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Hattiesburg American Newspaper Archive: May 7, 1842 - Page 1

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Publication: Hattiesburg American

Location: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 7, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 WEATHER  MLssLsslppi: Little temper«ture rhange In northwest, slightly cooler In east and south portions tonight.  HATTIESBURQ AMERICAN  HOME ARD  EOmON  VOL. XLVI-No. 109  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1912  Associated PrePs and Wide World Leased Wire Rtport  RIPS  FLEET  India  Japs  Nazis Report  Chinese And British Still Falling Back  Seven Enemy Warships Sunk  (By AMociated Preai) WASHINGTON. May 7.—The Navy announced today I that eight Japanese ships, inchiding seven warships, had ! been sunk in a naval engagement in the vicinity of the ; Solomon Islands in the Pacific and that four other enemy , vessels were badly damaged.  I The action was carried out with the loss of only three American planes, a communique said.  At the same time, it was announced that United States submarines on patrol in the western Pacific had siuik three enemy ships.  These various sinkings and damagings raised to more than 230 the number of Japanese vessels destroyed or damaged by the United States forces to date.  No details of what apparently was a great naval engagement involving Japanese forces striking at the flank  British Take Navaj Center  Retaliatory Action By French Expected  (By Associated Press)  BERLIN, May 7.—A Tokyo report said today that-lapanese forces from . . . . -  m had crossed the Indian border west of Paietwa and penetrated to «f the American supply line to Australia were given in the the Diego Siiarez naval base and surrounding territory on the str  iles fronii Chittagong. Navy report except as to results and the fact that it occurred north tip of the French island of Madagascar at a cost of something  Burma 62 miles  I Paietwa, about 80 miles north of the west Burma ))()rt of Akyab, is on the Kaladan river on the Indian-Burmese frontier. Paietwa is little more than 70 miles air line from Chittagong.)  (Tokyo reports receiv-ed. directly in New York have not yet commented  on such a ppiietration of India. Berlin in the past has Issued exaggerated reports of Japanese successes. \  Earlier a Berlin source issued a Tokyo dispatch reporting that the Japanese had seized Akyab, at the mouth of the Kaladan, by a remarkable drive over the steep Arakan M"niilaiiis from the Irra-  11,574 Captured  On Corregidor  (By AasnrUtrri Hn-sm  WASHINGTON, May 7.—The War waddy Valley to the East. (Japanese ¡department announced today that  units migfet have reached the Paietwa area by a similar advance or by following the Kaladan up from Akyab.)  BEAT ALLIES BACK  CHUNGKING, China, May 7.— The Japa|^ have occupied the Chinese t^ff of Wanting, on' the China-Burma frontier, and a mech-spearhead supported by planes has pushed up the Burma road almost to Chefang, 25 miles beyond Wanting, an army spokesman declared today.  He added that the Chinese did not have enough time to destroy the Burma road in this area, once an avenue of Important supplies for the armies of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek, but pointed out that the farther the Japanese advanced, the more exposed their lines of communication became to Chine.se flank attacks.  Blttir fighting wa.i reported raging as the American Lieut. Gen. Joseph W. Stillwell's out-numbered Chinese troops sought to stem the Japanese tide sweeping through China's back door.  On the right flank, Gen. Harold Alexander's weary British troops were reported still falling back to-  approximately 11,574 soldiers, sailors, marines and civilians presumably were captured by the Japanese on Corregidor and the other Manila hay fort.1.  The estimate was ba.sed on reports received up to April 15, a communique said, and did n^take Into consideration i^uraaltwr #n\ch might have been suffered in the last three weeks.  The total Included 2,275 naval personnel. 1,570 marines, 3,734 American soldiers, 1,280 Philippine commonwealth army, and 1,269 casuals, including civilians and individuals not otherwise classified.  The communique was issued at a  on May 4.  The communique began by saying simply that "very excellent news has been received."  Naval authorities declared that employment of the term "naval engagement" left no doubts that this was an action involving American and Japanese surface units as well as airplanes, the first on any considerable scale since the battle of Java sea in which the Japanese emerged vic-toriousL  The enemy ships sunk were listed by the Navy as a light cruiser, two destroyers, four gunboats and a supply vessel.  «  Those damaged were a 9.000'ton seaplane tender, a  (By Associated Press) TiONDON, May 7.- Strong British land and naval forces have captured  .........." strategic  more  than 1,000 men, it was announced today.  