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Hattiesburg American Newspaper Archive: May 6, 1842 - Page 1

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Publication: Hattiesburg American

Location: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 6, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 i-'-rrr  WEATWEK rOKECAST  Mlssliwippi: Showers and loc«l thunderstorms this nftemoon nnd tonight; cooler in west and north portions tonight and in southeast portion lat« tonight.  HATTIESBURO AMERICAN  VOL. XLVI-No. 108  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 1942  Associated PrePs and Wide World Leaded Wirt  CORREGIDO  County Ration Census Lags  Only Half Of The Families Are Enrolled  War Briefs  (■y AM  REBELS HANCiEn  BAGDAD, Iraq. May 5 - (Delayed» Tliipp Bcrompllces of Rasliid Ali Al Gailanl in last Mays shnrt-llvrd revolt were hanged nt dawn todny, a day after their sentenrc to death i by a court martml. |  The three were Yunis Sabawi. a former minister of eronomirs; Co Mahmiid Salman, former chipf of the air forre; and a Colonel Fahml.' who commanded the Iraqi arniored. divisions.  STONES FROM BRITAIN  LONDON, May 6.- Sir Kmedlry Crooke proposed in the house of common,s today that hk)cks of stone  Other Manila Bay Forts Also Fall  3845 American Fighting Men Are Captured By Enemy  -'4  Thursday is the last day on which individuals may register for their from it,s Nazi-bombed chamber be  , • , • , T i-i. 1' i? T-i i. i i-- • I J V, • congress of the Unilrd  war ration books, J. Watts Kornrumpi, Forrest county rationing board chair- states and the parliaments ..f thpi man, stated today.  About 19,500 persons applied Tuesday, making the total for the first two days approximately 28,000.  "We do not know the exact population of this county, but we do not believe that more thant~~  dominions, each inscribed a.s h .symbol of a "common resolution to wnee war in defense of democratic government."  more  half the citizens have registered," Mr. Korn-  rumpf said. ■ There will be no other registration for several weeks."  The elementary schools, where the books are being Issued, will be open until 8 o'clock tonight, and from 8 ft. m. to 8 p. m. Thursday. "The schools will clo.se promptly at R p. m. Thursday," Mr. Kornrumpf said.  Classes were dismissed for the whole day Tuesday so that the teachers could help with the registration all day. Today and Thursday the school patrons will do the work until classes are over.  Following the issuing of the books, the problem will be to t^ach consumers and merchants the way to u.se them.  Stamp number one is valid May 8 to May 16; stamp two from May 17 to May 30; stainp three from May 31 to June 13; and stamp fotir from June 14 to Ju"e 27. JEach stamp will purchase one pound of sugar for the two weeks period.  TTntil May i6, the merchants ar« authorized to accept only stamp number one. If this stamp has been removed from the book because the Individual has a surplus supply of sugar, the latter cannot get any sugar for that period. He must therefore ration his sugar at home so that he will have enough to last until his stamps become valid.  Hull  Reply  Promises To Vichy  WASHINGTON,  hostile to the United Nations and May 6.—Secre- | hpncp ba.sis for a move against ! Vichy-rontrolled ba.ses flanking the Panama canal.  Auto Seizure Bill Endorsed  (B| AitMlkUd Prnii) WASHWGTON, May 6—Senator enrocrat of Alabama, .said to-  Vichy's rejection of an American note backing up the British coup on Madaga.scar called for a reply, and he added grimly It would certainly receive one.  Whether the reply would be In the form of a note or in the form of action, he left imanswered.  He wa-s non-committal, too, when asked at his press conference about the feeling in diplomatic circles here that Vichy's resistance to the occupi^n of Madagaicar was an act which might be construed as  Hull was asl4f?d whether this gov-crninent considered French resistance to the British on Madagascar a.s a warlike act within the meaning of the American note handed to the French ambassador Monday night.  