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Hattiesburg American: Thursday, May 5, 1842 - Page 1

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 5, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 3300  330S h the new number of the Camp Shelby telephone exchange.  HATTIESBURG AMERICAN  HOME M» EDITION  VOL. XLVI—No. 107  *-—  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, TUESDAY, MAY f, f  1942  Associated Press and Wide World Leased Wire Rei  •JMVf!  FIGHTING ON M  Japs Drive Into China  Sweep Across Yunnan Frontier From Burma  (By Associated Press) CHUNGKING, May 5.—Japanese troops invaded China's Yunnan province today after driving up the Burma road and crossing the shallow Wanting river, 670 miles from this capital, a military spokesman said.  Bitter fighting is in progress in the area around the border town of Wanting, still in Chinese hands, the spokesman reported. The Japanese appear  ed intent upon severing communications between  the Chinese of the left flank and the British of the right—at the wild mountain approaches to India, the spokesman said.  The enemy was expected to concentrate his main effort toward capturing the strategic north Burma town of Bhamo. some 170 miles north of devastated Mandalay, to seal off an alternate terminus of the Burma road, the spokesman added. A column already Is moving north from Mandalay along the Irrawaddy river.  Chinese troops far to the south of the main battlezones at Atunggyl have started guerrilla warfare, he said, tacitly acknowledging the collapse of a sustained drive against the Japanese rear.  No Withdrawal ^  The spokesman said mere wo», id be no Chines withdrawal from Burma until the war is won.  "We must continue to reinforce our Allies in Burma, Irrespective of the difficulties," he declared.  Unoonquered after almost five years of invasion and determined, even at the lowest ebb of her fortunes, to drive the Japanese out whate^r the cost, free China "put in force a new mobilization law today to marshal all human and material resources of the country.  As the new law became effective with the exhortation of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek to the multitudes of Chinese firmly backing him to face still further adversity. Japanese aggression had reached a critical point in Burma.  By capturing Lashio the enemy had closed the Burma road and .only the outnumbered, out-gunned forces of Lieut. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell stood between them and the inland frontier of China near Kutkal, only  China or India This was columns whic British and Chinese in Burma, making that country a corridor for invasion from which they could turn eastward into China or westward ISO miles to India.  China's unllaggering determination was demonstrated, however, by the new mobiliwtion law which gives Chiang's government absolute control of all her vast manpower, water materials and . wealth, including prices and capital.  It came into force, as the gen erallsslmo noted, on this anniversary of the assumption by Sun Yat-Sen of {he presidency of the emergency republican government in 1912.  "We must prepare for prolonga tion of the war and greater difficulties in the future." Chiang de clared.  All Out Effort  "The least we can expect of our selves Is that we should not prove (Continued on Page Tetw  Allied Council  Supply Formed  <By Afaoelaled Prut)  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Australia, May 5.—Allied aircraft continued their pounding of Japanese bases on islands north of Australia yesterday with attacks on Lae. New Guinea, and Rabaul, New Britain, a communique said today.  Fires were started and planes on the ground were hit, the war bulletin said. y  The Japanese made< / another #fid Port Moresby, allied base in southeastern New Guim  - * -  e^ buj; t£e  communique said thrre was no damage.  At least eight Japanese planes were damaged in the New Guinea and New Britain operations, the bulletin said.  In the Philippines, Corregidor underwent 13 bombing attacks and the Japanese effected a new landing in Mindanao  'I'he Australian war cabinet In a meeting today in «Canberra decided on the personnel, purpose and func-<Continued qn Pare . JElwen >  ■ 7>  6 Is  Million A rmy's  Men Goal  French Resist British  British commandos, marines and infantry were reported storming the bip French naval base at Diego Suarez, Madagascar, from the rear while warships and squadrons of airplanes attacked the harbor frontallv late today after British sea-borne lorces had made a surprise landing on the island.  Bitter fighting whs reported inning for control of the 1.000-mile long island, a Vichy French possession off the coast of Kft.st Alma  Diego Suarez, one of the finest naval bases in the Indian Ocean, lies at the north end of the island, which is fourth largest in the world.  A Vichy report said the n'"eminent had announced officiallv that ¿Tie British also were using parachute troops.  