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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 4, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 WEATHER  . MissiMippi: Srmtlered thundtr-Rhowers this «ftirnoon and tonight In south «nd central portions with rooW in Interior  HATTIESBURQ AMERICAN  HOMEMDf EDitlOR  VOL. XLVI-No. 106  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, MONDAY, MAV 4, 1942  ^ociated Press and Wide World Leased Wire Reporf  DOUBLE  Nazis Claim Sea Victory  Batter British Convoy In Running Battle  Bulletins  (By Associated Pre«) FRENCH EXECUTIONS NEW YORK, May 4 —Fifty-five Fronch hostages have been executed in Lille, Franco, by the German occupation forces, according to adviccs reaching New York. Details were not disclosed.  The latest executions raised to at least 777 the number of Frenchmen known to have been ordered killed in the several months that the Germans have been sending hostages before tinng squads m reprisal for attacks said last month, is far from complete.  \ ■ -J'  Up  Burma  GERMAN CLAIMS  i BERLIN, May 4 —The Germans destroyed 791 Russian planes and 508 British planes during April, a Berlin announcement said today.  British plane lo.sse.s in tlic we.stern front were put at 103 between April 20 and May 2  (Coiilinurd on PRk'P F.lrfrni  ♦ (By Associated Press) i  BERLIN, May 4.—The German high command told today of a furiou.s running naval battle above, below and on the bleak Arctic waters in which Nazi forces were credited with sinking a 10,000-ton British cruiser and si.x convoyed ships totaling 37,5Q9r tons.  Several destroyers and four other supply ships were reported damaged by German destroyers, submarines and bombers. One Nazi destroyer "suf-, damage"'^  fered serious and five planes were reported lost.  More than one Allied convoy wa.i involved in the battle which lasted for days. <The .ship.s apparently wer« bound for the Russian supply port of Murmansk, or possibly Archangel. through which United States and Britiiih war materials have been moving.)  "In the Arctic ocean, enemy convoys which were guarded by strong fighting units were attacked by our surface and undersea craft in stormy weather and heavy seas," the high command said.  The air force was credited with sinlcing three merchant ships and damaging a fourth.  The Germans said two enemy sWps were damaged by bombs off tn^bleak coast of Norway.  i RUSSIAN FRONT  MOSCOW. May 4.—Another 2,000 ^ConUnued on Page Nine)  Briefs  British Bomb LeHavre Area  LONDON, May 4.—RAF bombers and fighter planes made a successful sweep over the LeHavre area of northern France today after a punishing night raid on Hamburg, British authorities announced. "This morning squadrons of our  Start Issuance Of Ration Books  The first war ration books wnc, Rp.siclctit.'^ of the city living we.st of i.ssued today in Forrest county. The Twetity-secoiid avenue and tho.se registration will rotitinue Tuc.sdny. in the Monte Vista and Plnecre.st  Wednesday. Thursday and Friday between 8 a. m. and 8 p. in. nt. ail schools.  School patron.s are doinc the «nrk until after cla.<;.s hours today, Wrd-ne.sday and Thur.sday, hiit Tuesday all school.s will be dismissed for tlie whole day so "that the tz-achers may  snbdivi.sions. will renlster at the Missis.sippi Bodthern college demon-stratinii .school. Camp Shelby has it,«; own setup.  Many persons are going to tlie co\intry rationing board office to try to Ret their registration blanks.  Invasion Threat To India Developing Fast  (By Associated Press The Japanese campaign in Burma developed swiftly tbday into a stark invasion threat to China from the south and India from the east as the enemy pushed China's expeditionary army to within 30 miles of the Yunnan frontier and forced the battered British troops back to less than 150 miles from the Bengal border.  A Chinese communicjue said fighting raged 60 miles north of Lashio  ------------Vwith the Japanese driv-  f T r f f^ • ing fiercely toward Chi-  Watch, tor Drive po' tio"' n««"-On Port Moresby  help. It is hoped that the Rieale.st' Noni- is beir.R is.swd by that office, number will regi.ster on Tuesdav. i All citizens must go to the schools, Mo.st citizens are to go to their! Watts t&irnrumpf. rationing jK-aie.st elenientai v fiool to regi.s- i hoard rhnlrman, rxplained.  