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Hattiesburg American Newspaper Archive: May 9, 1842 - Page 1

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Location: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 9, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 ''■-ííí'  WEATHER  LOCAL FORECASTS  HattlesburR, GuUport: Slightly Wiirmer tonight  HATTIESBURQ AMERICAN  HOMEW EDITim  VOL. XLVI—No. Ill  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI,  SATURDAY, MAY 9, 1ÍM2  Associated Pres« and Wide World Leased Wirè Refknri  FORCE  LOSING  SHIPS  Losses Report Light  'Chasing Enemv  Mother's Day For Soldiers  Allied Fleet Battered  By C. YATES McDANIEL ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Australia, May 9.- Announcing categorically the basic outline of a clear-cut naval victory in the greatest sea fight of the war, Gen. Douglas MacArthur declared today that American losses in repulsing the proud invasion armada Japan sent into the Coral sea had been relatively light, and branded Tokyo's claims of damage flatly as false and fantastic.  The navy announced late today in Washington it had received no re-)orts to substantiate the OSS of a single Un\ted States battleship or air^' craft carrier in the southwest Pacific naval battle as related by Tokyo.  The navy issued this communique. No. 79. covering developments up to 4 p. m. EWT, today: "So'-ithwp.st Parifir: "1. The navy realize.s that the American puljlic is aware of the  * * ★ *  Victory Ends Invasion Threat  unreliable nature of any rlaim.s emanating from an enemy source.  "2. Recent announcement,'* by the enemy have made .sweeping claim.'; regarding United State.s losses In the battle of the Coral .sea.  "3. Reports received in the navy department to date fail to substantiate the loss of any U. 8. aircraft carrier or battleship in that action.  "4. Reports of damage to our forces are Incomplete. Tliey will be announced when the information will be without value to the enemy."  "5. There is nothing to report irom other areas."  In Ruccesfilve communiques Gen. MacArthur declared:  1—"The great naval and air battle off the northeast coast of Australia has temporarily ceased...  2—"Our naval forces — fought with admirable courage and tenacity and the enemy has been repulsed.  3—"Our attacks will continue.  4—"The enemy version of the battling... Is entirely fictional and has no semblance to a true communique of fact...  5—"His claims of damage Inflicted on our naval forces are fanta-s-  . tic.  A 6—"Our losses compared with his \ own are relatively light. The only N^eason they have not been published at the present time is because they would reveal to him Information of value."  The Score  With United States warships and bombers hot on the heels of the shell-marlced Japanese sea forte, this was the score already announced ofTlclally:  Japanese ships sunk: 11—  An aircraft carrier, a heavy cnil-ser. a light cruiser, two destroyers, four gunboats and two cargo or transport ships;  Japanese ships damaged: 0—  An aircraft carrier, a heavy crul-■er, a light cruiser, a 9,000-ton seaplane tender and two transport or suply ships.  (The second aircraft carrier m%v alito have been sunk, pn the basis of unofficial reports /  The only announced American losses have been three planes ^ Jap Claims  W The Japanese imperial headquarters claim which MacArthur declared "must be regarded Ift the light of propaganda' was boosted in Tokyo earlier today to seven ships sunk or damaged and M planes shot down.  The Japanese claimed they had «unk a U. 8. aircraft carrier of the Yorkto»-.ittj'pe; a U. 8. aircraft carrier of the Saratoga type, a U. 8. battleship of the California claw, and a destroyer. Tokyo reported as damaged a British battleship of tiv Wanplte class (a dalm dehled flatly yesterday by the British admiralty). an Australian cruLser of the (Continued on Page Nine)  By TOM YARBROUGH  ADVANCED ALLIED BASE, Australia, May 9.—United States victory in the great sea battle off northeast Australia ended temporarily at least the Japaile.se invasion threats to the island continent, American-garrisoned new Caledonia and Port Moresby, military authorities said today.  These same authorities warned against too great optimism, however, and emphasized ttiat the situation "still Is serious."  The Ji^nese fleet. Intent either upon severing Australia's lifeline from the United States or an actual Invasion of the populous east coast of the continent, wheel^ in desperation behind the terrific hammering of Allied planes and soi-face craft.  