No Information He replied that he had no Information on the progress of the situation in Madagascar and preferred at this time to rest on the state-(Continuea on Page Nine)  VICAR WOUNDED  CHUNGKING, May 6.—Monsignor Xavler Jantzen, apostolic vicar of Chungking, was .stabbed and seriously wounded by a robber who broke Into his room at 2 a. ni. Monday, but a phy.sician pronounced him out of danger today.  (French Catholic missionary headquarters in I,yon reported ye.sterrlay that Monslgnor .fantien had been "a.s.sa8sinated" nt his residence, but that details were not available.)  The monslgnor resisted fiercely and the robber fled without lotit, ; leaving intact a box containing 40,-i 000 Chinese dollars received the day before. Cut on the hand, the victim wa.s still weak from loss of blood.  (By Associated Press)  WASHINGTON, May (>.—Corrogidor "fortress fell into the hands of the Japanese, the War department reported today, after being luninded into helplessness by unceasing artillery fire and bomb-lardment from the air.  The surrendei- of the guardian of Manila Bay came after 28 days of siege climaxed by a day of constant firing which swept away the beach defenses and made it possible for the invaders to pour  ^ashore from steel barges. The tired defenders  STAMP SALE IN HAWAII  HONOLULU, May 6. - John Sncll, deputy adnunistrator for the sale of war .savings stamps, said a final tabulation showed Hawaii's May day quota of $250,000 had been over-■sold four times for a total of $1,-017,7Sft, May day is observed as Lei day in Hawaii.  Stuttgart Again  Hill, Dei  day that Price Administrator Leon Henderson and Robert P. Patterson, undersecretary of war. had approved in principle a pending bill to authorize the government to requisition private automobiles and pay for them.  Appearing before the senate military committee in a closed session, the two officials also were said by Hill to have indorsed the principle of another measure whicli would establish a national speed limit of 40 miles and provide for the confiscation of the autos of persons convicted of exceeding it.  Hill told reporters that Henderson and Patterson appeared to be interested chiefly in the conseivation of rubber for essential civilian uses and advocated pa-ssage by congress of legislation similar to that now under consideration for the psycho-i logical effect such a move would have on the motoring public.  The auto seizure bill, introduced by Senator Downey, Democrat of California, would authorize expenditures up to t5!000.000,000 for the purchase of requisitioned private cars or parts. Thus if it were passed by congre.ss a spare tire might be j requisitioned by the government or \  (By Ai«wlB(«d Pm*>  LONDON, JMay 6.—Industrial plants in ^flWyrt again were  i^^MPW^f' !^cond  night ii^jSwlSlK last night and attacked other.  Germany, the  ay.  :<18'weM the third In a row agamR«acrmany since the start of a new serf« of aerlaj assaults Sunday on Adolf Hitler^ war and Industrial machines.  From the.se and other engagements, four bombers are missing, the air ministry announced.  It said the docks at Nantes were again bombed and airdromes of northern France and the Low Countries were, attacked.  Informed sources said the RAF crews again encountered clotidy weather over southern Germany which prevented detailed observation of the results.  A temporary waning of Nazi retaliatory raids was evident a.s the RAF pursued a program of destruc  tion Which has taken heavy bomber command units Into Germany 21 times since April 1.  Light German forces made dusk and dawti forays against southea.st Engltsh poastHl districts with bombs and gunfire, killing two or more per-.sons and causing some damage. Four planes took part in the twilight attack. Two executed the morning raid.  