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Greenville Delta Democrat Times Newspaper Archive: August 21, 1939 - Page 1

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Publication: Greenville Delta Democrat Times

Location: Greenville, Mississippi

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   Greenville Delta Democrat Times (Newspaper) - August 21, 1939, Greenville, Mississippi                             Thert's Plenty of RESULTS In the Democrat WANT-ADS THE Delta Democrat-Times Weather Forecast Mississippi: Partly cloudy, lo-, cal thundershowcrs in south por- tion, cooler in west and north por- tions tonight; Tuesday generally fair. VOLUME 43 GREENVILLE, MISSISSIPPI MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 1939 NUMBER 297 New Indictments On Heels Of Long Catspaw'sSuicide Shushan Charged With Dr. Lorio, Smith, Four Others; Dr. Shaw Kills Self NEW OKLEANS, 21. (AP) L. Shushan. powerful Louisiana politician and former close associate of Hucy P. LOUR, was indicted by the federal grand jury here today along with' four other persons on charges of using Ihe mi.ils to defraud In a question- ed Orleans Levee Board bond re- lundiiif! transaction in which he allegedly received S132.7-10. Investment Firm Members Named with the 300-pound for- mer president of the levee board, whose name was stripped from aiuishnn airport two weeks ago were Robert J. Newman and Mor- T. Harris, jr., members of the prominent investment firm of Newman, Harris -and Company; Herbert W. Wasucspack, member of the levee board at the time of the transaction, an-l Henry J. Mil- ler, an accountant, all of whom allegedly shared in tlie paid in the refunding. Two other indictments were handed down today, one naming .Slate Senator Claience A. Lorio, prominent Baton Rouge politician and former aid to Hucy P. an-l the other Dr. James Monroe oinith, former head of Louisiana State University. Lorio was charg- ed with using the mails to defraud, oinith with income tax evasion. Case Complicated The violent death of Dr. ,1. A. Shaw, key government witness and keeper of Louisiana's oil in- dustry secrets (or :i decade, todav gravely complicated the federal investigation of tangled state af- fairs, but government prosecutors prwnised no letup. Kliaw, director of the mineral division of tiic Louisiana conser- vation department and titular of the state's oil industry, was found fatally wounded al his home hero last night. A revolver lay neai-by. He died on the opcr- alinn table al Baptist hospital 45 minutes later. Coroner C. Grenes Cole said it was suicide. Quickly altering plans, j CAN'T .AIAKK LIVING, SWALLOWS POISON I A mother who "couldn't make a living" for her three children, I is in King's Daughters Hospital today in critical condition after police said she swallowed poi- i son al her home Sunday morn- ing. i Mrs. M. L. Evcrclt. 11U1 South DeLesseps Slrcel, was re- ported slightly better at the I iiospilal this morniny. She was i taken to the hospital at I I a. i m. yesterday. Assistant Chief C. A. Iloll- ingsworlh said Mrs. I-A-erc'Ll left a note to her children say- ing she was unable to make a living. Her husband, died one year ago yesterday. G-MEN BRISTLING WITH TOMMY-GUNS SEEK LEPKE HIDEOUT Europe Enters Fateful Week-Is It Peace Or War? Jersey Mountains Scene of Manhunt For Public Enemy i BOUND BROOK. N. J., Aug. 21. (AP) Auto loads of federal agunts with machine guns combe.