Commercial visers and sugar deal-  "All oi)r bombers returned safely from this operation, but three of our JiKhter.'i are inissinft."  The dav raiders crossed over tlir ; ter. There are a few exceptions to channel at .such a height ground 1 Ihis rule. Faculty members and ^ „ students of Mi.ssissippi So>ilhern  fighters escorted a small formation | ^ tration building of that .school.' rationhig office,  of Boston bombers which attacked period.  era who failed to register in April cannot do .so now, hut must wait until new forms arrive at the  objeciives at Le Havre," the announcement said.  "Enemy fighters attempted to interfere and five of them were destroyed by our fighters, which also shot down a German bomber they encountered.  German night bombers retaliated for the Hamburg attack with a heavy | as.sault on Exeter, in southwestern England, but Britain's night sharp-. shooters downed five German planes over Britain and two others over (Continued on Page Eleven)  Whereabouts Of Escaped French General Uncertain  (BT AuocUM Pm»  VICHY. May 4.—The whereabouts of General Henri Honore Oiraud, who escaped from a German prison LONDON, May 4. — Di.spatches ] ^nd fled through Switzerland to  BRIEF-GUARD QUISLING CLOSER  from Stockholm said today that the bodyguards of Vldkun Quisling, Natl puppet premier of Occupied Norway, had been replaced by specially German - trained Norwegian police "of a fair Germanic type" and that the grounds around Quisling's residence now bristle with anti-aircraft guns.  The original bodyguards were said to have been dismissed because they "were not selected with sufficient care" and because "certain Incidents occurred."  FIRE IN BELGIUM  LONDON, May 4.—A large fire broke out during the week-end near the Eisdenf station in the Limburg mining district of Belgium and spread rapidly in the direction of Asch and Mechelen on the Meuse river, the Independent Belgian news agency reported today.  unoccupied France, was uncertain today but official sources denied he had been turned over to German military authorities.  (A Reuters dispatch Trom Bern, Switzerland, said the general wa.s reported visiting with relatives at Lyon, In unoccupied France.)  Commenting on reports current durlng^ the week end concerning the general's fate, these sources said:  "As a result of erroneous indications. rumors circulated with Insistence that he had been handed over to German military authorities  at Moulins. Information from official sources formally denies thi."! news and sutes that General Glraud is still in unoccupied Prance."  Reports which The Associated Press received Saturday night from reliable European Informants said Glraud. hfero of two wars, was in custody near Vichy while the French and Germans argued over whether he should be returned to  ★ ★ * ★  Tuesday The Best Day To Register  An appeal to the citi/ens of Hat-tiesburg to register ior llieir war ration books either today or Tiie.«;-day was i.s.sued today hy Supt S. H Blair of the city .schools. Tlie .schools will be open until fl o'clock tonight, and tomorrow all classes will Im-dismissed .so that the teaciicrs can de-  home to parents to' speed the task. Tlie slip.-* do not take the place of appllcatloiH blanks; they are merely to inform the parent what will be necdfd. All must go to tlie sehool.% to register. Heads of families must have the full name, height In feet and inches, weight, color of hali.  (»7 AttnrlBl«« i'rVHt  ALLIF.D HKADQUARTERvS. Australia, May 4 " The United Natlon.s kept sharp watch today agaln.st a possible .Japanese overland snia.sh on Port Moresby after enemy forces again penetrated the Markham valley ol New Guinea. ' 'hie Japane.se traveled 27 miles up the valley iioni I.ae to Nadz.ab but later retired to positions around Lae.  Ian FItchett. official Australian war correspondent, reporting from an advanced allied base, suggested today the move was merely for re-connals.sance.  