vent  Occupation of that key point on the Indian ocean supplv routes, to pre-its falling into Axis hands, was acccomplished 48 hours after British com-  ----------—'*niandos, marines and sol-  RAF Keeps Banging Away  pre.ss njiift'i ence by I he iUidrr-secretary of war. Robert P. Patterson, who said that Lieutenant General Jonathan M. Wainwright, commanding the American-Filipino light cruiser, a cargo vessel and a transport, forces, presumably was among those captured.  Comniuni(|ur The text of the communique, No. 219 of the war: "1. Philippine theater: "The total of soldiers, sailors, marines and civilians on Corregidor and the other fortified islands in Manila bay at the time of their capture by j the Japanese is estimated to be ap- | proximately 11,574. This estimate is based on reports received up to April 15, 1942, and does not take into consideration casualties wlilch (Continued on Page Thirteen»  Bulletins  (By Associated Press)  Jap Navy Active Near New Britain  LIBYA  ROME, May 7.—The Italian high command announced today that British armored units had driven across the Libyan desert to a point east of El Mechili, which is about 120 miles west of Tobruk, but declared they had been forced to retire under heavy artillery fire.  ward India.  -Ì  (Mr aiimam rnw*)  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Australia, May 7.—Increased Japanese naval activity in the waiters around New Britain, presaging perhaps a ■southward thrust against the lifelines of this invasion-threatened continent, was announced today by Allied headquarters.  The announcement also reported  INDIANS WARNED  NEW DELHI, May 7.—The government of India launched a vigor- ' activity by Japanese war.ships near ous campaign today to create a Bougainville in the Solomon islands.  fighting spirit in this country whose j ----  major political group—the congress | party—decided a week ago that the i only way to oppose a threatened Japanese invasion would be by "nonviolent non-cooperation."  Morning newspapers can led full-page advertisements warning the i public that work, not words, would i stop the Japanese. i  The same tJieme will be featured !  sofhe 300 miles ea.st of New Britain, where the enemy already ha,s established bases. The.se vessels were "attacked succr.s.sfully" by Allied bombers yesterday, the communique said, but it gave no details concerning the results.  The.se developmrnts emphasized the continued danger menacing Australia although headquarters report-(Continued on Page Thirteen)  ♦in posters and additional advertise  ments, said.  a government  CaHs For Halt On ]oy Rides  ,, . rubber .shortage wa.s "so acute" that WASHINGTON. May 7.-Under- the time had come to stop "Sunday  spokesman secretary Robert P. Patterson of the war department said today that the  trips, visits to Cousin Joe and pet-iting parties."  At a press conference Patterson predicted that tlie need for conserving "a million tons of rubber now rolling on the highways" would demand curtailment of sports events.  Patterson said present government plans contemplated voluntary purchase of extra tires held by the public. but not the requisitioning of the fifth, or spare, tire on a private Accftrding to revised regulations., ed Includes all officers, members of, motor car. pillltary personnel only may reglstiT ; the army nurse corps, warrant of-1 As for vacation.-;. Patterson saici xY and receive war ration books at | fleers and enlisted men who are the forthcoming rationing of ga.so-Camp Shelby. Registration is being' eligible to receive war ration books.  Shelby Ration Census Through May 9  MEDITERRANEAN ISLAND RAIDED  ROME, May 7 —A British assault on the island of Kupho, south of Crete, has been repulsed by the Axis garrison there, the Italian high command announced today. Kupho lies five miles off the southeast tip of Crete, which German parachutists captured from tne British after the fall of Greece last year.  JAPS BOMB CHINESE OBJECTIVES  CHUNGKING, May 7.—Japanese warplanes  ectives  warp in CI  made hekiang and  widespread attacks today on ob Kiangsi provinces, which during the past few weeks have borne the brunt of enemy air assaults.  The central news reported that Chinese machine-gunners had shot down a low-flying raider which attacked Yuhang in western Chrkiang province Tuesday.  I.ONDON. May 7 —Koyai All folic liiiiiilKM ( iiiitiiiuiiig their smashing attacks hi the industries feeding Adolf lliiln s w«r machine, hanmiered at .Shittgart litst night for the third .«.urrr.^sive night and roared into F'raiu-p hy daylight today.  Se\en of the niKht raiders were lost, the air inimslry said.  The raiders went in Qonsiderable force to smash at the southern German manufacturing city, which produces aviation eiiKines, tanks and electrical equipment, and at other targets In that region-;  Docks at Nantes also were hit for the third succe.ssivp night and raids also were made on airfields in Oer-man-oecupied territory.  The launching of the third successive attacks and Stuttgart and Nantes kept up the thenhe of the Royal All force -, nrw offensive of pounding time and again at key objective.";.  Thus in the la.it two weeks the nrtlsh fliers struck four nights in a row at Rostock, penetrated tn former C/.echo-Slovakia twice to strike at the Skoda works at Pllsen and bombed Trondheim in Norway twice.  Single rald.-i during (hat period were made against Cologne, Kiel and Gwinevllllers, a Paris suburb.  Following up the night attacks, a large formation of royal air fore« craft droned across the Engllsli channel at mid-day today, flying at a great altlude.  The German air force refrained from attacking Britain during the night but this morning four Mes-.ser.schmltts dived out of the hasse over the channel onto a southeast coast town a»id unloaded bombs which de.stroyed a large country home.  There were no casualties and little other damage was reported.  I--5  Shelby Soldier Accused In Slaying  conducted by Lt. Charles E. Dlehl, quartermaster rationing officer, at Quartermaster Warehouse A-1, Warehouse avenue. Camp Shelby. Military personnel to be register-  HANBONE'S lEDITATlONS  By Alln  According to regulations, any member of the armed forces not receiving subsistence in kind or not a member of an organized mess is eligible for war ration books.  line would go a 1«!« way toward taking care of that quesUon.  "There is no queitlon of the seriousness of our present rubber situation if present drivinf habits continue." Patter.son said. "Wa.ste-  MiT TCAM iAK PÊ MO' K MAM BRA6 OM DE Ufh UV A FAHMeR, ve MO' Ht  dom' miUxtR uve  Dependent« of military personnel.*ful practices of the past must noon  including all members of the familv bcrome only a memory,  unit will register, wherever they may The time may come when some  be domiciled. With th« local ration- workers In #ar plant« will have to  Ing boards, it was explained b'. have the benefit of tires now In use  camp officials. on private cars."  An officer who 1« a member of Pittterson and six other govern-  (ConUnufai on Page Twelve» (Continued on Page Thirteen)  Still Climbing  Forrest county is cowing with a rush in the campaign to meet its May quota of $119,900 in the war bond and stamp sales.  Total cash sales Wednesday were:  $5788.75.  This exceeded the necessary daily average of $4612  $1176.75.  Total sales for the first five business days of May:  $22,173.50.  Amount of deficiency for the first five hunness days of May:  - $886.50.  One more such lick will wipe out the deficit.  Don't stop there. Exceed the sum asked and get ready for the June quota which will be higher than the .May quota.  Keep on buying!  (My AiaorliilMl rrr»»  HOUSTON, Tex.. May 7 - A charge of murder was filed today «.^aln.st Robert Bernard, Camp Shelby, Miss., soldier. In connection with the slaying of Martha Elizabeth Dally, 29-year-old Houston nurse, whose body was found In a cabin of the Grant Motel Court*, on Main Street road Tuesday noon  The woman was found dead with three 32 bullet slugs in her head and left breast, in a bed in a tourist cabin.  Tlie man, dressed in civilian clothing, left the court In the woman's car and sped away toward San Antonio a few hours before her body, nitlred In a pink nightgown, wa.s found by a negro chambermaid.  British Cruiser, 2 Merchantmen Lost  (Hf Aiwxtal«« rm>)  LONDON, May 7.-The loss of the 10,000-ton cruiser Edinburgh and four convoyed merchantmen in a running sea fight along the storm tossed Arctic supply lane to Soviet Russia was announced today by the admiralty, which declared that »0  was no longer practicable in the* weather conditions prevailing."  The fight apparently was the same reported three days ago by the German high command, which said a 10,000-ton British cruiser had been sunk. This German version said six convoyed ships totalling 37.500  diers landed at dawn Tuesday, but only after  one as-sault had been thrown baek Wednesday morning by hard-flght-Ing colonial troops and seamen loyal to the Vichy French regime.  Prime Minister Churchill, reporting the acUon to the hpuse of commons, declared the coup had been planned for three months and that "in order to prevent bloodshed to far as possible, very strong force« of all arms were employed."  28 Warship« The French said the British force Included 23 warshipe, of which five were of heavy tonnage—aignliylnf batUeshlps or large cniiaera.  The war office, the admiralty, the ministry of informaUon and Churchill contributed to details eC. the quicfc conquest. wlUflfa l«**» with a landing on  side oi the island at Oourrirtr Bay ^^ and protressecW eaatmunl to ttie • successive capture Of the vtUafe U Diego, the chtet tOWt, AntMnm«* ; and the Diego Suarti mM teWi which lle.i deep in, t|lf bey eoutto-west of Antsirana.