-.! the Walchung mountains near j he.ru today. Police Chief William i Nash of Hriund Brook said thev I were looking for the hideout he fugitive racketeer, Louis (Lup- BRITAIN FIRM AS SMALL NATIONS ACT IN PEACE CONCERT Hungarian Envoy Makes Cryptic Statement on 'Independence1 l.ONHOX. Aug. '21 Britain reaffirmed her policy of resistance to "aggress ion1J today as the government of Belgium in- itiated a peace pica on behalf of the small neutral Kurupcan -pow- ers. The foreign ministers of the Netherlands, Luxembourg. Swed- en. Norway. Finland and Denmark were called to Brussels to meet ;.s soon as possible this week with represent a lives of Belgium to confer on the plea. Thirty-seven-year old King Leo- pold himself was reliably reported to have called the meeting. Meanwhile, a British govern- jjinjy.------..-- rnent spokesman, referring to a statement of policy by Foreign Rather than disappuint hi-r fans ihirinj; a match al Now, Secrelary Lord Halifax July South Wales, Mildred Kahc Didriksmi continued her round; she hud disqualified herself at the. second hole. Here she is hitting a .short iron nl the sixth. attorneys began redrafting docti- Jersey Chief Nash said two carloads of Federal Hurcau of Inve.stiKatiun .slopped at his headiiuarte.-.s this morning, said they had a tip on Lepke's wliereabouts, and star- led off for nearby township in the i utfKed central Candidates In Home Stretch As Last Week Opens All Sections Of State To Be Visited By Conner And Johnson "There are many places a per- son could hide out up the chief .said. incnls foi- Hie federal grand jurv. I'riiscrutinn The prosecutors anltl Slinw'a iibscnco us a witness made the ei.se much more difficult but would no alter prosecution of for- mer Clovi'rnor Richard W. Lcclie and hotel owner Seymour I rAimril potent LOOK heirs, who are chart- [IIV flj Nfll Wn- U VWUI1VIL country. PARKS IN RACE edjyilh W. (Continued On 1'aKu B) GOTHAM'S MILK SUPPLY DWINDLES Says in Announcement That Starling Will Not Run Again h LaGuardia Calls Farmers And Distributors For Parley NKW YUKK. AUK. 21. fAPi As a swiftly-tightening Mrilii: nil New York City's milk supply in half. Mayor LaGuardia called farmers and distributor rep-; resentativcs together today for a; peace parley. The conference which the in- hoped would develop a promise agreement In end the. week-old dispute was preluded bv renewed violence upstate marker! Men C. Parks, resident nf Green- ville for the past years, and prominently identified with Scout work and other civic activi- ties, today became the first can- didate in the fall campaign for city council. Mr. Parks will run from the Second Ward. In making his announcement, Mr. M'tid th.il he had been told by l.yne Starling, prose n I councilman from the ward, that he did not intend to run again. 11 is statement follows: j "AI the request of my friends and neighbors in Ward Two, I am announcing mv candidacy tor city "'councilman. "This is Ihe first public ollico to which I have aspired in my lil HUMY JAWS OF WAR GOD BOOMS ARMS INDUSTRIES U. S. Aircraft Makers, Arsenals, Shipyards, Do Rush Business Force Iloclrinc IIU In that statement Halifax said that the doclrinc of force "bars the way to so.tUemeni" of Ger- many's claims and thai "in the. nf fin HUT aggress Ion we are resolved to use al once Ihe whole of our strength in fulfillment of our pledges." Tlio spokesman said Germany and had had ample oppor- tunity to be familiar with this policy. "Independent" BUDAPEST. Am-. 21. (AP) Count Csaky, Hungarian foreign (Continued On Page 8) JACKSON. Mi-ss.. Aug. '.M (AP) --Mississippi's gubernatorial can-1 didates will let all suctions of the! I stale share the political spotlight 'this wi-rk as they sweep into the illume stretch the Aug. rim- ampaign. -tli MJj-M.-jinpi, si-one uf cam- auain earlv this week. 1 capital city, will trad the spotlight t" mid-Mi.-sis-' sippi Wednesday and Thursday., 'Co MEDICAL FAKERS BESET GULLIBLE OF MISSISSIPPI Protection of Citizens Against Quacks and 'Remed- ies', Man Sized Job JACKSON, Miss.. AuKlist 21. (Spi'i xippi lire.llieilircc of _.............. 