French chief of government Pierre Laval announced late today lie hud received a note from President Roosevelt demanding that France should not defend Madagascar against the British.  Laval said the Vichv government regarded Mr. Roosevelt's note as ■'Inadmissible."  Nevertheless, Laval said he had told the United States Charge D'Affaires this morning that under no circumstances would France make the first move toward a rupture between France and the United States.  France's 86-year-old Chief of State Petain and Admiral Darlan. anti-British chief of French armed forces, were reported to liRVe sent, a message to the commander in chief at Madagascar urging the troop« to "resist attack and defend the honor of the French flag."  DNB, the German ney.s agency, reported that a French submarine and a tender had been sunk at Madagascar resisting the British landing. _, , ..............  Xv ite '  FrCTich resfrvists were »aid to have been called up, with order to fight, the British.  The island. 800 miles off the east coast of South Africa, commands Allied sea lanes to the Middle East. India and China. A British war ofTlce communique (Continued on Page Eleven)  German Generals Put Bee On Boss  If Russian Campaign Fails The Army Will Kick Out Nazis  (By Associated Press) _ •  LONDON, May f>. A group of Adolf Hitler's generals headed by Field Marshal Walther von Rrauchitsch was reported today to have ¿old the Fuehrer bluntly that if his 1942 campaign in Russia fails, they will try to institute for Germany an alternate plan of their own calling for "abolition of the Nazi system."  A responsible source with unusually reliable information about conditions inside Germany said  --------------------------: Hitler had accepted this  T"\ f A • WW challenge calmly and ap-  Red Armies Hammer Nazi Bases In Ukraine  y  'i if  'I  olfè of three Japanese ich had rolled back the  WASHINGTON. May 5 — The army is building up to a strength •t 6,000,000 men, Undersecretary of War Patterson disclosed today in testify la? for the continuance of war department powers to commission civilians as army officers.  Patterson pleaded with the house military committee not to "sabotage the whole effort by putting us in a strait-Jacket," through rigid restrictions on commissioning.  Previously it had been announced that the goal for this year was an army of 3,600,000 men. When the 6,000,000 figure could be attained was not disclosed.  Representative Ffcddis, Democrat of Pennsylvania, sponsor of one amendment, told Patterson he was willing to modify the proposal "in any way that will make it workable." As originally approved, the amendment would permit the issuance of army commissions only to graduates of recognized military training schools, enlisted men who have completed a course In officers' training school, or men who have I rers. Mastiffs and Bulldogs held commissions In the national I crosses between them.'  guard, the reserve officers training corps, or in the World War.  Patterson told the committee it was necessary that the army be allowed to take advantage of the skill of civilians regardless of their military experience. Had it not been able to do so in the past, he said, the supply and distribution program "would have utterly broken down."  He explained that the present policy of tne army in issuing commissions to oflicers in combat branches and other branches involving strict military functions" was to take men only from the ranks who had graduated from oflicers training schools  --o--  WANT MORE DOG8 (Hy ¿««oelatM Prra;  LONDON, May 5.—The government is calling for more dogs for war service—to guard airdromes and factories and to carry messages.  It asked dog owners to lend their pets to the government for the duration, expressing particular interest  in Alsatian*. Airedales, Collies, Ter- ] " ' - •• ■ ■  or   (By Associated Press) Marshal Semeon Timoshenko's Red armies were reported hammering at three key German bases in the Ukraine today, attacking in the vicinities of Kursk, Kharkov and Taganrog, while in the north the defenders of Leningrad strove desperately to break the Nazi siege ring.  Timoshenko's huge-scale assaults on a 300-mile front, ranging from the Sea of Azov half way to Moscow, coincided with a special message he sent jves^frdi%to residents of * - -■ —  the" (jerman - occupied Ukraine:  "The Red army is on its way to liberate you."  Adolf Hitler's field headquarters asserted that the Nazis had beaten off attacks by "strong enemy forces" and declared that "several offensive (Continued ®n Page Eleven)  Price Celling Conference In Jackson Friday  Bulletins  (By Associated Press)  Price ceiling orders will be discussed at a statewide meeting of Mississippi retailers, wholesalers and manufacturers at the Heidelberg hotel in Jackson at 10 a. ni. Friday, A. C Ramsey, manager of the Hat-tiesburg Chamber of Commerce, announced today.  