Quiet At Night  A communique of the ministries of air and home security announced, however, that "during the hours of darkness there was nothing to report"  The night raid into Germany followed four daylight sweeps across the Engli-sh channel against German bases in Zeebrugge, Belgium, and occupied France. Six British planes were reported missing from these engagements against four German I craft shot down.  i A Vichy announcement said anti-(Continued on Page Nine)  TRANSPORTATION MEETING  ! JACKSON—Directors of trucking firms and repre.sentatives of the i state highway patrol meet Thursday i to review a request of the office of defense transportation that a trucks maximum load on state highways be increased from the 20,000 pounds to 41,000 pounds.  Fall Of Madagascar Naval Base Imminent  (By Associated Press) LONDON, May 6.- With" waves of bombers and light tanks the British blasted their way into the outskirts of the Madagascar naval -base of Di^go Suarez today despite heavy casualties inflicted by the bitterly-resisting French colonials. '  An appeal tw Pierre Laval's pro-derman Vichy government, for Axis, aid against the British was forecast by free French sources in London after a day of furious by the Vichy  a day of furious activity« Some predicte«h^Sv«l i  might declare war on Brit*m. | Informed sources here ^pressed ' belief that the British advance on the big Indian Ocean Island was still progre.ssing favorably after more than 3fl hours and said advanced Britl.sh units already were; ill tiie outskirts of Diego Stiarez, on I,he northeast tip of the island. The small port of Antislrana, on iContlnued on Page Seven)  Americans 65 Jap Planes  long had b^en cut off  from supplies and reinforetmtata.  The Navy announced today th«t there were 3.846 officers and men of the Navy and Marine Corps on Corregidor when that fortreM itQ to Japanese invaders and 'It U sumed that all of these officers and men have been captured and «ill be held as prisoners of war."  A communique covering the lart hours of the defense of m viliani fortress also disclosed that flv« small naval ships were kwt tltlMr to enemy bombers or gunflt« or by destruction by American fortt» to prevent their falling Into enemy iiands.  These were Identified at the min* sweepers Tanager, Pigeon aiwLQu»!]. and the old Yangtse rtv^r guftbwt Oahu an4 Luzon. , .  Several miMagea from nv aonnel at Corregidor were ; to the Navy departmtnt only tfal« morning, the oonununkiue Mid. «nil Oap^ln Kenneth U, Mocff^ 41^ of Cambi^e, Maatn Joined hi« tiS-tnd me  Clamp Down On Credit Buying  ihf A»  USO Campaign Here Actively Starts May 18  WASHINGTON, May 6 T h e government today put a set of teeth in President Roosevelt's advice that people ought to pay their bills and keep out of debt.  With only a few hours notice the Federal Re.serve board put Into effect la.st midnight rules governing the credit purchase of nearly every household item except food, drugs and cosmetics.  Intended si)eciflcally to give force to the suggestion made by the president last week about getting out of debt, the rules were designed to keep people from usin/i their credit to bid up prices that enter Into tlu cost of living and also to put more money into circulation for war bonds.  They provide spec:lflcally how anrt  bought on regular charge accotmts or on the Installment plan.  It was the first time that ordinary charge accounts were touched by lx)ard regulations. If an Item on the restricted list 1« charged. It must be paid for by the tenth day of the second month after the purchase, or the customer's credit must be shut oft on all listed articles The jienalty may be avoided, however, if the merchant and customer are willing to sign an agreement to rlrHn up the debt In nxtd Installments during the following six months  Installment Credit  As to installment credit, the new requirements are for larger down-payments and shorttr time to pay the balance. On most Item», the rule  (■r A»Mi>ir<i rraui  NEW DELHI. Indiii, May fi, For-tv Japanese plnnes were destroyed and 25 others badly damaged by a heavy United States l>omber squadron which strtifk early in Us second successive raid on Mlngaladon airdrome just noith of Rangoon, American sources said today.  Three flights of Major Gen. Lewis H. Brereton's bomber force In India delivered the attar,k this naornlng, starting l^res that could be seen 70 miles away.  