'Ill .-i Ann. 21. IICIT -Tin' indu.-li'v is liiniin snl, will --lam.1 sl.-iti-widc. niicl inudiuino :ind cniiiliivin.Til in :.l luMnrii- I'nimlrxHT I'urk ls the Missis- '.....MllllillK i.f tin-' f, IMwinf- n.rill. rc.-ull nl llic ;n-niy ;MHli Inr the (il'; :nul "Itlcr-- MUCL- u'l'fl-; nut j W'ui'lil W.ir. >l i-i cxpi-clMl bcilh I'iinilid.-ilcs Aircnilt :nid i-ncjll" h.n'i; will i-nlnplrtr llicil' nnlilli-d auUi'i'K-ililiB niuiv in Huuth Missix-ippi, yc! irnvis- j Ihnli TlHMi- Hod cluniii: 111.' hr.-ilcd ruilnll nine, j I i, nnlv :ilintlt Still 11110. Mlirl-TCl CltlllnK! by milk dumping and skull crack- ing in picket-police clashes. The growing milk shortage re- duced the usual .supply available In the metropolitan area from 4 to quarts. lloth sides gave assurances thai yc-ais uf rcsiclcnc-L- in Gruidiv If clcclc-d I plodjtc my.scif Cdiislriii-tive. Ijusincsslikt? ;md hu-i (Hill. T Ulilliv.-. oniplcynn-nl !-i--ini; in tin- Th" luu iiuluslry ;i ilii-w- supp'-i'tinH cUM's ill III" n! cc jinny ;ind ;nid I'nun n.-inu- end in .imnnu L'iun liuyi-rs. ITU-HIT.- pliint- Scnj.lnr Tlir-irlur UH-n.-.-iscd I'niin in hcljiiim plot llu campaiun. m the past week. yet big- rs oi the respective remained ever affairs. "11 is only fair to arid that Mr Lyne Starling, who has been needy c-onstnnrrs. nsid nlolnljl'r "ll' as .jublk- instilulions would ho SUn-i I IKIVC; lived in CliTc-nvillc, jintl plied adequately, but hundreds '.f without bottled represents Ward Two, floes not in- tend lo be a candidate for re-elec- tin j'.roL-cncs WCIT milk. In upstate-counties, more than 30 strikers were arrested. In On- county, fifty recruit after 2HO cans of milk were clumped bv strikers. Al OtfdenlnirH. persons watched police and btalc battle pickets at a milk plant. A dozen pickets received head in- juries. A deputy sheriff was knocked unconscious. Kerosene was jsed in .several: is in Washington county to spoil milk- in with burRlary other .usances, trucks were and ciothmK valuer -K.icted anrl their cargoes pour-i recovered. Dep- ed into ways.de ditches. Oi-casu.11 llty who worked for Mrs. Hackett NEGRO ADMITS BURGLARY HERE Deputy .Sherifl1   e-- lo ind corn in the Bl.ick Hell, a strip; dark, lerlili: running ca.s'.- vvest across the stale. i At llu> peak ol the flood the, Cross supei food ing nl11 I'olugees. convoy.1; nf' ;itid ti'Ui'ks. Tnrlay .stress on pret .iiitmus disease. Vacciuaiinns v.-oro made j Knginoer.s. .-ink-d Ijy numerous rtf i-onvict-i, ripened up ilianv ,-nI !he week hut declined tu any '.tatements. Senator Pat I llarrismi and Guvcmnr Hugh hitc. endorsers of Conner, work- md likc- during the minced I hey approvori with empha- sMes'iay but (t'ontinuc'd on fi) ixling to Doctor f-'elix J. Under- wiind. State Health Officer. He- peated art.- issued by the ol Uraltli against cancer specialists. "Indian" "di- vine and oilier Duet or Underwood says, and a full-time fit-Id man exerts every to track down these impos- ''II people only knew the harm these quacks do, ilicy would floe them like a pestilence." Doctor Underwood declares. "Instead, innocent but ignorant victims trust them, give tin; huge1 lees, and Hun when health and mnney are gone, go too lale to a reliable physician n err Spec in list" Doctor Underwood cites the case of a cancer "specialist" who has flourished in an east Mississippi town for years. "He claims lo have a secret plaster, the cunleilLs of which are Insl to hut himself. This enncnctinn applies to all skin blemishes, warts, sores, and occasionally cancer, extracting from each patient. His suc- cess lies in the fact that the pn- (ContiiHied on Page K) youth A Human Echo Who Can Duplicate Your Talk At Once ONK PISH STCWY THAT DIDN'T GROW KANSAS CITY, Aug. 1 is a slnry uf the fish that did not