed p<illluiil miinurvrrs going on in Viuin and Pari.s were in-leipipted bv soiiic Inlormcd quar-ters today a.s Indicntlon.'i thnt Pierre l.nval, Vichy s pni-Axis rlilef of gov-eriiinent, ha.s ciKiiiuitered new dif-  stipulations made by Petaln, the aged chief of state, or by Admiral Jean Darían, chieí oí the armed forces, was not clear.  Advices here Indicated that Relchsmarshal Hermann Wilhelm Goerlng remained In Paris, where  flcuUies for Iii'; pidni iiiii of briiiKing he conferred with Jacques Dorlot,  of the Coral sea which it broke; was mentioned In any theater.  oft last week.  The remnants of the first Japanese Invasion fleet were believed hiding In the the screen of Islands, waiting? for reinforcements.  Although dispersed, the.se units could quickly come together at the appearance of the main battle fleet.  ready and waiting. Boy Scouts acted which was believed to be gathered as messengers. I somewhere north of the New Gui-  Negroes Praised | nea-New Britain area.  Special commendation was given [ japan's Marshal and Caroline is-  by tho.se In charge to the colored j —-———--  sections of HatUesburg. Lights there j were extingui.shed 100 per cent |  The "all clear" signal cam», at ■ 8:50 p. m. ;  An observer for the U. 8. army, i 1 uomui 1 ■  BLACKOUT AT SHELBY  Camp Shelby experienced a 35-minute blackout Tuesday.  The air raid alarms .sounded at 8:30 p. m. and the all-clear at 9:06 p. m.  The blackout was a comp'.ete surprise to the soldiers.  -o--  HAMBONE'S MEDITATIONS  By Alley  There was no reference In today's communique even to the Lou-isiade archipelago, which has figured prominently in Allied reports since the battle of the Coral sea.  Correspondents who Inquired at headquarters about the absence of further news from the philippines were told that communications with the islands were cut, Norman Stockton, war corres-(Contlnued on Page Ten»  $ 42 $ 48  $ 66 $ 78 $ 96 $114 $138  $ 50 $ 54 $ 66 $ 78 $ 96 $114 $138  $150  $150  Chinese Battle Japs In Burma  (A private now receives $21 monthly for his first four months, $30 thereafter, and $40 after one year in service).  Nurses' base pay would be raised $20 monthly, to $90, for those withless than three years of service, and $5 monthly^ to $135, for those with more than nine years of service. As in the case of the Army and the Navy, the base pay is exclusive of additional pay for longevity.  Rental Allowances  Rank Present Proposed by Senate ai\d House  Prnnre Into lull military follabora-tlon with the Axis.  Laval continucrl a lengthy round of i.onferences nl Virhy hfter his return from M o u 1 i n s, on the demarcation line, where he talked yesterday with Otto Abetz, Adolf Hitler's envoy to Purls, but the expected announcrment of Important derl.sions was not fortliroinlng.  Whether this wiis due to new  the rightist leader who Is considered even more collaborationist than Laval.  (Yesterday's dispatches Indicated that one of the most Important matters on which a decision might come today was Vichy's relationship with the United States which In direct dealing with Martinique's governor Is Insisting that the Caribbean (Continued on Page Teni  Vichy Replies To U. S. Note  2nd Lieut, with Dependents $ 40  Without Dependents......$ 40  1st Lieut, with Dependents $ 60  Without Dependents......$ 40  Captains with Dependents $ 80  Without Dependents......$ 60  Majors with Dependents ,. .$100  Without Dependents......$ 60  Lt. Cols, with Dependents. .$120  I Without Dependents......$ 80  Colonels with Dependents. .$120 Without Dependents......$ 80  wen 1 SEE« A ecff 5TAHÎ To WAH,I'5E âUP I SE out. BüT Wshi PEY comes  HOME UOOKIN' so fiNt , I WÍJ5H I WUI- SÖUN6.''  CHUNGKING, China, May 13 — Japanese troops opening up a new front by advancing northward tip the Mekong river from "fiiiailand Into the Burma-Thalland-Indo-China border region have occupied the J own of Hongliik and pres.sed on toward Mongko. where the Chine.se engaged them, a Chinese communique reported today. ,  Another Japanese column pushing eastward against the Chinese Is still engaged at Kongkum on the Sal-ween river, the communique reported.  The pre.sent situation was riouri-ed. since the Chinese arknowledger!  reports from those Isolated areas were six to seven days old.  