Their bombs smashed Into the fire-blackened Japanese hangar and gasolhie dump, left wrecked by the two previous flights of bombers the night before.  The raid was the seventh In the lower Burma area since American  filers began their aerial offensive from India April 1.  Blasts Barges The RAF, timing its blows with the American attack, struck anew at barges bringing Japane.se war material and perhaps troops up the Chlndwln river on the Burma front 20Q mllcB to the northa •  The Americans met strong antiaircraft and fighter plane opposition, a U 8. army air force headquarters communique said, intimating that Mlngaladon was perhaps the chief of all the Japanese air ba.'es In Burma.  While the weary British land forces continued a rear-guard action alona the Chlndwln, aided by (Continued on Page Nine)  "na  Allies Pound Jap Bases  ^^^ aSèSì  when credit customers should pav | is one-third down and a year to  for everytliing from kitchen pans to clothing—46 Item« in all—whether  pay, except that the monthly pay-(Contlnued on Page Nine)  the whole car taken.  HANBONE'S MEDITATIONS  By AlUy  W'£Ñ Ml De TI Arts ölts wo' our vtH's A Mexp O' FOUKS óWiNE ólf '(ÍÜAINTEI)  WfP OBH FAMBties  AÄ'IM '.!  The Forrest c/)unty campaign for $6000 for the use sustaining fund will begin actively May 18, W. A. Thomson, county chairman, said today.  The national campaign Is scheduled to start May 11 but local organizations may choose a date moit suitable to them.  D. P. Cameron of Hattiesburg l.s chairman of a district composed of Forreirt, Lamar, Ore«ne, Perry and Jefferson Davis counties.  Mississippi's quota in the USD campaign is $120,000. The national goal is $32,000,000.  Ell|s Wright of Jackson is sUte chairmaii.  Highway 11 Bridge Project Status  The Washington bureau of the A.'isoclated Press Informed The Ha?-tie.sburg American today as follow; concerning the Leaf river Highwa' 11 bridge project:  "Congressman CoUner says he na been informed by the U. 8. Piibli' Roads administration that Disi.'ur Engineer C.'D. Sneed of Montgomery, Ala,, was instructed on Apni 28 to proceed with {^ans for 'on-itruction ot tiie Leaf River bririt;'^ Colmer said Sneed either has would ask the Mlaaisstppi Higl » v department for the brt^e pU^i »000 since the War Departrnf:.' has certified the structui^' as es^seu-'0*1 to the war prograu."  ■omettane mgo it vm iMmed that the brldfe project, wtB »mount to about tTOjOQO tMt to far no deuiis  of construction or location of thr Highway 11 bridge have been announced.  The present bridge was damaged ■ n January when a truck wrecked ome of the suspension trusses Aft-«»r being closed for repairs the bridge was re-opened as a one-wvy traffic lane  This week the bridge was damaged again wh<*h a trailer-truck rern into the end of one of the side railings and walkway built when thr brlf"/?» was narrowed.  People who use the .bridge ha\f been fuming for several month' over Its condition.  The American has been endeavoring to find out about the ne* bridge plan« and will aak Engineer Sneed of Monttomery for some of the detMlft,  On The Up & Up  Forrest county folk caught up some of the slack in their May quota Tuesday when they bought war bonds and stamps of a total cash value of  $5551.25.  The daily sales average necessary to meet the May quota of $119,900 is  $4612.  To4al sales for the first four business days in May amount to  $16,384.75.  Amount of deficiency for first four businets days  in May:  $2063.25.  This i"< a reduction of the deficiency by almost $1000.  Put your money to work. Maybe you can't fo to the fighting front« but the war bonds you will asm those who can.  I announced In Canberra the  ipolnt-eorge of thb Jones flying  I By AiiMt«ial»4 rrr»)  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Australia, May 6. - Allied bombers smashed anew yesterday at Japanese bases above Australia in the steady effort to keep the enerjjjf from building up offensive strefi^^h, Allied headquarters announced today, with attacks on Lae, New Guinea, and Rabaul, New Britain.  