grow in tin-: j telling. C. E. Powell and Jerry Cm-, ever netted a four-pound pike i in Gull Lake. Minnesola. l! was placed on a steel near the boat's The pro- peller cut the sn'iiiger, but left I the pike's jaws locked in a steel i safety pin. 11 could open its j mouth about two inches, no j more. That was two years ago. Last week. Mrs. II. .J. Laii-, more, fishing in Gull Lake j j "had a peculiar strike; just :i 'feel'." i She reeled in a pike with a i steel pin in its jaws. "It was just skin and and weighed only about one and 'i half pounds. She removed the rusty stringer and placed thr fish back in the water. BURGLARS GET FROM SAFE OF MACHINE WORKS NAZIS WANTED TO GIVE BOOKS TO TAMPA UNIVERSITY Another Burglary Frus- trated by Police and Citizens Burglars sometime Saturday ighl battered open the safe door i the office of Greenville Manu- facturing and Miichino Works, South Theobald and the C. G. fiilway. and escaped with The intruder used a large .sledge hammer to force their way into the .safe. The burglary was dis- covered Sunday morning and Po- lice Officer Krnesl Godwin an- swered a call to the plant. Ser- geant Sam Valenciiia made an un- successful effort tn secure finger- prints from articles found near the snfe. Police and neighbors early Sun- day frustrated a burglary of tin.1 Market, Soulht Theobald and Pecan Street. A Mr. Sullivan who lives on Pecan Street saw a nugro entrr- ing the rear of the, market at a. m. He grabbed shotgun and nolified neighbors who called police. As Officer I3ob Uooliltlu drove a patrol car to the place the negro burglar leaped from a side window and escaped, lie got nothing from the .store. Trade Agreement Between Russia, Ger- many Stirs Statesmen of England, France Troops Massed On Polish Border (By Tliu Associated Press) Kuropc' today faced a week which many believed would bring developments pointing Lho way to poaee or war. As it started statesmen were puzzled by sudden announce- "ncnt of a new trade agreement between Communist Russia Nazi Germany. There was feverish diplomatic? activity and military meas- ures for possible conflict. Troops were rcproted massed on both sides of the Polish-Slovakian and Polish-German bor- ders. Political and economic sources in Berlin said the German- Soviet agreement probably would give Germany access to much-needed materials for strengthening the Reich's han 1 m Europe's power politics. Moscow Hails Pact In Moscow the newspaper Prav- organ of the Communist aid the trnclo. was expected ;o "dispel" iin atmosphere of "tensf political rein turns" between the two countries. Further Pravda aid, "it may become a serious tep in the direction of further mprovemunt of not only economic 'nit also political relations between the U. S. S. R. and Germany." Meanwhile Great Britain and France, attempting fo win Russia, into a mutual assistance pact for which they have been negotiating ince April, appeared no nearer agreement with Moscow. Military staff talks among the three pow-. were resumed in the Soviet' fipHal after a week-end recess. Prime Minister Chamberlain re-. Uirned from his vacation for .a. of cabinet ministers London tomorrow fo review the situatioin. "Day of KevkoniiiK" Germany's press stated thai Germany's "Day of Reckoning" wilh Poland over the Danzig sil- nation was approaching. "Ger- man patience" was said to be fast dying under "Polish inso- lence. Warsaw appeared calm in the crisis. Poland was said lo have sent troop reinforcements to her Gorman and Slovak borders after Germany was reported tol have placed troops under full war equipment along the Slovak side of the Polish frontier. The Polish moves were undertaken quietly, the only public announce- ment being that "certain defen- sive measures have been taken." So Testifies