- '  Surrender terms ire being drafted and the British ntval squadroiik ' will enter the main harbor thla . afternoon as floon as ntoe* hwv* been swept up, OhurchUl stated.  It was disclosed that. In «ddlUon to the major landings at Oourrlttr Bay, other forces went ashore at Ambararata Bay to the south.  DlplomaUc circles here Wtn watching Vichy closely for ret»li»> tory acUon by the iPlerre Ii(Tel government.  Free French said this hiffbtillEt the form of some naval aid-te the Axis, probably the aUocetteci «f French cruisers and deatroyeri t» the German fleet  Informed British dl] sources expressed doubt the French Heet "would fight or for the Oermans."  Praises Freneh , Prime Minister Churchill praised the gallantry of the French and expressed regret that blood l)a4 : been shed.  British infantry preceded by tuivit bombers charged a strong Kimicll--.^ position—protected by 75-miBliiieter field guns and machine-guns—* I few miles outside of Antetrene. the. chief town of the harbor area, end ' opened the way for its captaue.  I'he French batteries aiEMil machine-gun nests were pulverted^ b]^ ! British bombs and sheU-flre fnai guns the British were able tO liuad.  Pushing across these poefUoni. tlMI parties moved on tfi captwn» Aat* slrana in the campaign launched «1 dawn Tuesday. J  Surrender The French commandera kurrtz)-dered, but some pockets of resistance remained, said a Joint maX flee and admiralty comnrnntjai.  »4  The town was captured in ft ffiWhl  tons also were sent to the bottom per cent of the convoy got through | In a furious running battle which attaclc last night, safely despite plane.s, warship and last.ed for several days. "The main attack was leuadhwd  U-boat attacks. The Germans admitted the loss of i from the south," the comreottfapie  The attacks, .severest from April 30 five planes and said one destroyer i said," but the landing of Bc^tl through May 2, cost the Germans : "suffered serious damage." > (ConUnued on Pad TmdMk  one destroyer sunk, another damaged severely, at least two dive bombers destroyed and others i)er-haps crippled, the admiralty said Two British convoy.s were target.^ of the air, sea and undersea assaults. One, laden with war supplies, was said to have got through 90 per cent intact, with a loss of three ships. The other, headed home, lost one ship iii bai la .St  The admlraltv said the Edinburgh,!  Seizure Of French y Possessions Urged  (Bf  WASHINGTON, May 7.—The Brl-completrd In 1339, w«^ struck twice ti-sh-French conflict over Madagas-by torpedoe.s and "later had to be i oar provoked now congressional dLs-i sunk bv our own fnrres as towing' cu.sslon today of the possibility of  8 o^Clock Tonight War Ration Book Deadline  ri'lzens must register, as the ration • Patrons and teachers are acting as i mis: ln;<  Citizens have up to g o'clock tonight to reglMer for their frar rat io:i book may be used for other things reKl.^trars. ¡oliu.'- Widne.%day to report three books. TImm irtM fatt to^ so will besides sugar. , Additional forms have had to be out of four lost. An elderly man net have aaaMher epportiBilty for Yesterday about 11,«» persons „..»„i nmes from Jaric*on  several «eelBhi.Midi'lirtbe mean- applied for books making a total of ! J 'T'"^" later rf turned to explain that It  time. «tA, aot lUm to purcha.se about »,000-for the first three days ^ demand from , had been in his pocket all the time,  •ny «ftt- Those figures should mean a heavy ^»"'C various schf>ols. ] ^.^o their books must  The mtloatoc ecfipe has found day today." said J. Watts Kom- Several unlucky individuals have , . appurstlon with the ration-that sone pefsoni ItOotL they do rumpr ratJomng board ehairman already lost their ration books. One;"" "" T^, Tj.  not IMV« to tMrtsr II tin do not Persons dmild go to the nearest woman who had seven of them for!W «l«^ V WWi^plm. Ail elemetttwy «IliBno obteln books.!her family has reported tU of tbem^for new ones.  Another went to the ration Workers at the oifn e are finding , ruch not knowing the other has done  that a nuinlM-r of certificate.s issued of the books should be  to dealers and commercial users of -^irr ^rtr^  Sri'ncompleii''''"''"' , ^»«i  Blanks for those who want mmui for canning have not vet arrived. | o'.» their surplus sugar. One A few cases of duplicate regMn-1 woman who did this still had enough tlons have been found. SonMMtaies sugar left so that she will not be I two members of a family «ift fljgn. elljiible for sufsr tor two years.  a United States move to seise French possessions in the «eetem hemisphere to prevent their aee l*jr the Axis.  Chairman cxmnally, Oemoen^ ef Texas, of the senate foreigii «slk^ tions committee advocated suelt ti(Ni only if the Madagasesr led to a 'shooting war* United States and Freneh but Senat« Pepper. Dsnoeral Florida, a committee member, immediate seisure.  Na Ttsse fer Nleetts* "I think we ougbt to and take those freneh (Continued on Pea*'  nocàh  Hi^ttsslwag «Ml  ..i., i^tì   

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