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Hattiesburg American Newspaper Archive: May 2, 1842 - Page 1

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   Hattiesburg American (Newspaper) - May 2, 1842, Hattiesburg, Mississippi                                 WEATHER  Mississippi: Litte temperature  change tonight.  VOL. XLVI—No. 105  H ATTIESBURG AMERICAN  HOMI MIB EDITION  HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1012  Associated Press and Wide World Leased Wire Report  OCCUPY  REVISE SCHOOL PROJECT  Plans Must Be Changed  Government Will Not Grant More Mongy  A drastic reduction in the size of the Hattiesburg school project will be necessitated by the inability of school officials to get more government aid, Supt. S. H. Blair announced teday upon his return from a conference with the Federal Works Agency i^ithoritiea in Atlanta. A re-advertisement for bids will take''place in about a week.  No higher priority rating than the present A-(> could be obtained; in fact the FWA men were;'  17 Killed  In Plane Crash  Bulletins  (By Associated Press)  STARK OPTIMISTIC  LONDON, May 2.—Admiral Harold R. Stark, com-! mandor of U. S. Naval forces in European waters, expressed j confidence today in his first press conference that Allied i naval strength despite losses, would rise steadily until itj overwhelms the Axis.  1  j  "This year will be a tight year," said the former commander of the U. S. fleet, "but there will come a time, when we will be in a posit ion to strike anjJ carry through j no matter what the losses." '  LIBYA  ROME, May 2.—The Italian high command declared J today that Axis'forces had forced British armored columns? to withdraw in Libyan engagements. j  There was intense artillery activity," the high command said, "our guns effectively shelling the enemy tanks and forcing them to retire." i  Port Said, Egypt, was raided by Axis planes and large j fires were reported to have broken out in the target area.! The high command said German airmen shot down three 1  spitfires in continued attacks upon Malta and other British; planes were destroyed aground. i  British airmen were reported to have damaged several houses, but caused no casualties in a raid on Axis-held Bengasi. |  surprised to learn that the project's rating is  that high.  Original plans had called for such  !  things as steel window casings. ■ These are now unavailable. 1  Just what items can be cut out of; the plans to reduce the cost of the .  • prolect sufficiently, is not yet' : known, the .superintendent said. He  CHINESE ENCIRCLE JAPS  CHUNGKING, May 2 —The main body of a Japanese invading force in south Honan province has been encircled by Chinese troops, it was reported today. The announcement said:  "According to field dispatches, the main body of the (Continued on Page Eleven)  Knock At Back  Door Of China  i' " ■  Burma Battle Borders  > \  On Major Disaster  I  (By Associated Press Rudyard Kipling's storied city of Mandalay, blackened by fire and its golden temples smashed by -Japanese bombs, was reported today to have fallen tn .Japan's invasion armies as the battle of Burma verged on another major disaster for the Allies.  A late bulletin from Chinese headquarters, however, declared that Japanese troops striking up the Burma road toward China had' been hurled back  with heavy casualties  ''I  X  TA  (By Auorlatrd Pfrii)  SALT LAKE CITY, May 2 —A \ sleeper transport ploughed into a j storm-lashed ridge within sight of I Salt LaKe City's airport late last  1  night, killing 14 passengers and a The board is expected to meet;  crew of  t,j iree   early next week. j George Benton Fearhart, watch-  The original project called for the man at an inn ori the highway about building of three new schools: aj a  mile below the site and first to junior high. West End elementary | reach the scene, said one man lived  has scheduled meetings with the architects to go over the entire project. The board of trustees will then study Mr. Blair's report and after that new bids will be asked.  for a few minutes.  All others, including -one infant, apparently were Instantly killed.  «  and a colored elementary: and the repair or seven others: senior high, Camp elementary, Walthall elementary. Jeff Davis elementary, Eaton elementary. Lamar elementary and Eureka (colored* high school.  On April 23, bids for construction and repairs were opened at'the-city hall. Cost of the project had been estimated at $438,600. of which the federal government was to supply $298,600. The city has already sold bonds for the other $185,000.  Only two bids were received and only one of these, that of Newton and Glenn, was for the whple project. The bid was $879,999, nearly j  an d the issuance of sugar rationing twice the estimated cost. j stamp books will take place between  School authorities were hopeful the hours of 1 p. m. and 6 p. m., that the government could increase j May 4, 5, and 6 Inclusive at the its grant, and seven men went to • office of Lt. Charles E. Diehl, quar-Atlanta the first of this week to'termaster rationing officer. Warehouse avenue, Building A-l, Camp Shelby.  Those persons entitled to register and receive sugar ration books air as* follows:  A. Officer« for themselves and for each dependent customarily domiciled in their household.  B. Warrant officers for themselves  ---J  1   Scars on the ground indicated the United Airlines plane struck on the edge of a shallow gully near the summit of the ridge, approximately four and one-half miles from the airpoit. destination of the east-bound San Francisco transport.  Wreckage was scattered over a wide area. Some bodies, „mangled, were thrown clear. Others lay in the debris. Bodies in the wreckage I Were charred by a gasoline-fed fire ¡that flared up as I he big liner I (Continued on Page Four)  Shelby Sugar Rationing Rules  Registration of military personnel i and for each dependant customarily  domiciled In their household.  RAF Pounds ^French Coast  "Japs Scout Australian Coast  *mi«M r*  HEADQUAR'  (By A»*nrlatr<l rrwi  LONDON. May 2.—British bombing squadrons hit in iorce at Nazi centers along t)ie French roast by twilight, yesterday and thru returned to their bases to spend n. second night aground while Nazi raiders likewise remained at home.  "The weather last night was unsuitable for large scale operations, but' aircraft of the coastal command attacked enemy shipping off the Norwegian coast and hit a.destroyer,'' the air ministry said. "Air-  northern France were aircraft of the lighter  dromes in bombed by command." ,  One coastal command plane was reported missing from the nocturnal operations.  Hundreds of planes — B o s t o n (Douglas) bombers, bomb-carrying Hurricanes and escorting fighter squadrons--struck across the English channel at Dusk against the Port of Calms, the station and railway vards at St. Omer and other (Continued on Page Eleven)  discuss the matter with the FWA, but *"ithout success.  $5,000,000" AVIATION MECHANICS SCHOOL FOR GULFP0RT  (Br AiuctaM ritM)  GULFPORt, *ffc>s.;' Mfey 2. — A United States aviation mechanics training school, casting over $5,000,-000, will be located in Gulfport, Mayor J. w. Milner announced today. He said construction on the project will be cm Monday  The school site consists of about 1.200 acres, adjacent, to the new CAA airport now being built.  --o-  HAMBONE'S MEDITATIONS  C. Enlisted men authorized to ration separately, and not receiving subsistence in kind, and for each dependent customarily domiciled in their authorized separate quarters For example, an officer who has In his household a wife, two minor children, a dependent mother, and a domestic will be entitled to an aggregate of six war ration books.  Each unit at Camp Shelby will designate one commissioned officer who will be known as unit war ration (Continued on Page Elevi  Reds Deal New Blows To Nazis  <»r  ALLIED HEAOQUARTERS. Australia, May 2.- General MarArthur's headquarters disclosed today that two suspicious warpianes which flew far down Australia's east coast over the port of Townsvllle were iircd on by nnti-aircnilt batteries yesterday while Allied airmen again were raining bombs on the enemy airdrome at Oasinatn, New Britain.  As American and Australian planes kepi, up Hieir daily assaults  on Japanese bases threatening Australia, a correspondent of the Melbourne Herald warned that the Allied airforee was facing heavy odds and urgently needed more planes, men and bombs In order to keep strategic Port Moresby, New Guinea, secuie.  