On the older front In North Burma, Chinese attacks have succeeded in cutting Japanese communication lines between Mandalay and La.shio and Bhamo and Mytikylna, the Chinese annoimced, thus Isolating advanced Japane.se forces.  The Chinese command said there was "no change on the Yunnan front," referring to the situation along the Burma road, where Jap-ane.se forces have driven well Into southwestern China.  The communique said "the Jap-IContinued on Pace Ten)  $ 60 $ 45  $ 75 $ 60 $ 90 $ 75. $105 $ 90 $120 $105 $120 $105  Higher ranks unchanged except for $25 increase for Brigadier and Maior Generals with dependents.  (Similar provisions for naval officers of corresponding rank).  For all officers entitled to allowances for food, the daily single ration Is increased ten cents, to 70 cents daily.  (Bv A>«"rllktrll rrr««)  VICHY. May 13, The Vichy government announced tonight that it had .sent a reply to an America n note concerning Martinique which "has given lisc to grave questions," The U-xt ol llie Vichy reply was not disclosed, but a <()inn>uni(|ue said the American note had been submitted to "thorouKh cxamluu-tlon" after the hurried return of Marshal Petaln, cnlef of state, to Vichy from vaciitlon early this week. The communique follows: "The American government rom-munlcated to the French government on May 6, through the Intermediary of Admiral lOeorges) Robert, high connnis.sioner of France in the Antilles, n nolo containing new demands tending to  modify the status of the Antilles at present In force.  "Problems such as those put forward by the American government has given rise to grave questions.  "They have been made the subject of thorough examination since the return of the marshal (Petaln).  "On different occasions the chlel of government (Pierre Laval) haa conferred on this subject with Admiral of the Fleet (Jean) Darlant (chief of the armed forces). Admiral Auphan. secretary of state for the navy, and Governor General Brieve, .secreUry of state for colonies.  "President (oi the government) Laval today sent the reply of the French government to the American government."  Kerch city. Just across the narrow Kerch strait from the Caucasus.  Informed quarters in London discounted the German claim of b»v- . . ing breached the Russian linea «nd described the Nazi report oi 40,000 Red army prisoners as probAbly I "greaUy exaggerated." Moscow wms M a r s h a 1 : officially silent. ^  The.se quarters said Hitler had i perhaps 2,000,000 oi his best ootnbafc -i troops massed in the Ukrain« and f was using 2,000 dive bomb«rt in thft Kerch campaign. The latter, it WW 4 .said, could be regarded as the opening of a triple offensive aimed at ' the Caucasus, with other drive« expected from Taganrog and Khwkev. T Ttte battle, regarded as « teat '"J phase of Hitler's long-hehOdMI spring offensive, started last rrld«y along a 12-nlile front on ttw penia^ suta. .'ij  Biiealaiii Uliagiwa.....................—r^  While the Germans claimed . • Ì smashing victory, à Soviet mid-itajr | communique reported "no «ubetui- ^^ tial changes" overnight. '<?  Thtu wmjld Indicate that neWwr -Bide had scored any major gyiw, .  A Berlin source quoted a OenMn""""^ war correspondent's deaertptlon -qT- —^ the battle, declaring that "awn than 2,000 Stuka bombers anu^wd É the first Soviet lines and cut • pftOt for the first Infantry advaoce."  Another German account in Hitler's newspaper said wave after WM» of Nazi planes blaated the Ruaitaiitk "blotted out' fortified "razed fortifications to the silenced Russian artillery, stroyed bunkers, machine-giia and tanks in great numben.  Soviet dispatches said the tettit was developing steadily, but g»v» no hint of a major NmI vlekiry Slid the ftttiekmur evtOt cry from the smadiing oÌfttMUW  launched by the Oemwns at tUl  and in the Bklkans in 1841. _ _ The Russians conceded. hOMM», that It was the strongeM fttta^ tte (ConUnued on Pi^ Bmni)  Fear 56 Dead In Mine Blast  43rd Review ^ay23  The greatest number of nuts ever to Uke part In a 43rd Dlvi-ion review will march Saturday. .Ma M. before Major General John H Hester, division commander.  