The Japanese may attempt to get advanced airfields on the southeast tongue of the Island above Australia  , or may try eventuaily to push I througii the formidable mountains separating their north coast ba.se.i at Lae, Salnmaua and Flnschafen from Port Moresby on the south coast.  Air Actlvitie« i  That the allies were taking no; chances of a Japanese threat to, their vital defense outpost either Iw land or by combined lan^-sea M-tack was evident, however, from the scope ot their week-end air activities.  On the defensive, a communique said today, they bagged three Japanese bombers and one fighter from a formation of 12 enemy bombing planeji and eight Zero fighters 8un-(Continued on Page Eleven)  vote the whole day to registering ! color of eyes, age and sex of every  an estimated 20,000 persons in the city. The hours will be from 8 a. m. to 8 p. m.  "If the people put off registerinfi until Wedne.sday or Tliursrlay they may have to wait in line for a long time." Superintendent Blair said. "We hope we can register from 60 to 80 per cent of the people Tues-  the Nazis. The.se advices, however. said nothing about his having been oav-turned over to the Germans ati School patrons are assisting the Moulins i teachers so that the work can be  In Londdn. free French sources | done more rapidlv. More than 5,000 expressed belief that fear of en- mimeographed slips containing the  (Continued o" Page Nine)  m, JAPS ORDER IRANIAN OUT  ^ TOKYO, May 4 —The Iranian minister to Tokyo was ordered today to leave Japan,  Iran severed diplomatic relations (ConUnued on Page Nine)  Dud Explodes; Three Soldiers In Hospital  questions which are asked in the application blanks, have been .sent  member of the family, and the total amount on hand of white and brown .suKar in any form. Tliere is a $10,000 maximum flne for ^Iscep-re.sental ion. . _ '  Re.nflsti wnts are to go to the elementary school nearest their residences. 'nie senior high school bulldin!<s also will be open, as Junior hlgii, which Is counted as an elementary school, Is located there.  White city schools to be open Include: Camp, Davis, Eaton, Lamar. Walthall and senior high. Colored ritv school to be open; Eureka, Third Ward and Sixteenth Section.  U.S.  Raid  Bombers Rangoon  (Hy A»)irlatril Prr««t  NEW DELHI. May 4.-Unlted States Army bombers attacked docks at Japanese - conquered Rangoon last night, a communique aimounced today. Fires were started by their explosives.  The communique follows:  "Docks at Rangoon were attacked by bombers of the U. B. Air Corps last night.  "A number of heavy bombs were dropped on the Urget.  Kutkal, ?ast main station on the Burma road short of China.  Another attack in which the Japanese attempted to fUnk th* Chinese position was reported repulsed.  The fire-blackened ruins of Man« dali^y^ln the center of * Japenew wedge l)p the broad Irrawaady ley separated the Allied deictue  forces.  A British mlllUry commentator described the Japanese thrust US, the severed Burma road towatit Chungking, 700 miles to the northeast. as the heaviest asMUK «1 campaign. He said the stowing the flow of supplies to Oblna tbHf» the tall of Rangoon appann^ JM sapped the strength of the OhtiitM army. •  A Chinese spoiafennati^nai«iNÌ» however, that the withdrawal mm made because of "stratéglfl Mi|>' slderaUan.<( ' and pledged that tM Chinese troops would win b^t Mandalay.  The BriUsh forces which With-[drew to the west to bar the ! to India were reported holding «Ut ; arn\ind Monywa on the OdhdWte river, 60 miles west ot MandAlar.'-  Dispatches from the front tiM èt sharp fighting at Kw^ehleh, W miles north of Lashio, artiere the railway from Rangoon conneeta iftth the tortuous highway over irhkli war materials were fioertNC inla.. China only a few weeka HO.  has been fairly  "One caused a large explosion and fire re-syUJed In the middle of the dock a  "En exten  "A ' numbeF of enemy aircraft bombed Akyab town and attacked shipping there. Full details of damage are not now available but It Is believed to be slight."  Akyab Is on the west coast of Burma only 300 miles airline southeast of Calcutta.  ' Three 38th division soldiers, all from Kentucky, arc in the base hospiUl for treatment of Injuries thev suffered Saturday afternoon when a .37 millimeter shell they found on the artillery range exploded after one of them loaded it  Move To Ban ^Quickie' Commissions Opposed  (Ww »•  rraM)  May 4.—Paced  WASHINOTON, with a growing shortage of olTicer.s | for the bur.jeoning army, the war , perlence. department was reported today to be bringing heavy pressure to bear against legUlatlon that would halt the Issuance of "quickie" commis-idons to civilians.  The proposal was slated to go t>e-fore the house on Wednesday in the form of an amendment by Rep Faddis, Democrat of pertpsylvania. to a senate-approved bill doubling the $21 monthly pay of army "b<»ck ' privates and granting increases to other ratings up to and including second lieutenants. One member of the senate mill-  on a weapons carrier. The injured are listed as follows' PFC John B. Bell. RFD Two. Cynthiana. Ky., Co. H, 149th In-! fantry; left arm amputated between Wrist and elbow. ,  PFC Howard 8. Creasy. Bar- • bourvllle. Ky., Co. C, 149th Infantry. Hearing and hands injured.  PFC Aubrey Wiggins. Mt. Olivet, I Ky.. 06. H. 149th Infantry. Abdominal and hand injuries.  PFC Alfred Green. Wlngo. Ky.. Headquarters company, 149th Infantry, Hand Injury but not detained In hosp'ltal.  "ihe soldiers found the unex-ploded sliell and one of them picked It up, dropped It on the ground and then loaded it on the tall gate of a weapons carrier.  __The shell exploded, hurling one  The senator said, however, that „f the men a distance of seventeen he was convinced that such in- ! (pet.  had been given to men who lackcd the necessary qualifications and ex-  stances were exceptional, adding: there was no doubt that the army ! needed aH of the ofTlcers It could (ConUnued on Page Eleven)  Not since 1937 had a dyd explosion Injured a man in the 3«th division. During maneuvers that <Cont)nued on Page Eleven)  War Bond Quota Report  Forrest county's war bond and stamp sales report for Saturday May 2:  Total .sales:  $3059,25.  Total for May 1 and May 2:  $6901.75.  Daily average of $4612 is necessary to meet Forrest county's May quota of $119,900.  Amount of deficiency for first two days of May:  $2322.25.  Help your county equal or exceed its quota by buying more war bonds and stamps!  Chinese Relief Campaign Begins  The presence of Japanese tvoopi at Kweichleh reported - a » mile advance in about 41 houn, Adnlt Manaalay't IM  News of the Japaneee advaoM 19 the Burma road was accaMpanted  by an official announoanenl thift Chinese forces had wltbdiMm 9M-day from bomb-seancd Mandah». the one-time Burmese capital about' 135 miles southwest of lashtn.  (The Japanese announced Satur^ day that their trot^M had ooeu|iled Mandalay the day previous and M-ported they had found ths tttwn * charred, smoking mass o^ nitea.)  The Chinese declared 'th^jr wn still holding Taunggyl, which Ja  The campaign )n Ml.wd.s.slppl Is being directed, by O. B. Taylor of Jackson. W, M. Mounger of Jackson is state chairman and F W. Foole. president of the First National bank of Hattlesburg. Is one of the sUte vice chairmen.  The campaign for Chinese relief I fund.s began today and Forre.st roiintv {)eot)J« are being asked Ui contribute $2,000.  The national goal Is »7.000,000. The Mississippi state toul Is $35,000.  Prof. E>ewey Dearman of Mlssls-slpppl Southern college is Forrest county chairman. He Is being asslst-^ ed by Dr. Inei Boucher, vice chairman for Che women's division.  A. B. Cook of the Citizens bank Is county treasurer and will receive donations either In person 01 by mall.  Wendell Willkle Is honorary na-tlonal chairman of the campaign.  In an address opening the campaign Mr. Wlllkie said a year ago Soldiers who are .sending greeting i he appealed to the hearts of Ameri- i cards, letters with photos In them, i cans but that now he l.s appealing air mail and special delivery letters I to their heads. | labeled 'free ' and without putting  Chinese people who have made ' postage on them, will find that they and are making .such a determined are being returned or sent on mark-  I-  about 100 miles southeast of liHK"^ daiay. but it appeared tlwir situation there was precarious;  Japanese forces have been ed in the vicinity of Hslpaw, 40 miles below Lashio on tha 1  to Mandalay. If .