President to Dies Committee But Consul Denies WASHINGTON, Aug. 21 (AP) John Harvey Sherman, Presi- dent of Tampa, Kla.. University, told the Dies Commit lee today that a high German consular of- ficial had offered to donate bnok 10 his University's Library but that the offer was rejected. The official whom Khernvi" named, in testifying at the com- mittee ino.uiry into un-American practices, was Baron Edgar Frei- hurr Spiegel Von Und Ku Peck- elsheim, Cnnsul General at New Orleans. "The 13aron Sherman tes- tified, "this was a practice they foliowc-d to encourage the study of German in American colleges." Adding that Von Und Zu Peck- elsheim had said such donations had been made to other educa- tional institutions, the Umversit President declared: "Me didn't say where. I did not ask." ORDERS HERE FOR COTTON PICKERS FOR DELTA MKDINA, N. V.. Aug. 1M. (AIM Krancis Mag- admitted Hr 'holy a'hm. iiuw recitf- a few lines of Ihc psyehulogist said. He began: "Hence loathed mel- a in-holy." and Magnet' pick him up with the first sylhtble, re- cited with him: "Of ceberns and blackest midnight bnrn in stygian cave fni-luni. 'Mongst horrid shapes and sights and sounds un- Carleh.n F. Si-nln.'ld. professor uf oyy .it tlio Unjvcrsity "f twisters and even foreign Word Tor word, the psycholo- gist's speech emerged a duel on the nf hi.s subject, even t'> the "I can do this without looking "Thi-i boy the talk o' j JIK long a.s I can hear him." dtlu.T.1 with ;i peix'eptible lime m- !r: a! Ijelween words nf and his own." Dr. Kcn- fielH added. To Magner hun.-iolf. lliu str.uig-..' "1 S.-.Mield hi.-- expen Attention "The buy lias such a great ca- pacity of highly-skilled attention lo the variation of sounds as they appear in speech, that il is phe- Dr. Scofield declared. Manner's talent sometimes ii'ovc-.s ;i source of embarrassment. "1 ,ost my girl that he "We were dancing. nifnl by pulling the ymith Then :-hc began talking. I just -i i-t involving o'in-: echoed Lack, without meaning to. plicated neurological terms. IShe got so peeved that she walk- u.', uitlM.ul l.r.Ml.iliu.i.r.l ,.M II..... Workers Wanted Either Now Or Before September 1st Orders for cotton pickers tiad bi'i-n received by the special Vutti n picking" division of the Mississippi Slat e Kmployment Service at thu close of business i-'riday, MSKS Field Supervisor Robert I.. Hinds, who is in charge the unit, reports. Mr. Hinds lidded that the real flow uf labor will not begin until the latter part of this week. A special division was i pened n the Greenville District olfict- uf he Slate Kmployment Service last week to handle the transler of kers for orders received by the Greenville, ClarksdJile, Greenwood inri City offices which can lot be filled firm the local labor supply. The local of the Missis- sippi State Kmployment Service in Hipulation centers throughout the slate are registering all available cotton pickers for transportation to the Delta, thai Mississippi; workers may be used as far as pas- j sible in supplying the extra labor i that is required. Through the co- operation of these local offices! and the special transfer unit at Greenville, the flow of Mississippi cotton pickers intu the Delta can be handled effectively. riniilcrs Make Contracts The cotton planters who place their orders wilh the service make their own contracts with the pick- ers, mid in m os I cases furnish transportation. The Stale Kniploy- menl Service has the responsibil- ity of locating the wr.rkers and having them ready to move'at the time tliey are needed. While continued warm NEW ORLEANS. Aug. 21 (AP) Kdgar Spiegel Von Und 7.11 Peckelshoim, German Consul General here, today declared that he had answered the charges of John Harvey Sherman, Tampa University President ,in