In their desperation to e.icape the  Several hundred soldiers will meet at the Front street I SO renter Sunday and will be available as dinner gueat.s on Mnlbrr's Day in Hattlesburg homes.  If you have not registered for one or qjo»»-s«Wt«r for iMnihrr's Day telephone any of the I SO renters and give your name, srt-dreas and number of men you wish to entertain.  Help make Mother's Day rsRier and more enjoyable for some other mother's son.  War Briefs  AKKIVKS  LONDON. May 9. Prince nern-hard of the Netherlands airi\p(l in Etigland today after a vi.sit to the United States. Aneta. Netherlands news agency, announced.  nants f the enemy fleet left long curly wakes that resembled the thrashing of a wounded snake.  The Japanese still have powerful naval and air forces in tlie vast area of tlip Soloiimon islands, New Britain. New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago and thr Mandated islands and It was this knowledge that prompted the military authorities to caution against bland optimism for the future.  Military experts recalled that the Japanese kept moving against the Treasure, island of Java througli Macassar strait dp.spite lo.sses comparable to those suffered since oMnday.  This time, liowever, the Japanese were forced to retire while in the case of Macassar the crippled and wounded iiiva.slon force pressed steadily forward.  savage attu^ which put 11 of their 1 In a correlary to the main battle, shipajt bottom/Of th#<^oral sea ) huge United Statc.s bombers found and I«t sA badly crippled, ^herem-  (Continued on Page Nine»  HONG KONG  CHUNGKING, China, May 9-Reports smuggled out of .lapanese-ocrupied Kong Kong said tocUiy liio Japanesie were transfrrriug nil prls-onert of war and civilian Internees to Formosa, posalbly with the intention Of converting Hong Kong into a powerful naval ba.se.  Two groups already have been moved. It was stated.  The fact that there have been a number of escttpes from the island colony is believed to have .something to do with the transfer. It would l)e almost Impossible for anyone to escape from Formosn.  Loading ftiid unloadiiK of stiip-at Hong Kon,'? is being tarried out at night under rigorous rurfew aiirl blackout, the reports rnntinued, anrt martial law is proclaimed on the slightest pretext.  Every time the Japanese governor or any other important personage moves about the street.v. people (Contlmied on Page Seven)  Texas Officers Will Move Soldier Today  Dead GirVs Car Found Near Prisoner's Hometown  Raoul Bernard, 2r)-year-ol(l Camp Shelby c()ri)()ral, is scheduled to be returned today to Houston, Texas, to face trial on an indiclmont charging him with the tourist cabin murder of Martha Elizabeth Daily, 29, Houston nurse.  Ted Walsh, investigator for District Attorney Dan Jackson of Houston, and Deputy Sheriff Jake Cok'a were expected in Hattioshurg this afternoon to claim the prisoner.  Military police said Bernard, who was aroused from sleep and arrested in his tent early Friday  "^morning a few houra after he returned to Camp Shelby from a furlough,  confessed that he fatally shot th* nurse and then fled from Texas In  her automobile.  Find Aoto Bernard has been in mlUtvy cu*r tody ilnce hi« arrest DiaMet Attorney Jackson said he had been advised by military authorities that Bernard would be turned oirer t<| Texas officers a« soon aa they reaeli Oamp Shelby.  The dead nurse's automobile WM reported today to have been reeovw-ed by the town manhal of Lafayett«. La., Bernard's h<»ne town. The e«r had been abandoned near Oarencra La., and a bundle of laundiry foVB^-  Axis Subs Sink Merchantmen In  Two Gulf  (By Associated Press) NEW ORLEANS, May 9.-First appearance in the Gulf of Mexico of very fast submarines commanded by daring officers apparently familiar with the shallow waters was announced today by the Eighth Naval district hoi'i' together with the loss of two nuMchant vessels the first reported lost in the gulf.  The ships, a medium size and a small merchant vessel, both inbound, were attacked in broad** daylight Wednesday afternoon and evening. One  wa.s sent to the bottom by a torpedo (Continued on Page Nine»  RAF Raids Nazi Aircraft Works  Japs Headed For Naval Exhaustion  (By A«MMiBt«« PrMi> the navy's statement last night that  WASHINGTON, May 9.—Japan ; "dcUils of losses and damage to our was regarded In Washington today; forces are iK)t fully known at pres-as headed toward eventual naval j ent, but no credence Should be glv-exhausUon through such wearing' en to claims that have been or may losses as those In the Coral sea. i be put out by Tokyo."  