Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Delta Star, The (Newspaper) - October 9, 1937, Greenville, Mississippi                             READ THE "WANT ADS It b a profitable habit to have. Maybe you have discarded article tome- one would buy; or you arc employment VOLUME NUMBER CCLXYXI ONE DAY AHEAD" Football i First In The Star Hornets Defeat Y Campaign Totals Tupelo Wave 12-0- Are At More upeio w ave iz u, Funds Expected Monday GREENVILLE. MISSISSIPPI SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9. 1937 "Ecstacy" Here Game Unimpressive "Deal" Made rival of lhe fi il B'S Hornet for nevl LeUnd al 19 to 0; Greenwood beat Bel- if. The Greenville High school Hornets pounded out an un- impressive 12-to-O victory over the Tupelo High school Golden Wave last night, ending their fourth game of the season with- out a defeat. The Hornets gained consistent- ly, broke .-through the touted Wave line almost at will, cnm- pleted an impressive pcrcenTage of pass attempts; but failed to Both Sides Expect Battle To push over the number of touch- i c. lu downs their gains would have tn" For justified. At the end of ihe Yangtse River Vallev game, Tupelo's acrinl attack which had been launched seri- ously ia the last quarter, had put the visitors in scoring dis- tance. They had the ball on the line when the meeting Estimated Will Be TO WED_Although st.iouslv I I_J._ I _ f I -HI .._ CHINA AND JAPAN READY FOR BIG BATTLE RAINS MAY DELAY ANTICIPATED FIGHT if Assurance that the Y. M. C. A..will reach the goal set for the 1937 campaign was Riven last night by Will Mc- Candless. although complete re- sults of the drive wore not avail- able. Latest tabulation last mgM showed the total subscribed 'o be nil the rtHciepr.iicv between this figure and lhi> coal will be made up when addi'ion- i'l subscriptions come in I.Iou- dov. campaign will not bo con- tinued Monday, it was ex- plained Inst night bv Mr. Mc- but some of the work- ers asked that n few of their i-'i-cls he hold over until Monday, when it will be more convenient for them to .qct in touch with subscribers. The latest figure. arrived at by adding the S175 turned in yesterday to tin 181 total reported al yesterday mnrnilia's breakfast. Division B, headed by William Clnre Harbison and rinmscy Rus- sell won the division award and the Harbison-Russell team won thn team of two award. The awards (ollow: Division n for reporting the largest total number of subscrip- iVwas culminated. A crowd almost la'rge as .the delegation -which turned out for the Memphis Warriors' tus- sle locally last week witnessed the game, .lust night, in perfect football weather. Tho first counter eamc in (he first quarter, after Sigmi, Ostroin nnti Henderson line! dueled back ----1 t vtuticu UCIUK bnlllp of n P-- Led Into What Is Said To Be "Bloodiest Battle" By EARL LEAF Copyright, 1937, by United SHANGHAI, .Saturday, Oct. 9 (UP) China and Japan were prepared today to hurl an estimated men into the battle of the undeclared Chinese- .sy ill, Mohammed Tewfik Nessim Pasha, 64, above, thrice Premier of Egypt, has ordered plans to proceed for his wedding in Cairo to Maria Huebner. 17-year-old daughter of an Austrian inn- keeper. The couple's marriage plans recently collapsed when the girl's father objected to fi- nancial arrangements, but later he approved a new settlement. Conimncd on Page Three 6500 MINERS REFUSE TO END SYMPATHY STRIKE running James Mc- the one-man band of the visitors. Hall took the pigskin ovcfthe stripe, with a two-yard line 'plunge. It was well after the middle of the first scllo. Tupelo got the ball, after a fumble, on their Doth sides expected that a great final bnttle to end the long struggle for control of tho lower Yangtse river valley would start this week-end. General Chu Shao-Liang, Chi- nese commander, had about 44-ynrd line. Signa took the hnll on the first play, plunged through the line and twisted through Ihe backs for a sweet gain of 19 yards. Os- trom ran the next play, and it must imye been then that he found the hole in the Tupelo line. He a couple of yards off tackle. On the next play, however, he swooped around end on n long dash, with the Hornet offensive line clicking perfectly, ami ended on the Tupelo 16-yard line. He went through the line on the next try, made two yards 'and a first down, and then Hen- derson ran around end to place the ball on the nine-yard line. Ostroin then picked up six yards. with Pelczo, who later was in- jured, showing Tupelo how to block. Signa failed on his try, and then Hall made the few feet through the line. McCain was going to try for file extra point, but tr.e ball was fumbled by the holder. A few minutes after Ihe lasl quarter Began, Signa plowed through the Wave, clipped off Ifl yards, and made the second counter of the gome. The fourth began with the ball on Tupelo's -13-yard line and in their possession. McElroy (ttiis boy WTS good) picked up six yards through the