^hese units «imk ceeded in Joining hands «Uh illi Japanese at Mandalay the  troops at Taunggvl vaaiAhÊJSàJKftt^^ Bemb Jape Bombers flown by Chinese pttato and escored by "Flying Tlfetnl" <âÎ (Ck>ntinued on page Wlw)  Free Mail Reminder For Shelby Soldiers  fight against the Japanese aggressors need all the help, financial and moral, that the United States citizens ran Offer.  ed "postage due " Postmastfr J Brown said today.  "A great quantity of such tnail has had to be returned," he stated, "and  Rent Rules For Landlords In This Defense Area  <mr aa  Mai riTM)  - administration explain the pro- During thi,s waitlriK period, any re- fi»d cluU  wh« ..VAd nnt to be WASHIKOTW, May 4. - Pnce cedure. based on the Maxch 1. 1942 . ductlon is up to yuur landlord or to t,„trt«-re vary condurr who ^icu uuij«. Administrator Leon Henderson ha^ da«* In the other areas the proper .slate and Iwal artion.  l^^ÄLi^i. h.H .xnrL^^^he ordered rento reduced and stabilized date should be subslltuted: Q. What will happen at the end  «I^L^Í^ríd^ln M tíTÍadíb «« Mitbin 60 daw Q- I «ve 1. one ef the defense- of 60 da,.?  SÂiîÎ^ ^ *-knmteú by Mr. A If, at th. end of SO days. Mr  îfîS«^ .H. fJîr^ Henderson and ny rent has been Henderson iindr that hU recommen-  StS^K^^fn^iZí» frSnS offwrs ' maxlmum that may be charged; increwei sioce Marèl» t, IMS. the dations for the area have not been  a!?, iST^i^îÎîï^tS ^ " maximum date wt m»Mimmm vmH 4mU whUh Mr. met. he can step in at any time and  ÍSLSS^SJ^ ^Sl^ AP^ to «^i ihe Henderswi hae Jwt leeMended , reguUte rents  * date choeen «M Jan. 1, IMi, and in f«" Bew mmi mmy I ex-1 Q. By what method will Mr. Hen-  oviiian»,^ rai^HUw ^ mnajnlijf afven ^be date was P««* a e«» nmM ■ deraen establish maximma renU?  Paddis charged that favorltlan A. Oni* the iw^ency price con- f"«"  had been shorn} in jmae instances The foOowliic «twftlon and am- trol act the federal government can a He will order wkA hUh wmdm commiirtwif  ven prqMVMl W ülOtikl oí Pnc«. oaí créa iwfg tvdoced tot to days., held to the rents in eliect on a specl- < l rereive a refniiáT  That date Is the "max-| A, No, you will receive no refund ; the landlord meet any Increase in nt date. ' As a general, But aft-er the 60-day period and hU cosU?  prii.I iple the rent for any house can after the price admini.straiion hasi A. The taw requires the admin-  1,0 nu,r. than the rent for that i^^ed reKulatlons for your area, "T'^f  hou e on the maximum-rent date.; „„^ smh relevant factors as he may de-  8,>er ml reKulatlohs Will control rents . u, ot general  in hou.ses that were hot rented on ' » »* applicability, including Increases or  the maxiinmn-rent date » monlh, and the lease Iw 11 decreases in property Uxes and  Q. Mr rent was raised fr.m f» U ^' 'T'' .  >40 a mnnth en April I. im. 8up- A. No. you wUl pay no more than i Adjustment  P„»e that Mr. HcnderM>n, after the »32 regardless of any lease, «ub- q. what hnwens to the land|«rd  ling 6«-daT waHing i«rt»d. orders rents »«'^«»•nl- ^^^  ail housing rents held at the Mareh I. 1M2 level, will obll«atlon. .itenMUent  li the hwne sImn) (fee  I Q. It reata are peited. tmt wlUi iGonttniM« Paia läne>  we would like the aoldleni to trndtr* stand Just what they may «end der the "free ' designation. A freat . many will, for example, be — Monther's Day cards betvem mm and May 10. and theee must havir stamps on tbem. even it tb«r M sealed."  Only first claas letter maO la <m the free list and enclosures «I p|e> tures. insignia or other tblii(s OMka postage nécessary. Itaiillee ot mm in th« sendee cannot sead tm mm-.:  The poital redslatloBS free m^U read asTotto««: 3. Any first-cHuw letter ter admissible to the maKi •• dtnvtjr mtt matter «Meh H by » the  naval * nmM  THf  LOCiUk Rattlesbun: and sUg^tly ooctar and toidght.  OMUPSA ers tlds >tle  1   

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