The meeting has been called by the Jackson Chamber of Commerce at the request of the Office of Price Administration. The OPA has asked that dealers and manufacturer:; meet in statewide session for a dis  cussion of price ceiling orders which go into effect May 11 and May 18. The May 11 orders will affect wholesalers while those going into effect later will affect retailers.  In calling the meeting. Manager W. W. Black of the Jackson chamber said:  "We are finding that retailers, wholesalers, manufacturers and others have many questions they would like to have answered, x x x In the belief that you have business men (Continued on Page Ten»  GERMAN CONVOY ATTACKED BERLIN, May 5 —An attack by British motor torpedo boats on a German convoy at the entrance to the English channel 'vas beaten off, the German high command announced today.  ALEXANDRIA BOMBED  ROME, May 5.—Axis planes bombed port installations and railway at Alexandria overnight, the Italian high command reported today.  It said one German plane destroyed a iour-engined  >Ii  59 Inductees Off To The War  HAMBONE'S MEDITATIONS  i jr AU«y  NAWSUH! ¿AJM' Ê&'rt  pe wextHUrt po  If PllkSt WlDOOT  áirtiri' talked  ER-BOUT«! £  A croird lined thfc streets of Hat-tiesburg today to witness the parade for selective service men on their way to Camp 8helby.  The procession, led by American Legion and the high school band, with Nathan PairchlW a* marshal, was preceded by a brief ceremony In the office of draft board number 1 in the Carter building.  Fifty-five Hattiesburg men and four transferred to this board horn other parts of the country were in the group. Five Hattiesburg men who were in this quota had already enlisted or were transferred to other boards.  Grasp Ln4cr  William Henry Mcintosh, jr . »»  made leader of the men and Geor; Eaton Edmonson. Jr., wat name his assistant for the trip.  E. J. Ourrle, chairman of the district draft appeal board and a veteran of the last war. was Introduced by Herman Katz. chairman of draft board number 1. Mr. Currie told the men their work might not be easy and the pay not to their likirfg, but that they would learn to appreciate character and intellect and would find that one does not have to have money to possess such qualities.  In speaking of his own service, he said. "I feel that I made a down payment on mv right to be an American citizen."  Dr. W. H. Mcintosh, pastor of the (Continued on Page Tent  USO Budget $6,000  In Forrest County  plane of an American type, while in Cirenaica Italian planes shot down two British spitfires and anti-aircraft shot down one British plane participating in a raid on Bengasi.  RAF Smears Nazi War Plants  \ 12 day drive to obtain Forrest county « share of the current IJSO war fund campaign will be launched in Hattiesburg Monday. May 11 D. P. Cameron is district campaign chairman.  During the campaign. Forrest countians will be asked to subscribe >8,000—this county's share of the $120.000 quota set for Mississippi in  the drive to obtain $32,000,000 throughout the nation.  Other south Mississippi counties embraced In Mr. Cameron's district are Lamar, iireene, Perry and Jrfi Davis Mr. Cameron will direct the district drive, while W. A. Thomson of Hattiesburg will be In charge of the Forrest county campaign. Other • Continued on Page Ten)  Two Hattiesburg Boys On Navy Casualty List  Two Hattiesburg boys i  w  Davenport, jr.. and John Burim: j ntory was: Dial, are on the Navy's first < a  1  '.'y list announced Monday after::mn.  Neat of kin are: J. W. Daw:port. sr., 130 North Twentieth avenue; and C. C. DUO, 146] River avenue.  Davenport was a fireman, first class and Dial mm • seaman, first  One other casualty from this »rr-  Burnis L. Bond, Wiggins. He a corporal in the Marines. Hu next of kin is his mother, Mrs. Ellen 8. Bond of 1  Wiggins.  Details of how they met death were not announord.  War Bond Report  Forrest county is fast falling behind its war bond and stamp quota for the month of May.  Total sales Monday, May 4:  $3931.75.  Total sales for May 1, 2 and 4:  $10,833.50.  Forrest county's May quota is $119,900. Dftily sales average necessary to meet quota is $4612.  Amount of deficiency for first three business days in May:  $3,002.50.  This is Forrest county's war as much as It is Hinds county's war or Lamar county's war or Jones county's war  Forrest county is 28 per cent behind iti quota in three days.  What a record!  iKf Si»»1>tf< PrM*>  LONDON, May 5. — Long-range RAF bombers struck in force last night at fituttlg^rt, a major manufacturing City ot southwest Germain', the Skoda armament works at Pilsen in Nazi-occupleri Czechoslovakia and the docks of Nantes on missions which cost three planes, the British air ministry announced today.  A detachment of Ktlrlings, heavy 4-motored craft, was assigned the 1,400-inile rdhnd trip to attack the Skoda works, which were blasted and fired by British airmen on a previous visit last Nov, 20  The ah ministry communique gave no details of the indicated results of the new raids.  