line. On the next play, ho dropped back for a pass, changed his mind when Cadenhcad nnd King whizzed to- ward him and managed to twiil through for a sevnn-vnrd pain and a first down. Their pass, nnd they had a bnafull, came on the next play: McElroy to Thomas Adams to W. R Bry- ant, laterally, and the mmider here, declared formally that a fight to the death is im- pending. General Matsui, in his procla- mation, said: "The Japanese ormy now is prcoared use every means within its power lo subdue its opponents. The objectives of the Japanese expeditionary forces are lo protect the lives and prop- erty of Japanese residents, lo scourge the Chinese and its army in punishment for their actions in following delib- erate anti-foreign ami anli-Ja- policies in cnllabnralion with the Communist groups, and, in short, to establish tho founda- tions for a firm and lasting pence in East Asia. "We arc determined to subdue those who bear arms against Ja- pan. The Japanese army will show no mercy. I am confident that the day again is near when the liqht of peace will shine again." The general's declaration was he said, "carried the lu- bel 'Air Cruisers, Inc.1 As well as my own name, and descrip- tions I have received of the r.'fl sny il ca'rrird only my Callan also said the raft made for Miss Earhart carried ;i sin- gle orbon dioxide bottle, since it was of new design, wherea.1: older rafts carry two hollies. Descriptions or the raft found did not mention such bottles. :T doubt very much if tiic raft could be Miss Callan said, because of the missing Air Cruiser. Inc., t'ibf-1 and 1 don't see how it could hai-e drifted that far. I was in the navy for some years and the currents in that vicinity would have taken Ihe raft awiiv from Hawaii." Callan believed the raft, of "two-man" type, came from a pleasure boat. CHARLES WEINTRAUB BEAUT Lnmarr. 22- year-old Viennese beauty whose bathing scenes in the banned film, caused a sensa- i tion, as she arrived In York Union Leaders Demands I nored when Stay-downers' Hedy xiesicr. Refuse To Leave Mine nT Council Delays To Lay Telephone Cable Permit lo the Southern Bell Telephone Company lo lay an underground conduit from the central office on Washington ave- nue to Starling slreel was de- layed al a meeting of the City Council yesterday because of a controversial clause in the series of restrictions imposed by the council. The Ick'piionc company ob- jected to a clause calling for per- manent maintenance of poles for the city's fire alarm system. Al- though this provision is included in the company's franchise, ilwas contender! that if the city is ev- entually wired for telephone by means of underground conduits, llu: clause would impose an un- necessary burden on the com- pany. The proposed contract'will bo referred lo officials of the tele- phone company for approval or disapproval before the council takes further action. ------Read The a quarter-mile underground that they remain working. Tonight, at a meeting of com- pany officials and a gcneral'mine committee of Ihe nine valley lo- cals of Ihe United Mine Workers of America. Jesss D. Warrincr, president of the concern, assert- ed he was ready in listen lo any and all grievances.ns soon as the "illegal" strike was ended, but would not negotiate until the men return to work. A sub-committee of four mcm- hci-.s of tile union committee was named to lake U'an-iner's state- ment to flu; "slay who have been 1252 feet udergiound, on Ibe Coaldalc colliery's eighth level, since Tuesday morning. 11 considered unlikely, on Page Three Death From The Air IN PLAY IN NEW YORK c by bolh Chinese and Japanese. It means that he has abandonee! )iis Ions efforts to crack the solid walTof Generalissimo Chi- ang Kai-shek's all-China anti- front by stratapern nnd will fight with every thing he can find. The one thintj that may delay the great battle, observers be- lieved, i.s continuation of the rains of (he three whi-h have turned the marshy battle zone north and west of hai into a quagmire. Rain still Cliarlos Weintraub, who previously cmoloyerl hern at Tonka's, is a member of the Jane Manners Players, whir are pre- senting a one-act plav today at the Talk of the Town Club in New York City. Rend The. Star Weather Continual on Page Three if Mils.: Cloudy Saturday, fol- lowed by rains Saturday night Sunday. Ark.: Hain Siilurday End Sun- da V. right on down lo Greenville's 33- __ __ Cotton South Must Trade yard line. McElroy went Ihroiigl. Ihe line for a hard earned three- yard gain and another first down i T i For Desired Crop Legislation on Ihe next play, but Adams do- nalcd a ynrd on his try. McElroy then picked up the one Adams lost, added another lo it and then, on the next plav. shot a pretty pass to Ward Filqo, who emerged from under Cadcnhead, Pelezo, etcetera, etcetera on ihe 25-ynrd line. It looked bad. McElroy tried another but Osfrom (boy, he played ball last night) sprinted forward, jumped and hit