a stale- Mient issued April and referr- e t rj lies tinners to that statement. Ntiilr.smiMi Consul (The I3aron uses the shorten- name Kdgar Von The Consul General said on April 13, following publication in a nationally syndicated Washing- ton column of tin; Sherman charg- es, "all I remtMiiber is that I paid an official visit to one of the heads of Tampa University to- gether with my then Consular Far Kiisl Darker The Far Kastern picture appear- ed to have darkened over the wut'k-end. Japanese were threat- ening to blockade Britain's Crown colony of Hongkong in south Chi- iinti in Shanghai, at the cen- ter of the China coast, Hrilish- .Japanese relations were strained anew over the killing of two mem- bers of a Japanese-dominated po- Al Tientsin, in North China, Llie worst flood in tliu city's his- tory crippled the Japanese block- nde of the British concession. Meanwhile in Tokyo Uie neu-s- i.gent at lampa, Mr. hrnos Uer- rcpol.tod Jnonn an American bunion Honda. n Wronger policy toward Iho United States if an American arms embargo should be imposed against .Japan. Helen-ing to the secret report of the Dies Committee, mentioned in the Washington Merry-Go-Hound HI that is alloged I said is new io me. There was no no mention even of endowing a chair for the teaching of German al 111" Uni- versity or til using lex t boohs supplied by my government. "K very thing mentioned in this article is a wanton invention ex- cept that 1 did talk to a Univer- sity official a.s 1 have; stated, but one tiling I do remember clearly is that -this was the first and only visit I ever paid lo a man in an official position in America where the oflicial exceeded the bounds of euurtesy in attacking my government and its deeds. I remember after we left Mr. Ber- ger to me about the behaviour of the University of- ficial." FELTS WITHDRAWS FROM 2ND PRIMARY Will Not Oppose Scott Thompson For County Prosecutor Holland Kelts, CIreenville a I tor 'ley, who was runner-up in the first primary race fur county pros- today withdrew in favor of W. S. Thompson, the loading candidate. Mr. Felt's .statement follows: Hiiving just completed a survey nf my chances in the coming elec- tion, I am finally convinced that jjre.it majority nf voters uf windy woaihor is opening the cot-I Washington County U'finl W. S. ton very rapidly, the majority of j Thompson as their next County thu urduis call for the to report immediately and most of the larger planters are anxiou.' lo get the pickers in vacant ten- ant houses and (aiarters just as possible. The poak of the season undoubtedly will not br reat'hed until about Sept. IS, The employment office in Ciroenville is located al aiiJ Mnir slrci-l, telephone 137. Mr. E. Grndj Jolly is district manager for the Prosecuting Attorney. In the face of this fact I fevl hat from a financial as well as menial and physical standpoint both for Mr. Thompson and my- self, that t should withdraw from the race. I have been encouraged lo .so do by quite n number of my friends. I do not feel that I am luilling T have endeavored in .-very honorable way to the Ki-Y Leaders Drive For Funds In Hot Springs Taylor "Pal" Smith, general secretary of the Washington County Y. M. C. A., is in Hot Springs this week conducting u financial campaign in behalf of Kanip Ki-Y. Assisting him in thn work are Halph Schoonover, and Ilowse and Helen Lane, who are doing secretarial work for the txvo men. Interesl in Kamp Ki-Y by Hot Springs individuals and organiza- tions has increased very much during the past year, said Charles who is in charge of the "Y" during Mr. Smith's absence. Dur- ing the past camping season, fif- teen Hot Springs boys attended. LITTLE ANNIE (Continued On ID Wllll!   

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