But ob.servers cautioned that the j If the Japanese had sunk even tide of ocean battle was still un-1 ship for ship, ob.servers said, the turned and looked for sudden new | engagement would still be an allied Japanese blows—possibly a con-, victory from the long term view, tiiniance of the southward thrust The reason Is that the Japane.se are  toward Australia.  In the absence of an official final summary of the fight there was a tendency to believe that the Jap-ane.ic had suffered far heavier lo.sses than the American units.  Many saw an indication of this In  believed to be unable to build fast enough to replace the major part of their losses American building is thus far well ahead of what tlM axis has been able to sink.  The navy department's latest of-(Continued on Page Nine»  (B> SttoelBl«« PrrM)  LONDON. May 8. — Big British bomisers pressed home attark.s from 400 to 800 foot levels last night to leave In flames the German aircraft works at Warncmuende, Baltic port for Rfwtock, in heavy night operations which cost 19 planes, the air ministry reported today.  The low level attacks were made in the face of "Intense defen.se" by the C'lermans of a target whirh the Britisli declared to be of highest importance in their campal«ii to knock fiut the -German air force in the we.st.  They followed by a few hours Sir Archibald Sinclair's declaraiion that the first ta.-ik of the RAF was to pave the wav for Invasion bv rnish-ing the Nfl/I air force at its bases  and at Its sources of machines— such large aircraft works ss that at Warnemuende.  Heaplane Base  There al.so Is a seaplane base at Warnemuende.  Resuming this campaign, fighters made almost constant cros.s-channel swfrps from dawn to dusk, and In the afiortioon a heavy formation of escorted bombers sped home from thi> Calais area, from which heavy explo.slons had been heard  The Britl.sh saw in the intense defense of the plant at, Warnemuende an Indication of the seriousness with which Nazi Air Minister Hermann Goerlni' regards the atla( k on such factorifs  In ('IIItlast to the defense at the (Cfititinued on Page Nine)  Chinese Cut Jap Supply Line  Boston  AMKBICAN  at Philadelphia.  port-  CHUNGKINO, May 9—Chinese forces which had been cut off in Burma have struck north from Taunggyi and recaptured Maym' " former Allied headquarters 25 mil^s northeast of Mandalay on the nnx-.severed rail leg of the supply muu-to China, the high command said today.  Thus, the communique declar<ri the principal line of communicatioi of the Japanese ccriumn which drov up the Burma road into Yui.n.an province baa been cut.  A Japanete force which attempted to counter mttack the newly esub-lished Chinese position astride the rail line "is being bottled up and facing annihilatkm." the war bu,-ietin said.  POmT ABCA ATTACKED NXW OCLBI,Ia4l*. 14*7 »—Japa-" ' " ' tim Chltta-'  gong coast of East India today for the second time In 34 hours as the last of the British Imperial forces in the Chindwin valley northwest of Mandalay feli back li>to the mountains for a stand near the Indian frontier.  A communique which announced the continued withdrawal of forces: earlier threatened with Japanese en-' -irclement, described the operation as successful despite intensive dive-bombing and machine-gunning attacks from the air.  No contact was made with the invaders' land forces, the war bulletin added.  It said of the aerial attacks that little if any tnilitary damage was susUlned. but it is feared that civUlan refucMs en route to India luffered eaaoaltles."  There vap no taomediate informa-(OonttBiwa m fH* Nioei  Still Ugging  Unless more Forrest county people put some punch into the war bond and ivtamp buying the county will fall far short of its May quota of $119,^0.  Total sales Friday were:  $3673.75.  The Friday sales were nearly $1000 short of the daily averag:e of $4729.45 necessary for the remainder of this month.  Total sales for the first seven business days of May:  $28,984.75.  Amount of deficiency for the first seven business days of May;  $3299.25.  Eviu-y time lales slump the daily avfr^ge climbs.  Nineteen more business days are left in May. Make every day a war btmd victory.  Bulletins  (By Associated Press)  FAMINE IN CHINA  CHUNGKING, May 9.—Chinese news dispatches reported today that a famine sweeping northern Hupeh province had taken a toll of more than 4,t00 lives and was causing acute distress to approximately 700,000 persons.  