Six atUched units will mardi m demounted fonnatlon with the division' during the parade set for n  rral Hester took command. It wlh be the second as a triangular division  The parade will mark the first Hppesfrance of three units as sepa-.-^aie marching groups. These arf I he headquarters and mUiUry po lice company, the cavalry recon nalssance troops and the signal they marchea  a. m. The outfit« are the Conner  icut-Maine artUlery. division tank company. Hitherto  destroyers, two engineer batullo.a a,s a group, an engineering company and a:> The reviewlnf stand will be lo-  I ordnance company. tated on 18th street, »outh of 4th  It «rid be the Ufth review pre- aveiW. The Une of march will be isented by Um divWqo itncc Gen-i alongXJItto atmt  Don Y Falter  Three days in a row Forrest courtty people have reduced the deficiency in the campaign to meet a May war l>ond and stiiiiiip quota of $119,900.  The deficiency, alter the first ten buninesA days of May, amounts to:  $684.75.  Total sales Tuesday:  $4852.50. •  Total «tales for first ten bui^inens days of May:  $45,435.25.  Here's one muy you can figure: Every time you buy war bonds you are helping reduce *the lengtii of the war, you are storing up interest-bearing saving^ for yourself and you are fighting the spread of int fiation.  Buy more and more bonds!  O.SAOF W, Vu , Mhv i:t - Ifrscue crews coiiiiiiii out of thf Ijla'itfd No. 3 mine of the Chnstoplu r Con! company aiuiouiicfd tiKtuy the rrrnvcry of the Ixxlies of victinm of the explosion and reported 2\ more remained ui.slde, hrini;iiiK tlie uri(»ííi-clal death toll to 6(>.  One group etnerKi d at 10:40 a ni. with nine bodies and at ! 1:4.'i a. m. three others were broWKhl fxil. 'I'he crew members, four t)f whom were overcome by ovrrrxt-rtion dcfp in I the niinek,previoii;,ly liad brought i ont 23 bodies.  One of the bíM-tn • r>'< o'rrcd wa.s  that of Tony Belec. .section foreman, who had not beet> listed as on du^.  David Christopher, official of 'fne mining company, a.s.sertert that the death list of 56 was not final.  Officials began a process of elimination to sec if otiiers might have been trapped by yesterday's explo-■sion ill « of ROiUiern West Vir-gian s largest coal mines.  10 Escape Reventy others narrowly e.scaped deatli when the bla.st let go at 2:20 p in EWTi In the No. 3 mine of the f^hrlstopher Co^l eomnanv At (Continued on Page Eleven»  Contract  (By Auoetot«« m««)  JACKSON. Miss., May Il^-Tta state highway deputmni« awarded a •«60.587 «mOlu^lar E. Morgan and Co. of Jackaon for a highway bypass road around Ouap  Shelby. --------------  The bypass will reroute Hltftwsy 24, which now passes dlnetfer ^«i through the camp. It It CM it A three road projecU apptrnwd i  neces.sary to the war effort. ., i  The others, for which blda received May 26, are a similar r«-routing project at the Cohunbi«|j^- ''' vance flying school «M one fw iJT miles of grade, drain and structure«  Plane-Carrying Blimps May Enter War on Subs  (Rv i i.««i i denberg, was taken by the house  WASinNOTO.N' MIV 13 — As naval committee yesterday when It  Axis siibmRrinet .M^Ukrri Hieir prey within »i;;ht of Ami 'i»';in •■li,>ref. I^enetIbIeven Into iiif St l..aw-rente rl'-'-i. tlie a!te:.'ion of ron-gre'îi. dra',vn t(K!;i\ to the  possibility of buiUlin« huKe plane-cariying dirigibles thaf could seek them out and destroy Uieni far and  struck a "non-rigid" limitation from H bill providing for 24 more blimps to augment the coastal patrol.  Pasacd by Senate The bill, already passed by the senate, was approved unanimously by the house committee.  Rep. Uaas Of Minnesota, the committee's Tanking Republican  between Bay St. Louisiana border.  Louis and the  THf WEATHIR  LOCAL rOKECASTS  Hattiesburg and Gulfport: Ooeft« sional thuDoershowers thia airtiir» noon and tonight; little^temperatiiB» 1 change.  Ü. S. NÄVY RECRUinilG STKTtOlf  CLINTON D. SLUÒTT» I CJ8JiI.Ì UJ5JÍ. RALPH K. McNKIUk Yeopan. k, UBjrJt Are Accept^ i^ypUllttjtaM  The U. 8. MATH WafêllMétt»  A nri^t step toward authorizing j member, declared the navy^ hands the ronstructicn of great aerial bat-, tihould be fTMd to construct rigid as tlewaionf:. as large n-^ or larger than I well as th« opo-rigld ^pe, for p«-the lU-fated German airship Hin-' (Cootlpudl OO PmP WHtmu   

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