The planes sighted over Towns-viile. about 700 miles below Cape York, Australia's northeasternmost area, were not identified and the (Continued on Page Four)  Navy Loses 5,486 In War  How To Use Ration Book No. 1  WASHINGTON, May 2 The Office of I»rlce Administration, on the eve of the nation's first food ration-  di Animili Pimi  KUIBYSHEV, Russia, May 2.— The Red navy's Baltic fleet has Mink its 115th Axis transport, a 9,000-ton German craft, and Soviet land and air jfprccs have further battered Adffl* Hitler's war machine, the Russians said today.  The Soviet information bureau re  ported destruction of the Nazi transport in a communique from Moscow. I Thi^ followed up a May day an-I nomici ment. that 447 German ves-' srl'-, including a battleship and a enn er. had been sent to the bottom ! of the Baltic in the effort to sever I German - Finnish communications I (Continued on Page Eleven)  I  By Alley  f  MISS Lucy SAY WEM J>EY<?UlT5 RUNNIM* CYARS ON DE ROAP 5ME âWiME GiT HER. AH'BJt PAWG !!  Kentucky Derby  (Br *hwi*M rrwi  CHuRCHILL DOWNS, Louisville, Ky . May 2 —Sun Again, owned by I Warren Wright's Calumet farm, i was scratched from the Kentucky I derby today, reducing to 15 the field i for the 68th running of the $75.000 I mile and quarter three year old turf : classic.'  j The scratching of Sun Again «s-not entirely unexpected although i< was believed this morning that Trainer Jones would make an effort to win his second straight derby for the master of Calum"! Whirlaway won tn the famous devil red and blue silks last year.  Only a short time «before Sun Again was withdrawn. E. B. Johnston of Los Angeles had scratched First Prize, one of the outsiders, thus making the first reduction in the original field of 17.  Meanwhile, the spectator* continued to pour into the Downs Thousands of sweltering people milled around the infield.  lng. emphasized today that retail grocery stores may accept either ;  sugar purchase certificates or war ration stamps as authorization for sugar sales.   1  Consumer registration under the sugar distribution plan will begin in (elementary schools throughout the 'country on Monday; actual rationed sales commence Tuesday. Some re-j tall stores, OPA explained, apparently are under the mistaken lmpres-! sion that they will be permitted to : accept ration stamps only, j Although each consumer will be , issued "War Ration Book 1," containing 28 stamp*, a number of institutional users such as restaurants and soda fountans already have re-reived sugar purchase certificates which are valid at retail stores.  In addition, individual consumer* allowed sugar for special purposes such as home canning will make up another Urge group which will present sugar purchase certificates at. retail grocery stores.'  Each of the first four stomps in the war ration books will permit a consumer to buy one pound of sugar every two weeks. The first stamp I will be good from May 5 to May 16  (  Although oo decision ha« yet been reached,-OPA officials said it was l,posaiWe the rati*» allowance may be Changed «iter June 27, when the first four X«mps will have been used » (Continued on Page Eleven;  Daily War Bond Quota Report  This is the first of a scries of daily reports on Forrest county's war bond and stamp quota sales during the month of May. * -  County quota assigned by the U. S. Treasury:  $119,900.  Sales May 1 at the postoffic e and at the two banks, all added together in cash value of bonds and stamp*:  $3842.50.  Daily average necessary to achieve Forrest county's quota, based oh 26 business days during month of May:  (By A»»i><-I»tfd I'rr»)  WASHINGTON, May 2. -The navy announced today the loss of 5.48« dead and missing in the first four months of world-wide naval warfare.  