CHURCHILL TO SPEAK  LONDON, May 9 —Prime Minister Churchill Is expected to dwell on Britain's relation.s with Vichy in a speech at 9 p. m. (2 p. m. central war time) Sunday, the sccond anniversary of the lowland invasion which preceded the fall of France.  There was con.sidcrable speculation as to how far (Continued on Page Seven)  Lake Highway Saved Leningrad  (Bf «MoateM PnMl  LONDON, May 9 A broad motor highway acros.s the ice of l.alce Ladoga saved besir^pd I.enitiKrad from max.s starvation lasf winter and pre.served that vital anchor of the Soviet front, a Moscow source announced today.  It had been widely j)re.sumpd that an emergency communication.s line was set up between I.eningrad and the Rii.ssian rear, some quarters speculating that a double-traclt railway had been laid acros.s the deeply frozen surface of the lake.  Another Mowow report said that  the German.s lost more than 60.000 men killed and wounded on the Leningrad front during March and April alone.  The .sprlDg sun now b disintegrating I-eningrad's frozen lifeline but the commentator said that "not only is the city now provided with all es-fiential.s but It also ha« been able to provide reserve stocks for the future."  He indicated that when tl»« ice mrlts. lake shipping again will be able to lake on the burden of feeding' and arming Leningrad a.s well (Continued on Page Seven»  Blackout Ordinance Presented The Public  An ordinance directing pub ic at- THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI,  tention U> the test blackout ui HattlesburR Tuesday. May i:; wa-s i.vsued today at the City Hall over the slg-niiture of pr. J. H. (leorge. Forre.st county defense co-ordinator.  The ordinance in compliance with thr. law regulatmg the blacl;-out activities and Dr. George and city officials are urgmg citlzcni of Hattic.sburg to familiari«; themselves with Its provisions and al.so with the simple rules governing ac-lion.s during air raids Tile rules apiiear elsewhere in today's paper.  The ordinance follows;  FORREST COUNTY, CITY OF HATTIESBURQ ProeUmation civinf notice of a practice blackout to be held in the Citr or Hattiesburg, Mississippi, Tuesday. Mav 12. 1942, between the haurt of 7:30 and S:M o'clock p. m., Central War TIom.  Pursuant to the power and au thority conierred upon me by the laws, ordinances, rules and regula-tioii.s relating thereto. I do hereby proclaim and give notice that a PRACnCB BLACKOUT Will be c Continued on Page  Inside had tags bearing the of Martha Dally, Jackaon waa Informed.  The Houston diatrict attorney Mid he had been advised of th« loeatkm of an unnamed river between Hoim-ton and Camp Shelby, into which Bernard was quoted as ^vinf eald he threw a 3a-calibre revolm OMd to fire three buHeta Into Um of the Dally woman.  On the return trip to Bernard will be aaked to pqta£'-the exact spot Mfhtrt the ptotot thrown Into the water and  will be made to recover the______  The body of the nune waa ¿and Tuesday morning, in a bed tn » Houston tourUt cahin whera aha and and a man had reHatered the pre« vlous night under the names of Mr. and^Mrs. R. Bernard ot BlnnfB(* ham, Ala. A card and a telefnua from Bernard wu found Ifi tiia nurse's purse.  Qnaml  In his confeuion to mllitaJ7 po> lice, Bernard is reputed to 1  hav*  said that he ahot the nune aftec. the two had quarreled. He «aid thM after the shooting he started ditv* Ing toward Camp Shelhy in her au* tomoblle. He said he later abandoned th« car and took » baa i»-^ camp.  The Indictment charging Bernard with murder was retivned ft fclF hours kfter his arrert. —  The Texas officers en rout* tft camp for the prisoner were ssild to have In their possession a certified copy of the Indictment and a warrant for Bernard.  --:-o-—  China Relief  Ü  Less than t300 has been uted to Forrest caiint]r's> «{uota 9 «3,000 f(»- thè China B«U«t fund. U was reported today by A. B. Goek, treasurer.  Donations turned in since lion-day. when the campaign started. toUl 1395.10. Additional contributors ar«: W. B. oonidly, SunAine and Oarden club* N. O. GMUlf^ ,  C. ssui Jones. lIcArthitr let company, Oeorge  D. P. Camwoo. R. W. A class (a Walthall B. McDevm, a O. OuMlii:, Boucher and Baiicher and l|. den.  Take or sMid your Mr. Cook, eare of the I  Prof. DeiMy Deano»«.' campaign ctaalnaan. It peopte of th* MNtntir ' quota.  "Be guided Diy heart and )r<i«r Prof. Deeni|Htt.,  ummSSSu  tomitat . J   

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