'Aircraft of the fighter command attacked enemy air fields in France." It said, 'Coastal command aircraft attacked shipping off the coast of  Holland and Norway and bombed the Mandal (Norway* airdrome."  Big Guns Fire  British long-range nuns, apparently shelling a Nazi convoy in Dover strait or French shore objectives, fired spasmodically over one and a half hours early today. Their mighty flashes illuminated the English coast. RAF planes, perhaps on reconnaissance, were heard crossing the channel at the same time.  The fresh aerial blow at Oermany was another in a new series started Sunday hlght after weather conditions had restricted bombing opera tions for 72 hours.  Stuttgart )» an tmportant manufacturing city of about 500,000 population In southwestern Oermany which contributes machinery, electrical equipment and textiles to the • Continued On Page Ten»  pointed von Brauchitsch  a member of the supreme Command.  Hitler relieved Von Brauchitsch as commander in chief last Dec. 21 and announced that he himself, relying on his "intuition," had assumed direct command of his armies.  The source said the Incident might be interpreted in two ways:  1. That Hitler was confident of victory but needed the help of his former commander-in-chief and Von Brauchltsch's friends and hoMtf his appointment would win over critics; or  2. That he was beginning 1b recognize his weakness and Was seeking compromises.  Von Brauchitsch was one of the strongest opponents of Hitler's p(lA for holding'the forward posit Russia through the winter counselled a fall back from Ifosawr long before Hifler agreed.  Von brauchitsch was Aid to have the confidence and backfttg of stub Important military lead« as flSM Marshal Fedor Von Bock. Col Oen. Fr*nz Haider and meld Marsh*! Oen. Karl Rudolf Gejrd Von Rund-stedt, recently appointed comman-der of the German and occupied, coasts of Europe. - :  All three were reported distrustful of Hitler's "intuition" generalship and his extension of greater powers to the gestapo, with which the army frequently has clashed.  There was no hint In the inform*-tion reaching London whether Von Brauchitsch clique Hitler with displacement or him some kind of chancellorship Ha the new order they would institute If his plans failed, the source sakfc *  The informant added that he W- | lleved the dissident generals want to turn the ctunpaign tisi* where, rather than to Russia, and tt halt offetylve warfare and seek. hold Oeratany's gain by rtsfsnrtwi fighting. The clique might mQ» strive—by the removal of Hftlerlm to gain a negotiated peace to Germany, the source said. , T»^  The informant said there ha« taip! hints of some kind of Ge* tlcal friction involving marshal Hermann Wilhelm Qoef* lng.  GERMANS MORE GftIM ■ —J  1  *3  Ration Book Registration  LONDON. May 5w—A Zurttli patch to Exchange' Telegraph" today Adolf Hitler's VoeUclseh«* Btobachter tad called opoQ many's war Industry for production in a last gigantic gle and the tone of Nasi ment was more and  "Victory will only toe7>Msit&' war industry supports thS" troops by increased  straining every effort »ad _______  all our force into a last gtgMtfctif struggle." the dispatch sttkL  What is decisive in tbto WAT not only the quality or f^irafl^U*« also the quantity of war matwIS^ and muntlons of all kinds." . ^ The BerUner BoersenseltUPf wttti quoted: ' 1  "The war has developed tat» Ht real total war. Private life no too®-^ er exists In Germany. This war mands ever-growing sacrifices , Alt blood and health."  o-  Civilians went to all elementary schools today to register for their first war ration book. In some cases people stood In line for a time, but general y speaking they did not have to wait long The schoo's will be open until 8 o'clock tonight and also from 8 a m. to 8 p. m. Wednesday and Thursday.  First reports showed that about 7.WK) persons registered Monday, the ! first day for registration. I The rationing board office fojcp  1  answered countless inquiries from ; puizled citizens, some of whom tried ' to get their ration application blanks  !  at that office The forma are not ; available there. They (QUSt be secured from the schools. -I A complete set of rules govern  ing rationing procedure was received at the office only today.  Use of the sumps was explained as follows:  "Consumer« who register in the elementary schools throughout the COM try on May 4, S, « and 7 will be Able to purchase one pound of sugar with each on« of the first foar stamps In their war ration books.  "Stamps number on« will b« valid during the period of May 5 to li Stamp number two will be valid daring the period of May 11 to May M. Stamp number three will baeffacUv« from May 31 an til Jaae 1| Censwnera-win be «Me to Me stamp mmber four for par« iQnnUnuwa uo **a«e Ten/  Formt county I top 1» the Navy campaign The covaty» *eota m Desmead Klag, campaign in fh* tending ttsrti to ihe contributed to the  TIÄ  • WIATM»  Mississippi; change tonigli.  IdOCAL  éumSS^H   

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