the ground running with ball, the prettiest intercep- tion of the season. He scooted 30 yards to the Tupelo 45-yird line. Henderson took the pigskin on the first down (Henderson carried the ball frequently lost night, and looked good) find dashed 16 yards on a long run perfect interference aruund end. It was, of course, another first down. Oslrom picked up Cor.tinued on Past Three MONROE, La., Oct. B (UP) The Cotton Soutli will hove to do a lot of trading to get the crop legislation its farmers de- sire, U. S. Rep. Rene H. Derou- en, D.. La., warned a statewide agricultural meeting hero today. "We must be tolerant and have a bolter understanding" said Deroucn. "The small farm- er as well as the large planter must be cared for by striking a reasonable balance. "There are but 137 maximum congressional votes from the nine cotton states out of a total of 435. It is a matter of trade in order to secure-legislation such as cotton farmers require." Senior E-n. John H. Overton of Louisiana told the meeting which endorsed Agriculture Com- missioner Harry D. Wilson's leg- islative program that "the time has come when the dirt farmer rmi'i be heart! from." "The govei nmcnt today." snit! Overtoil, -h f-nm-mir.'.lcd. want- ing to develop cxpcil While we do not procure nnc- third of the nrg.ir. there has been restriction sugar production to aid cmi'ilric-i like Cuba in increasing their r.ur- chasing power of our manufac- tured goods. "If the government wanls to build up its export trade by re- stricting tl'e output of agricul- ture, let it pay adequate benr-fil.s to the farmer for the lanr] that is taken out of production." The proposals, ad- opted at a gathering similar lo others in .orm stales, will be gallons endorsed here will be given lo a Senate sub-committee at New Orleans on October 22. Urn PRICE FIVECEtiTS: Second Crop RJjgs Curb On Cottfe Gambling U.S. PREPARES Dixie Adviser FOR CONFERENCE ON SSNO-JAP WAR Preliminary Conversations With Great Britain On Procedure Are Begun ROOSEVELT, CABINET CONFER ON U.S. POLICY American League Against War, Fascism Attempts to Picket Jap Embassy WASHINGTON. Oct. B (UP) The United Stales govern- ment today plunged actively in- fo preparations for a nine-p'ower conference In slop .Japanese "ag- gression" in China when it bc- yan preliminary conversations with Great Britain on procedure to be followed among Hie con- sulting powers. The conversations bcaan with a conference between V. A. Mallet, counsellor and charge d'affairs of Hie British Embassy and Assistant Secretary of Slate Hugh Wilson, expert on League of Nations procedure. The ine-ciiiii; lollowed (lav-long discussions between President Roosevelt and his Cnbinol and foreign affairs advisers on the extent to which the United Slates will go in aiding the proposed "quarantining" of Japan as an .exponent of law- le.ssness." G rent (Britain apparently was acting on behalf of all league powers which signed the nine- power frentv guaranteeing the territorial integrity of China. Al- though the United States has yd received an invitation to Die league-sponsored conference at which an economic boycott of Ihr- island empire may be discussed. Secretary of Stale Cordell Hull has assured Europe of Amer- ican participation. Wilson declined to discuss the MaJIel called on him in response to instructions from Anthony Eden, British for- cii'n minister. While they talked, members Fort MIIIou. publisher and editor of the Chattanooga, Tenn., News ap- pointed special assistant to ad- vise Secretary of State Cordell Hull on reciprocal trade policies Continued on Page Three Confederate Vets Vote For Meeting with GAR MONTGOMERY, Ort. II (UP) A score of Alabama Cnnfodei Me veltM'.'ins. ending their state oncamomcnt, toniuhl voted unanimously for n joint convention wiMi HIP iii'my of the Republic nl Gettysburg. Pn.. in .June. 1030. General J. ft. Kennedy. Tns- caJoosa, re-c-iectcrl rnmmniiMrr. snid, liowpvor, IbM'fhe miles rn on n "siUJmvn if jti-c r.nt nDtwrH fo nniario under i'ic The G. A. Jl. oi-fviously rtcmnnrled lint on3v the .sifii-s nnd sli'ines be shown ;U tlie joint con- vent ion. Two Die When Trapped In Gas-Filled Hole MIAMI BEACH, Fla., Oct. 8 (UP) Two men djed hereto- day, one of-them in a rescue at- tempt when three Southern tiell Telephone Co., employes were t.-.-ippod in .1 c.nrhon filled manhole. T, II. Griffin, who jumped into the death in n futile attempt to save three; of his fellow work- ers. dead on ill ;i lo- cal hospital. A. Johnson, who was working in underground pit, also died from the fumes. George llov.'cll ami W. J. Cnr- tei- wci'c lo he in a ser- ioir.-: coiulition ;U the liospital. Dave Mnrslmll, ;i Miami Ilciich lircmnn, who aided in bringing Ihe men from the manhole, was overcome hy the fumes. His condilion was reported to friir. CJriffin. rcalixinfi tlic of his companions, called lo two olher nearby and thrn jumped into (lie- manhole in an attempt to (he three men lo Ihr suiTnce. Miami Beach firemen were called to Ihe scene and removed Ihe victims from the pit. Nine Fined In Friday Term In Municipal Court if Mi tin were fined in Friday of municipal court, nrr-udt-rl over bv Judge Emmet Hnrty. Those fined .