At Lae. where the raid was the sixth In ten days, the war bulletin said hits were scored on grounded enemy bombers.  The attack on Rabaul was the' he was leading a force of Kltty-thlrd in four days but headquarters Hawk fighters when a superior  Japanme force of eight bombers and  ment of Air Commodore Jones, 4«, as chief of air staf Royal Austrlallan Air force, served In the Australian corps In the last war.  The Australian Air department at the same time disclosed the death last month In a'New Oulnea air battle of one of the RAAF's most distinguished fighter pilots, Squadron Leader J. P. Jackson. An Air department bulletin said  1  •/I  -I  only said that "hits were observed In the target area " Prime Minister John W. Curtln  12 fighters was encountered and (OonUnued on Page Nlne>  Where The China Relief Money Goes  Prof. Dewey I>«rman, Forrest county chairman of the campaign for $2.000 for the United China Relief fund explained today how the money is u.sed and where It goes.  The fund Is distributed to nine agencies formerly conducting separate drives.  They are: '  American Bureau for Medical Aid to China.  American Committee for Chlne.se War Orphans.  American Friends .Service mittee  Associated Boards for Chriitlan College.? In China.  China Aid Council  China Emergency Relief Co«u&it-¡tef.  mài  China Committee for China Relief,  Indusco I American Committee in Aid of Chinese Industrial Cooperatives».  World Student Service Fund. GlfU to United China Relief are recognised by the federal and the state governments as deductible in romputinf income taxes, Mr. Dear-man said, and he defined the purpose of the organization as being four fold.  I 1 To seci^e funds for relief and Com -! I el mbllitatidn in China.  2 To rVMBure the , Chinese people of American fiiehdship and good-wUI.  3, To Mduaint the American peo> pie with nature and signlf« (OontlniiMI on Pact Mine)  fleers and men la » final of ''loytity, devotani and good to their country, their famillM mat, Mielr friends." Captain HMftI mks the commander of nav^ thraH -alt Corregidor and Colonel Samuel U Howard, SI. was the senior dAknr of Marine Corps penom^ thil«.  A communique s^d thai ^ 'H the last mesMges received froui Xiki^ tenant General Jonathan M. Watli« wrlght before Oie fall of OOfnigi-dor reported that caaualUai tftritefenawr' last few day«, and the pounding of the enemy tctiittM 111 severe damage to mültory tlons.  For the fourth conaaputlv« there were 13 aeparate air 00 Corregidor on May.^^. wrlght reported, but the ' Japanese 240 milimeter alege was more disastrous than tht acaaL i bombardment. The final uUHIßtr barrage destroyed tanglements aiKt gun installation» and other of resistance, Walnwright salf^ jp^ the Japanese brought their ««iHlt troops across the narrow •tfttdk ei water from Bataan peninaula Itt i large number of steel bärget.  Handicapped Corregldor's guna re|dled to enemy artillery fire and shelled tniok columns In Bataan durlnc fb* UM day, Walnwright reported, toot counter-battery fire was eawwll! handicapped, as it hl^-throughout the siege of tiw HbHIIB Bay forts, by lack of aerial ottMna* tion.  Walnwright also reportMi that til* Japanese had landed relafWOMMata in the vicinity of Cotabato on the Island ot and were moving a force in stMi-barges tv tlli-^ river in Mindanao.  Near Digos. on Davao Mlndinao. where AmertcanrJ forces have dealt severe felo«» «1 enemy Installations in suddn latdl the Japanese now are bcklgliip heavy pressure against Watmndtfll'i troops, the communique aald. ]  The Japanese ar« ao«r heavy pressure against WgjtBVfltWV | troops in thesa areas. tlM ««»- J munlque said. < ^ j  The text of the communblM^ Wck -1 218 of the war, based on npe^ at- tS ceived here up to 8:30 a. m. War  "1. Philippine thea "One of the last laeaMiM' ceived from Oennral prior to the fall of C seribed t^e fighting oä fore the auccessfiU laadOat the J«4>ai(wsc.  "Enemy artUlaqr. mm. guns, ilrlnc positions, ah«]t«4 other island farts  •s?  A  day. -Our guns (Continued «á  HMtHebwÉs tnaiMtloekt praMblir   

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