The casualty recapitulation, the first of the war, included marine and coast, guard personnel as parts af the navy and covrred the period from Dec 7 to April 15, Inclusive. It, gave this summary  Dead .....................2,991  Missing ...................2 495  Wounded ................. !»07  Total .....................fi.393  i Officials said most of the casual-tiesjtgjulted from direct action with | the eiHMTrtV but Included some lost > In accldenfc at sea, in the air, or 1  on war duly. Natural* deaths were J not included. The total may be in- i creased by late-arriving reports from distant war zones. |  The four-month total was half ! again as large as the casualty figure for the entire World War, when, some 3.500 officers and men were killed in action or lost. j  It included the Pearl Harbor in- ' eldest. The latest figures on Pearl! iContinued on Page Eleven» I  after penetrating north of Hsenwi.  Hsenwi, only 45 miles from the China border, is 22 miles northeast * of Lashio, wfych the enemy eap-tured on Wednesday to «hut off the last northern link of the Burma road.  The fall of Mandalay was «till not definitely conceded by th* British late today.  Imperial Tokyo headquarters «aid Japanese troops occupied the city yesterday, climaxing a 410-mile advance from ftapgoon since March t.  official Allied confirmation of tht-Tokyo claim was lacking, but die» patches from the Burma front y«s-terday indicated the city was setl-ouslv threatened and that the British were falling back rapidly.  Brit ish headquarters at New Delhi acknowledged that retreating British trooop« had blown up a se-." ries of bridges below the city, iiw» eluding two spans of the famous Ava bridge. 10 miles southwest of Mandalay.  North of Irrawaddy  "On the Mandalay front, all British troops are being withdrawn from the position north of the Ira-waddy," a communique said.  The Irrawaddy river forms a bit nortti-south bend immediately below the ^lty of Kipling's song, one» the glittering capital of Burmese kings.  The . British officially Japanese"* warpianes of "sys and indiscriminate bombing" tn (Continued on Page Eleven) -o-  $4612.  Sales to be reported daily for preceding business day will be only those made to citizens of Forrest county. Non-resident« who buy stamps and bonds here are counted at their own homes.  Japs Report Russian Ship Sunk By Allied Sub  Ben Stevens A Candidate  Ben Stevens of HaUiesborf,  chancellor of the tenth  f  — district, announced formally  (Br AMiwIatrd Prrai)  TOKVO. May 2. -A Tokvo source declared today the 4.7ßl-ton P.us-sian merchant ship AU'jrlstroi was torpedoed last night by a United States submarine or one of its allies i»nd left in a sinking condition-off the southwest coast of Kyushu, southernmost of the main Japanese islands.  The annou'.iceuiriit said the 2.539-ton Japanese steamer Calcutta Maru also was sunk bv a submarine yesterday Iri nearby waters.  Torpedoing of the Russian vessel.  it said, was disclosed by a Japanese merchant ship «Inch was reported to have found it last night and rescued 50 members of the crew  There has been no conflrriiatlon of this Tokyo report from any Russian or other non-Axis source  Whether true or false, of course, such a story would serve Japanese propaganda purposes not only as an attempt to provoke Russian-Amer-lcan friction but also to picture Russian ships as trading in Japanese waters.  List Names Of 64 Tuesday Inductees  Names of 60 Forrest county men and four transfers who will be inducted into the armv Tuesday were announced today by Herman Kat/, chairman of Forrest county drai't hoard No. 1« which has jurisdiction inside the city.  The induction ceremonies will take place ^t 9 o'clock at Board No. 1 offices in( the Carter building.  Dr W. H.i Mcintosh, pastor Of the First Presbyterian church in Hat-1  twsburg. and father of one of the inductees, will speak. E. J. Currie, chairman of the distrct draft appeal board, also will speak.  The program for the ceremony is being handled by the Allen Carter Post of the American Legion  M. I. Oinsburg, post adjutant, b vailing all members of the post to meet at 8:30 a. m. Tuesday at the Legion hut on Green street and (Continued on Page BeveiU  BEN BTtngti  as a candidate for congress tram tfaiv  sixth district. t  Chancellor Stevens filed  notice of his candidacy «  (Continued an ■o-  THE  LOCAL Hattiesbuif. perature change  Mississippi: Uttie ehtiflg^ toolfbU   

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