-mil the chovccs wliirh they convict- ed colored, charged Wallace Makes Request: Granted New York Cotton Exchange Announces Restrictions: N. 0. To Follow By FRED O. BAILEY United Press Staff Correspondent WASHINGTON, Oct. 8 (UP) A strong curb on "gambling in cotton in the face of second largest in American been imposed by the New York Cotton Exchange at the request of the federal government Sec- retary- of 'Agriculture' Henry A. Wallace The New York' exchange Wal- lace said, voluntarily minimum margin requirements ill his request.. Similar action to nil but hedging ind straddle operations is expected to be taken by Orleans the' 'Cabinet official said. The rule adopted by the New York exchange requires of all customers initial margins equal to not less than thoi'e fixed for clearing mdmbers by New York Cotton Exchange (Jlearmft Association, Inc. when customers', margins are depleted bv 50 per cent they must be rcs'tored to the initial amount. 'Further restrictions include "Any sales of purchases against a corresponding quantity or ap- proximate quantity of purchases or sales of (A) spot cotton (B) cotton products or, (C) futures contracts bought or sold simuU i .tancously in different months may exempt! frohr the provisibns'of. I h pro- vided that the carrying obtains from his written statement that all 5 trades are covered by1 this ceplion, which provides further? that the member is satisfied thai the statement is correct." Department of Agriculture of- ficials, who pointed out that there is no law under which the gov- ernment could have forced the cotton exchange to impose mini- mum margin requirements, said the rule would act as a "curb on. gambling." Wallace said: "The adoption of Ihe minimum requirements lends to insure fair competition between commission Continued Page Three W4S1N3TON DREW PERSON RpOERT 5. or I'dyc Three Dahl, Saved From Death, Plans To Resume Honeymoon n  Harold Dahl. Ch.im- paiL'n, HI., aviator who was sav- ed from execution by a pvrdon from Generalissimo Francisco Franco, planned tonight to re- sume an interrupter! honeymoon with his irlc of ciuht month-; and then seek flying job in the United Slates. "N'ow Hint Ihe bus bear rlcalh has disappeared, :ill I can think about is lo join my wcVe hardly h.-.rl a said Dahl. Dahl's bride. Mrs. Kdithe Hon- ors Dahl, an entertainer, is awbl- ing the release of her husband in Cannes, France. "Whatever she advises. I am going to do." said Dahl, "because she is level-beaderl and warned me against coming to Spain, iiut r am anxious to gel back into the flying gains." He said he had had the best right's sleep in months after learning of the pardon last nighi. He was captured by the Insur- gents after his plann was shot down July 12. Dahl rotiirnrtl io his cell aftcr hesrinc the verdict from iiis i.-nv- yer, Marijucsc Del Mcrito, and wrote two telegrams, one to franco and anr.tiicr to his wife. "Generalissimo Franco. no words c.iii possibly tell mv wholehearted gralffuiurss and npnrcciation of voiir clemencv." said the or.n. 1 know tl-t rne.ininj! and worth of real Span- ish yontlrrnr-n." limped for words then lo plii-iii-c a mcssarro lo his bride. "Deceived pardon from death by woitl from General Franco he wrote. "Will future- plans tomoi row. Worlds of love." He] Merilo conferred with Na- tionalist authorities to make ar- rangements for Dahl's release, ft was uncertain how soon the Dahl's could dcpr.rt for the United Stales in event an cnrly release is serum] because of passport difficulties. "All our papers are mixed Dahl said. His bride even have an American passport, he said, and his own is "phoney." (Keillor's -Vote: The Brass awarded this week to Dave Bc'.-k, bos.r of.the Am- erican Federation of Labor stronghold in the Northwest, "good for one free ride on The Washington Merry-Go- WASHINGTON' President Hoosevclt met a lot of poli- tically powerful people on his trip senators, congressmen, local bosses, news- napcr publishers and leading business executives, any one 'of whom commanded considerable? weight and prc-lige in his com- munity. But by far the most powerful was a beefy bald-head- cd gentleman who benrs only the innocuous title of "Organizer for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters in the 11 Rocky mountain and Pacific coast stales." but who actually is the of Seattle and the dominant factor in the Northwest. The gentleman in question is Dave Beck, sometimes called the John L. Lewis of .the West, 'houi.'h he uses Indies thai m'nko Lewis seem meek and mild in comparison. By these .Beck thumbed his at the courts denounced the New Deal's.Na- tional Relations Board, put ttw   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication